Graduate School of Education


Showing 11-20 of 123 Results

  • Brigid Barron

    Brigid Barron

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include the longitudinal documentation of learner pathways to engagement, studies of families as technology-supported learning teams, and the roles that personal learning networks play in catalyzing and sustaining interest-driven learning She is founder of the YouthLAB at Stanford, and a co-lead of TELOS, a Stanford Graduate School of Education Initiative to investigate how technologies can provide more equitable access to learning opportunities.

  • Eric Bettinger

    Eric Bettinger

    Conley DeAngelis Family Professor, Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBettinger, Eric and Bridget Long. “Simplification and Incentives: A Randomized Experiment to Increase College Savings."

    Antonio, Anthony, Eric Bettinger, Brent Evans, Jesse Foster, and Rie Kijima. “The Effect of High School College Advisement: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Texas.”

    Bettinger, Eric, Michael Kremer, Maurice Kugler, and Juan Saavedra. “The Effect of Educational Vouchers in Colombia on Students’ Labor Market Outcomes.”

    Bettinger, Eric, Oded Gurantz, Laura Kawano, and Bruce Sacerdote. "The Long-run Impacts of Merit Aid: Evidence from California's Cal-Grant."

    Bettinger, Eric, Lindsay Fox, Susanna Loeb, and Eric Taylor, “Changing Distributions: How Online College Classes Alter Student and Professor Performance.”

  • Jo Boaler

    Jo Boaler

    Nomellini and Olivier Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudying the Impact of a Mathematical Mindset Summer Intervention, HapCaps: Design and Validation of Haptic Devices for improving Finger Perception (with engineering & neuroscience) The effectiveness of a student online class (https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about) (NSF). Studies on mathematics and mindset with Carol Dweck and Greg Walton (various funders). Studying an online network and it's impact on teaching and learning (Gates foundation)

  • Hilda Borko

    Hilda Borko

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsToward a Scalable Model of Mathematics Professional Development: A Field Study of Preparing Facilitators to Implement the Problem-Solving Cycle

    The Problem-Solving Cycle (PSC) model of mathematics professional development encourages teachers to become part of a collaborative and supportive learning community. As they participate in the PSC, teachers think deeply about both mathematics content and instruction, and they explore their instructional practices with their colleagues through the use of video and other classroom artifacts. One iteration of the PSC consists of three interconnected professional development workshops, all organized around a rich mathematical task. During Workshop 1, teachers collaboratively solve the mathematical task and develop plans for teaching it to their own students. Shortly after the workshop, the teachers implement the problem with their own students and their lessons are videotaped. In Workshop 2 teachers explore the role they played in implementing the problem. In Workshop 3 teachers critically examine students’ mathematical reasoning.

    The Problem-Solving Cycle model provides a structure for mathematics teachers to work together and share a common mathematical and pedagogical experience. Our previous research suggests that it is a promising model for enhancing teachers’ knowledge and supporting changes in classroom practice.

    In our current project, initiated in Fall 2007, we are working with a group of middle school mathematics teachers in a large urban district to foster their leadership capacity, and specifically to prepare them to facilitate the Problem-Solving Cycle. We will provide 2½ years of preparation and support for teachers who have been designated as “mathematics instructional leaders.” These instructional leaders will in turn implement the PSC with the mathematics teachers in their schools. We will document the range and quality of the instructional leaders’ implementation of the PSC. We will also analyze the impact of the professional development process on the mathematical knowledge and classroom teaching of the instructional leaders and the mathematics teachers with whom they work. In addition, we will analyze the impact on their students’ mathematics achievement. By the conclusion of the project, we anticipate that the participating schools will have the infrastructure and capacity to carry out the PSC indefinitely, using their own resources. In addition, the project will produce a highly refined set of PSC facilitation materials—with a strong emphasis on supporting a linguistically and culturally diverse student population—that can be widely disseminated.

  • Bryan Brown

    Bryan Brown

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown's current research examines issues of stress, culture, and language. His work examines how science is taught is ways that may alienate urban students due to the approach to language instruction. This work includes experimental work involving technology based education and inner city teaching practices.

  • Eamonn Callan

    Eamonn Callan

    Pigott Family School of Education Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCivic and moral education; ethical and civic dimensions of educational policy; multicultural education and minority rights in education.