Bio


Steven M. Gorelick is the Cyrus F. Tolman Professor in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University (on the faculty since 1988) and a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment. He directs the Global Freshwater Initiative with past and active projects in India, Mexico, Vietnam, and Jordan. Dr. Gorelick has published extensively in the areas of groundwater management, water resources vulnerability in developing regions, optimal remediation design, hydrogeophysics, ecohydrology, and global oil supply and demand.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Cyrus F. Tolman Professorship, Stanford University (2005 - Present)
  • Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment (2010 - 2015)
  • Professor, Stanford University (1996 - Present)
  • Associate Professor, Stanford University (1988 - 1995)
  • Visiting Professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (Spring) (2013 - 2013)
  • Visiting Professor, Centre for Ecohydrology, UWA, Perth, AU (Spring) (2012 - 2012)
  • Visiting Scholar, University of Cambridge, Dept. of Zoology (Spring-Summer) (2007 - 2007)
  • Visiting Professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Eco Engineering Lab, Switzerland (Spring-Summer) (2006 - 2006)
  • Visiting Scholar, Harvard University, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences (Winter) (1997 - 1997)
  • Hydrologist, US Geological Survey (1981 - 1988)
  • Post-Doctoral Fellow, Applied Earth Sciences, Stanford University (1981 - 1981)

Honors & Awards


  • Best Article of the Year, Padowski and Gorelick (2014), Environmental Research Letters, awarded (2015)
  • Editor's Choice Award, Srinivasan et al. (2012), American Geophysical Union, Water Resources Research, awarded (2013)
  • Elected Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012)
  • Fulbright Senior Scholar, Fulbright Australian-American Program (2008-2009)
  • Fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005)
  • M. King Hubbert Science Award, National Ground Water Association (2004)
  • Fulbright Senior Scholar, Fulbright Australian-American Program (1997-1998)
  • O.E. Meinzer Award, Geological Society of America (1994)
  • Fellow, American Geophysical Union (1990)
  • James B. Macelwane Medal, American Geophysical Union (1990)
  • Presidential Young Investigator Award, The White House and the National Science Foundation (1989)
  • Fellow, Geological Society of America (1988)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Stanford University Committee on Research, Stanford University (2013 - Present)
  • Member, EESS Graduate Admissions Committee, Stanford University (2012 - Present)
  • Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment (2010 - Present)
  • Director, Stanford Global Freshwater Initiative, Woods Institute/Stanford University (2009 - Present)
  • Affiliated faculty, E-IPER (formerly IPER), Stanford University (2005 - Present)
  • Member, Earth Sciences Council, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University (2004 - Present)
  • Advisor, Evaluation of Demand Uncertainty in Optimal Groundwater Management in Southwest Florida, Tampa Bay Water (2002 - Present)
  • Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1999 - Present)
  • Director, Stanford Center for Aquifer Simulation (CAS), Stanford University (1991 - Present)
  • Invited Lecture, Stanford Global Health Research Convening (2015 - 2015)
  • Chair, faculty candidate evaluation committee, Dept. of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University (2014 - 2014)
  • Invited Lecture, Environmental Engineering Seminar Series, UC Berkeley (2014 - 2014)
  • Invited Lecture, CEE179S/279S, Issues in Environmental Engineering, Science and Sustainability (2014 - 2014)
  • Invited Lecturer, Woods Institute, Retreat, Santa Cruz, CA (2014 - 2014)
  • Panelist, TM40, Thinking Matters, A Transition to Sustainability (2014 - 2014)
  • Reivew panel member, National Science Foundation, Hydrologic Sciences Program (2014 - 2014)
  • Water Panel Presentation, Global Freshwater Initiative, Woods Institute for the Environment (2014 - 2014)
  • Faculty candidate evaluator, Stanford in Government Fellowship program (2013 - 2014)
  • Member, faculty promotion committee, Dept. of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University (2013 - 2014)
  • Energy Resources Engineering, Faculty Promotion Committee, Stanford University (2013 - 2013)
  • Invited Lecturer, ETH Zurich, EPFL, Univ. of Paris VI, CA Independent Petroleum Assoc., and Chevron Fellows Meeting (2013 - 2013)
  • Invited Lecturer, ETH, Zurich and EAWAG, Dubendorf (2013 - 2013)
  • Keynote Lecturer, Vienna Catchment Science Symposium, on the theme of: Socio-hydrology – a new science of people and water (2013 - 2013)
  • Chair, EESS Senior Faculty Appointment Committee (joint appointment with Woods and Precourt Institutes), Stanford University (2012 - 2013)
  • Member, EESS Faculty Promotion and Tenure Committee, Stanford University (2012 - 2013)
  • Invited Lecturer, Earth Resources Engineering Section, National Academy of Engineering, Washington DC (2012 - 2012)
  • Invited Lecturer, Distinguished Lecture Series, International Water Symposium, Geoscience Australia, Canberra (2012 - 2012)
  • Invited Lecturer, Flinders University, National Groundwater Centre (NCGRT), Adelaide, Australia (2012 - 2012)
  • Invited Lecturer, CSIRO Land and Water, Perth Australia (2012 - 2012)
  • Invited Lecturer, Nanyang Technological University, Earth Observatory of Singapore (2012 - 2012)
  • Plenary Lecturer, 34th International Geologic Congress, Brisbane, Australia (2012 - 2012)
  • Member, AGU Hydrology Section, Water and Society Technical Committee (2011 - 2015)
  • Co-Organizer, AGU Session, Assessing Global Soil Change, Impacts on Hydrological and Ecosystem Services. (2011 - 2011)
  • Co-Organizer, AGU Session, Water and Society. (2011 - 2011)
  • External Reviewer, Doctorate of Xiang Zhao Kong, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH, Zurich (2011 - 2011)
  • Invited Speaker, ESR, New Zealand (2011 - 2011)
  • Keynote Speaker, River Corridor Restoration Conference 2011, Ascona, Switzerland (2011 - 2011)
  • Member, Visiting Committee, Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College (2010 - 2010)
  • Chair, EESS Graduate Admissions Committee, Stanford University (2009 - 2011)
  • Featured presenter, Woods Advisory Board meeting and Woods Water Salon (2009 - 2010)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee,, HydroPredict 2010, Prague (2009 - 2010)
  • Invited Speaker, CSIRO Perth, University of Western Australia Perth, International Association of Hydrogeologists (Perth), Engineers of Western Australia, UC Merced, USGS (Menlo Park) (2009 - 2009)
  • Moderator, Uncommon Dialogue, Stanford Water Resources Sustainability Inittiative (2009 - 2009)
  • Member, Faculty Search Committee in Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University (2008 - 2009)
  • Invited Plenary Lecturer, Pioneers in Groundwater, 6th Annual Groundwater Hydrology, Quality, and Management Symposium, ASCE, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress (2008 - 2008)
  • Invited Speaker, Symposium on Water Resources Systems Analysis: The Contributions of William Yeh (2008 - 2008)
  • Invited Speaker, UC Davis Hydrologic Science Seminar (2008 - 2008)
  • Lecturer, Troubed Waters, School of Earth Sciences public lecture series, Stanford University (2008 - 2008)
  • Panelist, NSF Hydrologic Sciences, CUAHSI Review (2008 - 2008)
  • Chair, Admissions Committee, Dept. of Geological & Environmental Sciences and Dept. of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University (2007 - 2008)
  • Member, Faculty Search Committee for a Computational Geoscientist, Stanford University (2007 - 2008)
  • Member, Faculty Search Committee for an Ecohydrologist, Stanford University (2007 - 2008)
  • Scientific Advisory Committee, HydroPredict '2008, Prague (2007 - 2008)
  • Invited Lecturer, Cambridge Conservation Forum, University of Cambridge, UK (2007 - 2007)
  • Invited Lecturer, University of Paris, Laboratory of Applied Geology (2007 - 2007)
  • Chair, Promotion Evaluation Committee, Stanford University (2006 - 2007)
  • Invited Lecturer, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory, Switzerland (2006 - 2006)
  • Faculty Advisory Panel, Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science, Stanford University (2005 - 2010)
  • Chair, Admissions Committee, Dept. of Geological & Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (2005 - 2007)
  • Stanford Representative, Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005 - 2007)
  • Invited Lecturer, University of Barcelona, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), and Swiss National Research Center for Water Pollution Control (EAWAG) (2005 - 2005)
  • Paloeclimate Faculty Pre-search Committee, Stanford University (2005 - 2005)
  • SES Center for Computation, Planning Committee, Stanford University (2005 - 2005)
  • Graduate Faculty, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (2004 - 2005)
  • Invited Speaker, UC Davis Distinguished Speaker Series (2004 - 2004)
  • Invited Speaker and Panel Member, Finite Element Modeling and Modflow Conference, Carlsbad, Czech Republic (2004 - 2004)
  • Member, SES Computer Resources Review Committee, Stanford University (2004 - 2004)
  • Member, SES Student Space and Funding Review Committee, Stanford University (2004 - 2004)
  • Member, CUAHSI California Hydrologic Observatory Working Group (2003 - 2005)
  • Member, Faculty Search Committee, Dept. of Geophysics, Stanford University (2003 - 2005)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, Finite Element Modeling and Modflow Conference, Carlsbad, Czech Republic (2003 - 2004)
  • Invited Lecturer,, US Geological Survey Water Resources Division Seminar Series (2003 - 2003)
  • Member, CUAHSI, Audit Committee an Legal Affairs Charter Mission Review Group (2003 - 2003)
  • Member, Hydrology Section AGU Fellows Committee (2002 - 2004)
  • Invited Lecturer, Water Resources Division Seminar Series, US Geological Survey (2002 - 2002)
  • Member, CUAHSI Executive Director Search Committee (2002 - 2002)
  • Advisor, Regional Aquifer Model Development, Texas Water Development Board (Duke/Intera) (2001 - 2004)
  • Advisory Committee, UPS Foundation Grant Program (2001 - 2004)
  • Representative to and Member of the Board of Directors, Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (2001 - 2004)
  • Member, Admissions Committee, Dept. of Geological & Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (2001 - 2003)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, ModelCare 2002, Prague (2001 - 2002)
  • Editorial Board, Transport in Porous Media (TiPM) (2000 - 2004)
  • Member, Hydrogeology Program Planning Group, Ocean Drilling Program/Joint Oceanographic Institutions (JOIDES) for Deep Earth Sampling (2000 - 2002)
  • Invited Lecturer, The Johns Hopkins University (2000 - 2000)
  • Member, Faculty Search Committee, Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University (2000 - 2000)
  • Associate Editor, Hydrogeology Journal (1999 - 2002)
  • Scientific Advisory Committee, International Conference on Future Groundwater Resources at Risk, Lisbon, Portugal (1999 - 2001)
  • Member, National Research Council Committee on Grand Challenges in Environmental Sciences Research (1999 - 2000)
  • Member, Expert Panel, Review of Minimum Flows and Water Levels, Southwest Florida Water Management District (1999 - 2000)
  • External Academic Juror,, Technical University of Denmark (1999 - 1999)
  • Chair, Review Panel for Hanford Sitewide Groundwater Model, PNNL/DOE (1998 - 2000)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, Groundwater 2000, Copenhagen (1998 - 2000)
  • Member, Macelwane Medal Selection Committee, AGU (1998 - 1999)
  • External Examiner, Ph.D. Committee, Technical University of Denmark 1998 External Juror, Ph.D. Jury, University of Paris, France (1998 - 1998)
  • Invited Speaker, Groundwater Research Centre, Technical University of Denmark (1998 - 1998)
  • Chair, Admissions Committee, Dept. of Geological & Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (1997 - 2000)
  • Scientific Advisory Committee, Model Calibration and Reliability Conference, Zurich, Switzerland. (1997 - 1999)
  • Chair, GSA Meinzer Award Committee (1997 - 1998)
  • Instructor, Aquifer Heterogeneity and Optimal Capture of Contaminants, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (w/ J.L. Wilson and L. Townley) (1997 - 1997)
  • Invited Speaker, MIT, Harvard University, University of Paris, USGS (Reston) CSIRO (Perth), CSIRO (Canberra), CSIRO (Adelaide), University of Western Australia, Institute of Engineers (Melbourne), Intl. Association of Hydrogeologists (Sydney) (1997 - 1997)
  • Invited Speaker and Panelist, International Conference on Groundwater Quality Protection: Technology and Management of NAPL Problems, Taiwan (1997 - 1997)
  • Keynote Speaker, MODSIM '97, Hobart, Tasmania (1997 - 1997)
  • Visiting Professor, University of Western Australia (1997 - 1997)
  • Visiting Scholar, Harvard University, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences (1997 - 1997)
  • Visiting Scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (1997 - 1997)
  • Member, California Environmental Protection Agency Risk Assessment Advisory Committee, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment Science Advisory Board (1995 - 1997)
  • Member, GSA Meinzer Award Committee, Stanford University (1995 - 1997)
  • Scientific Program Committee, AHS Scientific Assembly, Rabat, Morocco (1995 - 1997)
  • Member, Geology Corner Space Committee, Stanford University (1994 - 1996)
  • Member, Conceptual Model Uncertainty Group, Sandia National Labs, WIPP Performance Assessment Panel (1993 - 1998)
  • Member, Admissions Committee, Department of Geological & Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (1993 - 1997)
  • Member, Geostatistical Experts Group, Sandia Labs (1992 - 1997)
  • Member, US National Committee for IAHS (1991 - 1997)
  • Editorial Advisory Board, Associate Editor, Journal of Hydrology (1990 - 1996)
  • Member, Computer Committee, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University (1989 - 2009)
  • Faculty, US EPA, Western Region Hazardous Substance Research Center, Stanford University and Oregon State University (1989 - 2001)
  • Member, Urban Studies Program Committee, Stanford University (1988 - 2005)

Professional Education


  • PhD, Stanford University, Hydrology (hydrogeology) (1981)
  • MS, Stanford University, Hydrology (hydrogeology) (1977)
  • BA, New College (1975)

Patents


  • Steven M. Gorelick. "United States Patent US Patent 7,080,775 Methods and systems for automatically determining and collecting a monetary contribution from an instrument", American Cancer Society, Jul 25, 2006
  • Steven M. Gorelick and Haim Gvirtzman. "United States Patent 5389267 An in-situ system for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater", Leland Stanford Junior University, Feb 14, 1995
  • Steven M. Gorelick and Haim Gvirtzman. "United States Patent 5180503 In-situ vapor stripping for removing volatile organic compounds from groundwater Patent number", Leland Stanford Junior University, Jan 19, 1993

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Research
As a hydrogeologist, my research involves the study of water resources with emphasis on groundwater. Using lab and field data, our aim is to develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of the transport of fluids and contaminants, and to investigate regional water resources systems. We have developed simulation-based planning tools to aid in sustainable agricultural and urban water management in the US, Mexico, and India. With my colleagues, we have initiated the Global Freshwater Initiative, which studies water resources vulnerability problems throughout the world. During the past six years, our field investigations have focused on the interactions between groundwater and patterns of vegetation in studies of both meadow and salt-marsh hydroecology. Scales of physical processes of interest extend from the domain of small pores to vast regional subsurface flow environments. Although driven by observations and data, we develop conceptual and quantitative models to rigorously understand physical processes and make predictions. Such models enhance our understanding of groundwater flow behavior and provide the means to better manage water resources.

Teaching
I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students involving principles and methods used in physical and contaminant hydrogeology. In addition, I run a seminar series that exposes students to a variety of multidisciplinary topics involving hydrogeology and hydrology.

Professional Activities
2013 Editor's Choice Award, Water Resources Research for paper Srinivasan et al., (2012), Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012), International Fellow, Institute for Environmental Science and Research (ESR) (2011), New Zealand, Fulbright Senior Scholar (2008-09); Chester C. Keisel Memorial Lecturer, University of Arizona (2008); Best Paper Award in Computers and Geosciences, International Association for Mathematical Geology (2006); fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005); Stanford representative to the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005-2008); M. King Hubbert Science Award, NGWA (2004); Ineson Distinguished Lecturer (1998); Fulbright Senior Scholar (1997); O.E. Meinzer Award, GSA (1994) James B. Macelwane edal, AGU (1990); fellow, GSA (1988) and AGU (1990); Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1990-present); visiting professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory (2006); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, jointly at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (2005); visiting scholar, University of Cambridge, Zoology (2007); visiting scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (2009); Member AGU Water and Society Technical Committee (2011-present) visiting professor, University of Western Australia Centre for Ecohydrology (2012); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (2013).

2014-15 Courses


Postdoctoral Advisees


Journal Articles


  • Global change and the groundwater management challenge Water Resources Research (awaiting print) Gorelick, S. M., Zheng, C. 2015
  • Corrigendum: Global analysis of urban surface water supply vulnerability (2014 Environ. Res. Lett. 9 104004) ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Padowski, J. C., Gorelick, S. M. 2014; 9 (10)
  • Global analysis of urban surface water supply vulnerability ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Padowski, J. C., Gorelick, S. M. 2014; 9 (10)
  • Groundwater extraction, land subsidence, and sea-level rise in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Erban, L. E., Gorelick, S. M., Zebker, H. A. 2014; 9 (8)
  • Arsenic in the Multi-aquifer System of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: Analysis of Large-Scale Spatial Trends and Controlling Factors ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Erban, L. E., Gorelick, S. M., Fendorf, S. 2014; 48 (11): 6081-6088

    Abstract

    Groundwater exploitation is rising in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, potentially exacerbating arsenic contamination from natural sources. We investigate trends and controls on contamination patterns throughout the Delta's multi-aquifer system as observed in a spatially exhaustive data set of arsenic measured in >40,000 wells, 10.5% of which exceed the WHO drinking water standard for arsenic (10 μg/L). We relate strong trends in the distribution of contamination among well samples to explanatory variables derived from 3D ancillary physicochemical data sets using logistic regression models. Parsimonious models describe much of the observed variability in arsenic occurrence, which differs considerably between subsets of wells tapping shallow versus deeper aquifer groups. In the shallowest Holocene-Pleistocene aquifers, arsenic occurrence is best described by distance to the Mekong river channels and delta front, depth, and location within fault-bounded zones of the region. The same model, however, fails to explain observations in the deeper group of Pliocene-Miocene aquifers. Among these deeper units, arsenic occurrence is rare except among older wells in near-river, heavily pumped areas. Our analysis is the first to examine both natural and anthropogenically mediated contributions to the distribution of arsenic throughout the Mekong Delta's multi-aquifer system, with implications for management of similarly affected basins throughout Southeast Asia.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es403932t

    View details for Web of Science ID 000336952000005

  • Coupled impacts of sea-level rise and tidal marsh restoration on endangered California clapper rail Biological Conservation Zhang, H., Gorelick, S. M. 2014; 172: 89-100
  • Hydrological controls on methylmercury distribution and flux in a tidal marsh Environmental Science and Technology Zhang, H., Moffett, K. B., Windham-Myers, L., Gorelick, S. M. 2014; 48 (12): 6795–6804

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es500781g

  • Alameda Song Sparrow abundance related to salt marsh vegetation configuration San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science Moffett, K. B., Law, J., Gorelick, S. M., Nur, N., Wood, J. K. 2014; 12 (3)
  • Release of arsenic to deep groundwater in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, linked to pumping-induced land subsidence PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Erban, L. E., Gorelick, S. M., Zebker, H. A., Fendorf, S. 2013; 110 (34): 13751-13756

    Abstract

    Deep aquifers in South and Southeast Asia are increasingly exploited as presumed sources of pathogen- and arsenic-free water, although little is known of the processes that may compromise their long-term viability. We analyze a large area (>1,000 km(2)) of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, in which arsenic is found pervasively in deep, Pliocene-Miocene-age aquifers, where nearly 900 wells at depths of 200-500 m are contaminated. There, intensive groundwater extraction is causing land subsidence of up to 3 cm/y as measured using satellite-based radar images from 2007 to 2010 and consistent with transient 3D aquifer simulations showing similar subsidence rates and total subsidence of up to 27 cm since 1988. We propose a previously unrecognized mechanism in which deep groundwater extraction is causing interbedded clays to compact and expel water containing dissolved arsenic or arsenic-mobilizing solutes (e.g., dissolved organic carbon and competing ions) to deep aquifers over decades. The implication for the broader Mekong Delta region, and potentially others like it across Asia, is that deep, untreated groundwater will not necessarily remain a safe source of drinking water.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1300503110

    View details for Web of Science ID 000323271400029

  • The impact of urbanization on water vulnerability: A coupled human-environment system approach for Chennai, India GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE-HUMAN AND POLICY DIMENSIONS Srinivasan, V., Seto, K. C., Emerson, R., Gorelick, S. M. 2013; 23 (1): 229-239
  • Distinguishing wetland vegetation and channel features with object-based image segmentation INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING Moffett, K. B., Gorelick, S. M. 2013; 34 (4): 1332-1354
  • Peak oil demand: The role of fuel efficiency and alternative fuels in a global oil production decline Environmental Science and Technology Brandt, A., Millard-Ball, A., Ganser, M., Gorelick, S. M. 2013; 47: 8031-8041

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es401419t

  • The nature and causes of the global water crisis: Syndromes from a meta-analysis of coupled human-water studies WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Srinivasan, V., Lambin, E. F., Gorelick, S. M., Thompson, B. H., Rozelle, S. 2012; 48
  • Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Zoback, M. D., Gorelick, S. M. 2012; 109 (26): 10164-10168

    Abstract

    Despite its enormous cost, large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing CO(2) emissions associated with coal-based electrical power generation and other industrial sources of CO(2) [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2005) IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. Prepared by Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, eds Metz B, et al. (Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge, UK); Szulczewski ML, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:5185-5189]. We argue here that there is a high probability that earthquakes will be triggered by injection of large volumes of CO(2) into the brittle rocks commonly found in continental interiors. Because even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes threaten the seal integrity of CO(2) repositories, in this context, large-scale CCS is a risky, and likely unsuccessful, strategy for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1202473109

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306291400023

    View details for PubMedID 22711814

  • Salt marsh ecohydrological zonation due to heterogeneous vegetation-groundwater-surface water interactions WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Moffett, K. B., Gorelick, S. M., McLaren, R. G., Sudicky, E. A. 2012; 48
  • A method to calculate heterogeneous evapotranspiration using submeter thermal infrared imagery coupled to a stomatal resistance submodel WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Moffett, K. B., Gorelick, S. M. 2012; 48
  • Evidence that earthquake triggering could render long-term carbon storage unsuccessful in many regions (Reply to comment) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Zoback, M. D., Gorelick, S. M. 2012

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1217264109

  • Lessons Learned from 25 Years of Research at the MADE Site GROUND WATER Zheng, C., Bianchi, M., Gorelick, S. M. 2011; 49 (5): 649-662

    Abstract

    Field studies at well-instrumented research sites have provided extensive data sets and important insights essential for development and testing of transport theories and mathematical models. This paper provides an overview of over 25 years of research and lessons learned at one of such field research sites on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, commonly known as the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site. Since the mid-1980s, field data from the MADE site have been used extensively by researchers around the world to explore complex contaminant transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous porous media. Results from field investigations and modeling analyses suggested that connected networks of small-scale preferential flow paths and relative flow barriers exert dominant control on solute transport processes. The classical advection-dispersion model was shown to inadequately represent plume-scale transport, while the dual-domain mass transfer model was found to reproduce the primary observed plume characteristics. The MADE site has served as a valuable natural observatory for contaminant transport studies where new observations have led to better understanding and improved models have sprung out analysis of new data.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2010.00753.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294737800004

    View details for PubMedID 20860688

  • Investigation of Small-Scale Preferential Flow with a Forced-Gradient Tracer Test GROUND WATER Bianchi, M., Zheng, C., Tick, G. R., Gorelick, S. M. 2011; 49 (4): 503-514

    Abstract

    A new tracer experiment (referred to as MADE-5) was conducted at the well-known Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site to investigate the influence of small-scale mass-transfer and dispersion processes on well-to-well transport. The test was performed under dipole forced-gradient flow conditions and concentrations were monitored in an extraction well and in two multilevel sampler (MLS) wells located at 6, 1.5, and 3.75 m from the source, respectively. The shape of the breakthrough curve (BTC) measured at the extraction well is strongly asymmetric showing a rapidly arriving peak and an extensive late-time tail. The BTCs measured at seven different depths in the two MLSs are radically different from one another in terms of shape, arrival times, and magnitude of the concentration peaks. All of these characteristics indicate the presence of a complex network of preferential flow pathways controlling solute transport at the test site. Field-experimental data were also used to evaluate two transport models: a stochastic advection-dispersion model (ADM) based on conditional multivariate Gaussian realizations of the hydraulic conductivity field and a dual-domain single-rate (DDSR) mass-transfer model based on a deterministic reconstruction of the aquifer heterogeneity. Unlike the stochastic ADM realizations, the DDSR accurately predicted the magnitude of the concentration peak and its arrival time (within a 1.5% error). For the multilevel BTCs between the injection and extraction wells, neither model reproduced the observed values, indicating that a high-resolution characterization of the aquifer heterogeneity at the subdecimeter scale would be needed to fully capture 3D transport details.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2010.00746.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000292104400007

    View details for PubMedID 20807245

  • Spatial connectivity in a highly heterogeneous aquifer: From cores to preferential flow paths WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Bianchi, M., Zheng, C., Wilson, C., Tick, G. R., Liu, G., Gorelick, S. M. 2011; 47
  • Relationship of Salt Marsh Vegetation Zonation to Spatial Patterns in Soil Moisture, Salinity, and Topography ECOSYSTEMS Moffett, K. B., Robinson, D. A., Gorelick, S. M. 2010; 13 (8): 1287-1302
  • Salt marsh-atmosphere exchange of energy, water vapor, and carbon dioxide: Effects of tidal flooding and biophysical controls WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Moffett, K. B., Wolf, A., Berry, J. A., Gorelick, S. M. 2010; 46
  • Geological modeling of submeter scale heterogeneity and its influence on tracer transport in a fluvial aquifer WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Ronayne, M. J., Gorelick, S. M., Zheng, C. 2010; 46
  • Sustainable urban water supply in south India: Desalination, efficiency improvement, or rainwater harvesting? WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Srinivasan, V., Gorelick, S. M., Goulder, L. 2010; 46
  • A hydrologic-economic modeling approach for analysis of urban water supply dynamics in Chennai, India WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Srinivasan, V., Gorelick, S. M., Goulder, L. 2010; 46
  • Combining geologic-process models and geostatistics for conditional simulation of 3-D subsurface heterogeneity WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Michael, H. A., Li, H., Boucher, A., Sun, T., Caers, J., Gorelick, S. M. 2010; 46
  • Relative importance of dispersion and rate-limited mass transfer in highly heterogeneous porous media: Analysis of a new tracer test at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Liu, G., Zheng, C., Tick, G. R., Butler, J. J., Gorelick, S. M. 2010; 46
  • Factors determining informal tanker water markets in Chennai, India WATER INTERNATIONAL Srinivasan, V., Gorelick, S. M., Goulder, L. 2010; 35 (3): 254-269
  • Investigation of Small-Scale Preferential Flow with a Forced-Gradient Tracer Test Ground Water Bianchi, M., Zheng, C., Tick, G. R., Gorelick, S. M. 2010
  • Tsunami-induced groundwater salinization in southeastern India COMPTES RENDUS GEOSCIENCE Violette, S., Boulicot, G., Gorelick, S. M. 2009; 341 (4): 339-346
  • Identifying discrete geologic structures that produce anomalous hydraulic response: An inverse modeling approach WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Ronayne, M. J., Gorelick, S. M., Caers, J. 2008; 44 (8)
  • Processes controlling the thermal regime of saltmarsh channel beds ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Moffett, K. B., Tyler, S. W., Torgersen, T., Menon, M., Selker, J. S., Gorelick, S. M. 2008; 42 (3): 671-676

    Abstract

    Spatially and temporally continuous temperature measurements were collected over 32 h using a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system deployed along 330 m of two intertidal saltmarsh channel beds in northern California. Measured temperature gradients imparted ecosystem-scale structure to the saltmarsh tidal channel thermal regime, which was punctuated by potential warm and cold refugia. Anomalous bed temperatures of 2-4 degrees C occurred throughout the 1.3 tidal cycles at some locations. Discrete locations of consistently warm temperatures characterized sustained seepage of recently infiltrated tidal waters. Low-variance temperature anomalies were typically collocated with hidden microtopographic tributaries that facilitated mixing of warm surface waters and cold groundwater. Bed temperature gradients (approximately 2 degrees C/100 m, average) decreased from high temperatures similar to bay water at the channel mouths to low inland temperatures comparable to groundwater. The trends were maintained by cold groundwater discharge throughout the channels, which affected bed temperatures in proportion to channel reach exposure time; the opposing effect, conductive bed-warming by tidal waters, was proportional to flood duration. DTS is a promising tool for identifying spatial and temporal temperature patterns of hydroecological importance amidst complex natural systems.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es071309m

    View details for Web of Science ID 000252777600010

    View details for PubMedID 18323086

  • Evaluation of the applicability of the dual-domain mass transfer model in porous media containing connected high-conductivity channels WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Liu, G., Zheng, C., Gorelick, S. M. 2007; 43 (12)
  • Riparian hydroecology: A coupled model of the observed interactions between groundwater flow and meadow vegetation patterning WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Loheide, S. P., Gorelick, S. M. 2007; 43 (7)
  • The local geometry of gas injection into saturated homogeneous porous media TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA Selker, J. S., Niemet, M., Mcduffie, N. G., Gorelick, S. M., Parlange, J. 2007; 68 (1): 107-127
  • Reliable conjunctive use rules for sustainable irrigated agriculture and reservoir spill control WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Schoups, G., Addams, C. L., Minjares, J. L., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 42 (12)
  • Sustainable conjunctive water management in irrigated agriculture: Model formulation and application to the Yaqui Valley, Mexico WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Schoups, G., Addams, C. L., Minjares, J. L., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 42 (10)
  • Hydrogeophysical tracking of three-dimensional tracer migration: The concept and application of apparent petrophysical relations WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Singha, K., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 42 (6)
  • Comment on "Investigating the macrodispersion experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi, using a three-dimensional inverse flow and transport model'' by Heidi Christiansen Barlebo, Mary C. Hill, and Dan Rosbjerg WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Molz, F. J., Zheng, C., Gorelick, S. M., Harvey, C. F. 2006; 42 (6)
  • Quantifying stream-aquifer interactions through the analysis of remotely sensed thermographic profiles and in situ temperature histories ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Loheide, S. P., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 40 (10): 3336-3341

    Abstract

    The interaction between surface and subsurface waters through hyporheic exchange and baseflow is critical to maintaining ecological health in streams. During warm periods, groundwater-surface water interactions have two primary effects on stream temperature: (1) cool groundwater discharging as baseflow lowers stream temperature and (2) hyporheic exchange buffers diurnal stream temperature variations. We demonstrate, for the first time, how high-resolution, remotely sensed forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images and instream temperature data can be used to quantify detailed spatial patterns of groundwater discharge to a 1.7 km reach of Cottonwood Creek in Plumas National Forest, CA. We quantifythe individual effects of baseflow and hyporheic exchange on stream temperatures by simulating the stream energy budget under different conceptual models of the stream-aquifer interaction. Observed spatial and temporal patterns of stream temperature are consistent with an increase in baseflow and hyporheic exchange within the middle, restored stream reach when compared to groundwater fluxes in the surrounding, unrestored reaches. One implication is that pond and plug stream restoration may improve the aquatic habitat by depressing maximum stream temperatures by > 3 degrees C (K).

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es0522074

    View details for Web of Science ID 000237525500036

    View details for PubMedID 16749702

  • Effects of spatially variable resolution on field-scale estimates of tracer concentration from electrical inversions using Archie's law GEOPHYSICS Singha, K., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 71 (3): G83-G91

    View details for DOI 10.1190/1.2194900

    View details for Web of Science ID 000238819700020

  • Effective permeability of porous media containing branching channel networks PHYSICAL REVIEW E Ronayne, M. J., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 73 (2)

    Abstract

    We study the effective permeability of two-dimensional binary systems characterized by a network of branching channels embedded in a uniform matrix material. Channels are assigned a higher permeability than the surrounding matrix and, therefore, serve as preferential pathways for fluid migration. The channel networks are constructed using a nonlooping invasion percolation model. We perform extensive numerical flow simulations to determine the effective permeability tensor of channel-matrix systems with broadly varying network properties. These computed effective permeabilities are then used to systematically investigate the factors that control the permeability upscaling process. The upscaling framework adopted for this study is based on spatial power averaging. We determine the scaling behavior of the averaging exponent omega by analyzing its dependence on three characteristic properties of the channel-matrix system: (i) the channel-matrix permeability contrast; (ii) the fractal dimension of the channel network, df; and (iii) the average tortuosity of spanning paths on the network backbone, tau. The behavior of and the corresponding component of effective permeability in each principal direction (parallel and perpendicular to the network-spanning direction) are compared. The permeability anisotropy ratio is shown to be a clear function of key system properties.

    View details for DOI 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.026305

    View details for Web of Science ID 000235667700075

    View details for PubMedID 16605452

  • Combined interpretation of radar, hydraulic, and tracer data from a fractured-rock aquifer near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, USA HYDROGEOLOGY JOURNAL Day-Lewis, F. D., Lane, J. W., Gorelick, S. M. 2006; 14 (1-2): 1-14
  • Methods and systems for automatically determining and collecting a monetary contribution from an instrument US Patent 7,080,775 Gorelick, S. M. 2006
  • Field evaluation of in situ source reduction of trichloroethylene in groundwater using bioenhanced in-well vapor stripping ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Goltz, M. N., Gandhi, R. K., Gorelick, S. M., Hopkins, G. D., Smith, L. H., Timmins, B. H., McCarty, P. L. 2005; 39 (22): 8963-8970

    Abstract

    Two technologies in combination, cometabolic bioremediation and in-well vapor stripping, were applied to reduce trichloroethylene (TCE) concentrations in groundwater at a contaminant source area without the need to pump contaminated groundwater to the surface for treatment. The vapor-stripping well reduced source TCE concentrations (as high as 6-9 mg/L) by over 95%. Effluent from the well then flowed to two bioremediation wells, where additional reductions of approximately 60% were achieved. TCE removal was extensively monitored (for research and not regulatory purposes) using an automated system that collected samples about every 45 min at 55 locations over an area of approximately 50 x 60 m2. During 4.5 months of system operation, total TCE mass removal was 8.1 kg, 7.1 kg of which resulted from in-well vapor stripping and 1.0 kg from biotreatment. The system reduced the average TCE concentration of about 3000 microg/L in the source-zone groundwater to about 250 microg/L in water leaving the treatment zone, effecting greater than 92% TCE removal. A 6 month rebound study after system operation ceased found TCE concentrations then increased significantly in the treatment zone due to diffusion from the fractured rock below and perhaps other processes, with mass increases of about 1.5 kg in the lower aquifer and 0.3 kg in the upper aquifer.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es050628f

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233297100061

    View details for PubMedID 16323801

  • A local-scale, high-resolution evapotranspiration mapping algorithm (ETMA) with hydroecological applications at riparian meadow restoration sites REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT Loheide, S. P., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 98 (2-3): 182-200
  • Quantifying mass transfer in permeable media containing conductive dendritic networks GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Gorelick, S. M., Liu, G. S., Zheng, C. M. 2005; 32 (18)
  • MOD_FreeSurf2D: A MATLAB surface fluid flow model for rivers and streams COMPUTERS & GEOSCIENCES Martin, N., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 31 (7): 929-946
  • Estimation of groundwater consumption by phreatophytes using diurnal water table fluctuations: A saturated-unsaturated flow assessment WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Loheide, S. P., Butler, J. J., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 41 (7)
  • Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-scale spatial moment analysis WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Singha, K., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 41 (5)
  • Framework to evaluate the worth of hydraulic conductivity data for optimal groundwater resources management in ecologically sensitive areas WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Feyen, L., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 41 (3)
  • Semi-analytical method for departure point determination INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Martin, N., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 47 (2): 121-137

    View details for DOI 10.1002/fld.799

    View details for Web of Science ID 000226079300002

  • A general approach to advective-dispersive transport with multirate mass transfer ADVANCES IN WATER RESOURCES Wang, P. P., Zheng, C. M., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 28 (1): 33-42
  • Multi-objective calibration of a surface water-groundwater flow model in an irrigated agricultural region: Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico HYDROLOGY AND EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCES Schoups, G., Addams, C. L., Gorelick, S. M. 2005; 9 (5): 549-568
  • Effects of air injection on flow through porous media: Observations and analyses of laboratory-scale processes WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Dror, I., Berkowitz, B., Gorelick, S. M. 2004; 40 (9)
  • Limits of applicability of the advection-dispersion model in aquifers containing connected high-conductivity channels WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Liu, G. S., Zheng, C. M., Gorelick, S. M. 2004; 40 (8)
  • Reliable groundwater management in hydroecologically sensitive areas WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Feyen, L., Gorelick, S. M. 2004; 40 (7)
  • Time-lapse imaging of saline-tracer transport in fractured rock using difference-attenuation radar tomography WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Day-Lewis, F. D., Lane, J. W., Harris, J. M., Gorelick, S. M. 2003; 39 (10)
  • Time-lapse inversion of crosswell radar data GEOPHYSICS Day-Lewis, F. D., Harris, J. M., Gorelick, S. M. 2002; 67 (6): 1740-1752

    View details for DOI 10.1190/1.527075

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179840000006

  • Full-scale demonstration of in situ cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in groundwater - 2. Comprehensive analysis of field data using reactive transport modeling WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Gandhi, R. K., Hopkins, G. D., Goltz, M. N., Gorelick, S. M., McCarty, P. L. 2002; 38 (4)
  • Full-scale demonstration of in situ cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in groundwater - 1. Dynamics of a recirculating well system WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Gandhi, R. K., Hopkins, G. D., Goltz, M. N., Gorelick, S. M., McC rty, P. L. 2002; 38 (4)
  • Hydrogeology Program Planning Group Final Report JOIDES Journal Ge, S., Bekins, B., Bredehoeft, J. D., Brown, K., Davis, E. E., Gorelick, S. M., Henry, P., Kooi, H., Moench, A. F., Ruppel, C., Sauter, M., Screaton, E., P. K. Swart, T. Tokunaga, C. I. Voss, Whitaker, F. 2002; 28: 24-34
  • Solute transport in flow fields influenced by decimetre-scale preferential flow paths: implications for groundwater remediation GROUNDWATER QUALITY: NATURAL AND ENHANCED RESTORATION OF GROUNDWATER POLLUTION Zheng, C. M., Gorelick, S. M. 2002: 463-469
  • Inferring the relation between seismic slowness and hydraulic conductivity in heterogeneous aquifers WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Hyndman, D. W., Harris, J. M., Gorelick, S. M. 2000; 36 (8): 2121-2132
  • Identifying fracture-zone geometry using simulated annealing and hydraulic-connection data WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Day-Lewis, F. D., Hsieh, P. A., Gorelick, S. M. 2000; 36 (7): 1707-1721
  • Rate-limited mass transfer or macrodispersion: Which dominates plume evolution at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site? WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Harvey, C. F., Gorelick, S. M. 2000; 36 (3): 637-650
  • Attenuation-difference radar tomography: Results of a multiple-plane experiment at the US Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Research Site, Mirror Lake, New Hampshire GPR 2000: PROCEEDINGS OF THE EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON GROUND PENETRATING RADAR Lane, J. W., Day-Lewis, F. D., Harris, J. M., Haeni, F. P., Gorelick, S. M. 2000; 4084: 666-675
  • Convergence of stochastic optimization and decision analysis in the engineering design of aquifer remediation GROUND WATER Freeze, R. A., Gorelick, S. M. 1999; 37 (6): 934-954
  • Modeling mass transfer processes in soil columns with pore-scale heterogeneity SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL Haggerty, R., Gorelick, S. M. 1998; 62 (1): 62-74
  • Simulation-Optimization of Groundwater Pumping from the Gwelup Borefield, Western Australia CSIRO Land and Water Report No Ali, R., Gorelick, S. M., Turner, J. V. 1998
  • Laboratory-scale analysis of aquifer remediation by in-well vapor stripping - 2. Modeling results JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANT HYDROLOGY Pinto, M. J., Gvirtzman, H., Gorelick, S. M. 1997; 29 (1): 41-58
  • Experimental investigations for trapping oxygen gas in saturated porous media for in situ bioremediation WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH FRY, V. A., Selker, J. S., Gorelick, S. M. 1997; 33 (12): 2687-2696
  • Heterogeneity in sedimentary deposits: A review of structure-imitating, process-imitating, and descriptive approaches WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH KOLTERMANN, C. E., Gorelick, S. M. 1996; 32 (9): 2617-2658
  • Estimating lithologic and transport properties in three dimensions using seismic and tracer data: The Kesterson aquifer WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Hyndman, D. W., Gorelick, S. M. 1996; 32 (9): 2659-2670
  • A physically based model for air-lift pumping WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Francois, O., Gilmore, T., Pinto, M. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1996; 32 (8): 2383-2399
  • The effects of pulsed pumping on land subsidence in the Santa Clara Valley, California JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY Wilson, A. M., Gorelick, S. 1996; 174 (3-4): 375-396
  • Fractional packing model for hydraulic conductivity derived from sediment mixtures WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH KOLTERMANN, C. E., Gorelick, S. M. 1995; 31 (12): 3283-3297
  • MULTIPLE-RATE MASS-TRANSFER FOR MODELING DIFFUSION AND SURFACE-REACTIONS IN MEDIA WITH PORE-SCALE HETEROGENEITY WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Haggerty, R., Gorelick, S. M. 1995; 31 (10): 2383-2400
  • TEMPORAL MOMENT-GENERATING EQUATIONS - MODELING TRANSPORT AND MASS-TRANSFER IN HETEROGENEOUS AQUIFERS WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Harvey, C. F., Gorelick, S. M. 1995; 31 (8): 1895-1911
  • MAPPING HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY - SEQUENTIAL CONDITIONING WITH MEASUREMENTS OF SOLUTE ARRIVAL TIME, HYDRAULIC-HEAD, AND LOCAL CONDUCTIVITY WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Harvey, C. F., Gorelick, S. M. 1995; 31 (7): 1615-1626
  • WHEN ENOUGH IS ENOUGH - THE WORTH OF MONITORING DATA IN AQUIFER REMEDIATION DESIGN WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH JAMES, B. R., Gorelick, S. M. 1994; 30 (12): 3499-3513
  • AQUIFER REMEDIATION - A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING MASS-TRANSFER RATE COEFFICIENTS AND AN EVALUATION OF PULSED PUMPING WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Harvey, C. F., Haggerty, R., Gorelick, S. M. 1994; 30 (7): 1979-1991
  • COUPLED SEISMIC AND TRACER TEST INVERSION FOR AQUIFER PROPERTY CHARACTERIZATION WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Hyndman, D. W., Harris, J. M., Gorelick, S. M. 1994; 30 (7): 1965-1977
  • DESIGN OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION - SENSITIVITY TO RATE-LIMITED MASS-TRANSFER WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Haggerty, R., Gorelick, S. M. 1994; 30 (2): 435-446
  • ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTY IN OPTIMAL GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT CAPTURE DESIGN WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH TIEDEMAN, C., Gorelick, S. M. 1993; 29 (7): 2139-2153
  • DESIGN OF OPTIMAL, RELIABLE PLUME CAPTURE SCHEMES - APPLICATION TO THE GLOUCESTER LANDFILL GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION PROBLEM GROUND WATER GAILEY, R. M., Gorelick, S. M. 1993; 31 (1): 107-114
  • PALEOCLIMATIC SIGNATURE IN TERRESTRIAL FLOOD DEPOSITS SCIENCE KOLTERMANN, C. E., Gorelick, S. M. 1992; 256 (5065): 1775-1782

    Abstract

    Large-scale process simulation was used to reconstruct the geologic evolution during the past 600,000 years of an alluvial fan in northern California. In order to reproduce the sedimentary record, the simulation accounted for the dynamics of river flooding, sedimentation, subsidence, land movement that resulted from faulting, and sea level changes. Paleoclimatic trends induced fluctuations in stream flows and dominated the development of the sedimentary deposits. The process simulation approach serves as a quantitative means to explore the genesis of sedimentary architecture and its link to past climatic conditions and fault motion.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JA43400025

    View details for PubMedID 17743032

  • THE CONCEPT OF INSITU VAPOR STRIPPING FOR REMOVING VOCS FROM GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA Gvirtzman, H., Gorelick, S. M. 1992; 8 (1): 71-92
  • COUPLED PROCESS PARAMETER-ESTIMATION AND PREDICTION UNCERTAINTY USING HYDRAULIC-HEAD AND CONCENTRATION DATA ADVANCES IN WATER RESOURCES GAILEY, R. M., Gorelick, S. M., Crowe, A. S. 1991; 14 (5): 301-314
  • DISPERSION AND ADVECTION IN UNSATURATED POROUS-MEDIA ENHANCED BY ANION EXCLUSION NATURE Gvirtzman, H., Gorelick, S. M. 1991; 352 (6338): 793-795
  • BENEFITS OF AN IRRIGATION WATER RENTAL MARKET IN A SALINE STREAM-AQUIFER SYSTEM WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH LEFKOFF, L. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1990; 26 (7): 1371-1381
  • SIMULATING PHYSICAL PROCESSES AND ECONOMIC-BEHAVIOR IN SALINE, IRRIGATED AGRICULTURE - MODEL DEVELOPMENT WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH LEFKOFF, L. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1990; 26 (7): 1359-1369
  • LARGE-SCALE NONLINEAR DETERMINISTIC AND STOCHASTIC OPTIMIZATION - FORMULATIONS INVOLVING SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING Gorelick, S. M. 1990; 48 (1): 19-39
  • RELIABLE AQUIFER REMEDIATION IN THE PRESENCE OF SPATIALLY-VARIABLE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY - FROM DATA TO DESIGN WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH WAGNER, B. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1989; 25 (10): 2211-2225
  • PARTICLE TRAVEL-TIMES OF CONTAMINANTS INCORPORATED INTO A PLANNING-MODEL FOR GROUNDWATER PLUME CAPTURE JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY Greenwald, R. M., Gorelick, S. M. 1989; 107 (1-4): 73-98
  • EFFECTIVE GROUNDWATER MODEL PARAMETER VALUES - INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY, LEAKANCE, AND RECHARGE WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH GOMEZHERNANDEZ, J. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1989; 25 (3): 405-419
  • AQMAN: Linear and quadratic programming matrix generator using two-dimensional ground water flow simulation for aquifer management modelling Water Resources Investigation Lefkoff, L. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1989
  • DESIGN AND COST-ANALYSIS OF RAPID AQUIFER RESTORATION SYSTEMS USING FLOW SIMULATION AND QUADRATIC-PROGRAMMING GROUND WATER LEFKOFF, L. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1986; 24 (6): 777-790
  • A statistical methodology for estimating transport parameters: Theory and applications to one-dimensional advective-dispersive systems Water Resources Research Wagner, B. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1986; 22: 1301-1316
  • Evaluating strategies for groundwater contaminant plume stabilization and removal Selected Papers in the Hydrologic Sciences Gorelick, S. M., Wagner, B. J. 1986: 81-89
  • The problem of complex eigensystems in the semianalytic solution for advancement of time in solute transport simulations: A new method using real arithmetic Water Resources Research Umari, A. M. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1986; 22: 1149-1154
  • Estimating missing streamflow values by cokriging Mathematical Geology Solow, A. R., Gorelick, S. M. 1986; 18: 785-809
  • Optimal groundwater quality management under parameter uncertainty Water Resources Research Wagner, B. J., Gorelick, S. M. 1986; 23: 162-1174
  • Geologic inference from flow net transmissivity determination: Three case studies Water Resources Bulletin Rice, W., Gorelick, S. M. 1985; 21: 919-930
  • Hydraulic gradient control for groundwater contaminant removal Journal of Hydrology Atwood, D. F., Gorelick, S. M. 1985; 76: 85-106
  • A policy evaluation tool: Management of a multi-aquifer system using controlled stream recharge Water Resources Research Danskin, W. R., Gorelick, S. M. 1985; 21: 1731-1747
  • AQUIFER RECLAMATION DESIGN - THE USE OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT SIMULATION COMBINED WITH NONLINEAR-PROGRAMMING WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Gorelick, S. M., Voss, C. I., Gill, P. E., Murray, W., Saunders, M. A., Wright, M. H. 1984; 20 (4): 415-427
  • IDENTIFYING SOURCES OF GROUNDWATER POLLUTION - AN OPTIMIZATION APPROACH WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Gorelick, S. M., Evans, B., Remson, I. 1983; 19 (3): 779-790
  • A review of distributed parameter groundwater management modelling methods Water Resources Research Gorelick, S. M. 1983; 19: 18-32
  • A model for managing sources of groundwater pollution Water Resources Research Gorelick, S. M. 1982; 18: 773-781
  • OPTIMAL DYNAMIC MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER POLLUTANT SOURCES WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Gorelick, S. M., Remson, I. 1982; 18 (1): 71-76
  • OPTIMAL LOCATION AND MANAGEMENT OF WASTE-DISPOSAL FACILITIES AFFECTING GROUNDWATER QUALITY WATER RESOURCES BULLETIN Gorelick, S. M., Remson, I. 1982; 18 (1): 43-51
  • COMPUTER-MODELS IN GROUNDWATER EXPLORATION GROUND WATER Remson, I., Gorelick, S. M., FLIEGNER, J. F. 1980; 18 (5): 447-451
  • MANAGEMENT MODEL OF A GROUNDWATER SYSTEM WITH A TRANSIENT POLLUTANT SOURCE WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Gorelick, S. M., Remson, I., Cottle, R. W. 1979; 15 (5): 1243-1249

Books and Book Chapters


  • Groundwater and surface water Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences,, Gerald R. North (editor-in-chief), Ge, S., Gorelick, S. M. Academic Press. 2015; 2nd: 209-216
  • Operation and analysis of the BEHIVS system at Edwards Air Force Base, Final Report, Western Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center McCarty, P. L., Gorelick, S. M., Goltz, M. N., Hopkins, G. D., Eisenberg, F. 2003
  • Incorporating uncertainty into aquifer management models Subsurface Flow and Transport Gorelick, S. M. edited by Dagan, G., Newman, S. P. Cambridge University Press. 1997: 101-112
  • If it works, don't fix it: Benefits from regional groundwater management Groundwater Models for Resources Analysis and Management Bredehoeft, J. D., Reichard, E. G., Gorelick, S. M. 1995: 101-121
  • Incorporating assurance into groundwater quality management model Groundwater Flow and Quality Modelling Gorelick, S. M. edited by Custodio, E., Gurgui, A., Lobo Ferreira, L. P. 1986; 224: 135-150
  • Hydrologic issues in repository siting The technology of high-level nuclear waste disposal Remson, I., Gorelick, S. M. edited by Hofmann, P. L. 1982: 46-52
  • Management models incorporating groundwater variables Operations Research in Agriculture and Water Resources Remson, I., Gorelick, S. M. edited by Yaron, D., Tapiero, C. S. North Holland Publishing Co., Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 1980: 333-356

Conference Proceedings


  • Evaluation of Fickian and non-Fickian models for solute transport in porous media containing decimeter-scale preferential flow paths ModelCare07: Credibility of Modeling Bianchi, M., Zheng, C., Tkck, G. R., Gorelick, S. M. 2008
  • Coping with predictive uncertainties in optimization of sustainable water resources IUGG General Assembly Mok, C. M., Wanakule, N., der Kiureghian, A., Gorelick, S. M., Zhang, M. 2007
  • Analysis of solute transport in flow fields influenced by preferential flowpaths at the decimeter scale Zheng, C. M., Gorelick, S. M. BLACKWELL PUBLISHING. 2003: 142-155

    Abstract

    Several recent studies at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi, have indicated that the relative preferential flowpaths and flow barriers resulting from decimeter-scale aquifer heterogeneities appear to have a dominant effect on plume-scale solute transport. Numerical experiments are thus conducted in this study to explore the key characteristics of solute transport in two-dimensional flow fields influenced by decimeter-scale preferential flowpaths. A hypothetical but geologically plausible network of 10 cm wide channels of high hydraulic conductivity is used to represent the relative preferential flowpaths embedded in an otherwise homogeneous aquifer. When the hydraulic conductivity in the channels is 100 times greater than that in the remaining portion of the aquifer, the calculated concentration distributions under three source configurations all exhibit highly asymmetrical, non-Gaussian patterns. These patterns, with peak concentrations close to the source and extensive spreading downgradient, resemble that observed at the MADE site tracer tests. When the contrast between the channel and nonchannel hydraulic conductivities is reduced to 30:1 from 100:1, the calculated mass distribution curve starts to approach a Gaussian one with the peak concentration near the central portion of the plume. Additional analysis based on a field-scale model demonstrates that the existence of decimeter-scale preferential flowpaths can have potentially far-reaching implications for ground water remediation. Failure to account for them in numerical simulation could lead to overestimation of the effectiveness of the remedial measure under consideration.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000181382900005

    View details for PubMedID 12656281

  • Electrical imaging of tracer migration at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems (SAGEEP) Singha, K., Binley Jr., A. M., Lane, J. W., Gorelick, S. M. 2003
  • Characterization of fractured-rock aquifers using radar, tracer and hydraulic data Day-Lewis, F. D., Lane Jr., J. W., Hsieh, P. A., Gorelick, S. M. 2001
  • Field experiments using in situ bioremediation to treat trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater Meeting of the Korean Groundwater and Soil Environment Society (Spring) Goltz, M. N., Gandhi, R. K., Gorelick, S. M., Hopkins, G. D., McCarty, P. L. 2001
  • Application of circulating wells for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater International Symposium on Soil and Groundwater Contamination Control Strategy Gold, M. N., Gandhi, R. K., Gorelick, S. M., Hopkins, G. D., LeBron, C., McCarty, P. L., Reinhard, M. 2001
  • Geostatistical simulation of high-transmissivity zones at the Mirror Lake Site in New Hampshire: Conditioning hydraulic information Day-Lewis, F. D., Hsieh, P. A., Shapiro, A. M., Gorelick, S. M. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4018C. 1999: 685-694
  • USING AIRLIFT PUMPING AS AN IN-SITU AQUIFER REMEDIATION TECHNIQUE Gvirtzman, H., Gorelick, S. M. IWA PUBLISHING. 1993: 195-201
  • INSITU METHANOTROPHIC BIOREMEDIATION FOR CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT ST-JOSEPH, MICHIGAN McCarty, P. L., Semprini, L., Dolan, M. E., Harmon, T. C., TIEDEMAN, C., Gorelick, S. M. BUTTERWORTH-HEINEMANN. 1991: 16-40
  • Sensitivity analysis of optimal groundwater contaminant capture curves: Spatial variability and robust solutions Gorelick, S. M. 1987: 133-146