Graduate School of Education


Showing 101-130 of 130 Results

  • Jonathan Rosa

    Jonathan Rosa

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Linguistics, of Anthropology and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am currently working on two book projects through which I am continuing to develop insights into ethnoracial, linguistic, and educational formations. The first offers frameworks for understanding ethnoracial contradictions across distinctive societal contexts by interweaving ethnographic analysis of diasporic Puerto Rican experiences and broader constructions of Latinidad that illustrate race and ethnicity as colonial and communicative predicaments. The second spotlights decolonial approaches to the creation of collective well-being through educational and societal transformations based on longstanding community collaborations in Chicago.

  • Maria Ruiz-Primo

    Maria Ruiz-Primo

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioMaria Araceli Ruiz-Primo is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Education, Stanford University. Her work, funded mainly by the National Science Foundation and the Institute of Education Sciences, examines assessment practices and the assessment of student learning both in the classroom and in large-scale assessment programs. Her publications address the development and evaluation of multiple learning assessment strategies, including concept maps and students’ science notebooks, and the study of teachers’ informal and formal formative assessment practices, such as the use of assessment conversations and embedded assessments. She also has conducted research on the development and evaluation of assessments that are instructionally sensitive and instruments intended to measure teachers’ formative assessment practices. Recently she has worked on the analysis of state testing programs. She was co-editor of a special issue on assessment in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and a special issue on classroom assessment in the Journal of Educational Measurement. She has published in Science, Educational Measurement: Issues and Practices, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, and other major technical educational research journals.

  • Farzana Tabitha Saleem

    Farzana Tabitha Saleem

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioDr. Saleem is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. She earned her PhD in Clinical-Community Psychology from the George Washington University and completed an APA accredited internship, with a specialization in trauma, at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Saleem’s research examines the influence of racial stressors and culturally relevant practices on the psychological health, academic success, and well-being of Black adolescents and other youth of color. Dr. Saleem uses a strengths-focused and community-based lens in her research to study contextual nuance in the process and benefits of ethnic-racial socialization. She also explores factors in the family, school, and community contexts that can help youth manage the consequences of racial stress and trauma. Her current studies examine the utilization and benefits of ethnic-racial socialization across the school ecology. Dr. Saleem uses her research in each of these areas to inform the development and adaptation of programs and school-based interventions focused on managing racial stressors, eradicating mental health and academic racial disparities, and promoting resilience among historically marginalized and racially diverse children and adolescents. Dr. Saleem is a visiting scholar to the American Psychological Association RESilience Initiative and serves in other positions focused on inclusion, equity and social justice. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Saleem was a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow and a University of California Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California Los Angeles in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, with affiliation in the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies.

  • Shima Salehi

    Shima Salehi

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Education

    BioShima Salehi is a Research Assistant Professor at Stanford Graduate School of Education, and the director of IDEAL research lab, the research component of Stanford IDEAL initiative to promote inclusivity, diversity, equity and access in learning communities. Her research focuses on how to use different instructional practices to teach science and engineering more effectively and inclusively. For effective science and engineering education, Dr. Salehi has studied effective scientific problem-solving and developed empirical framework for main problem-solving practices to train students in. Based on these findings, she has designed instructional activities to provide students with explicit opportunities to learn these problem-solving practices. These activities have been implemented in different science and engineering courses. For Inclusive science and engineering, she examines different barriers for equity in STEM education and through what instructional and/or institutional changes they can be addressed. Her recent works focus on what are the underlying mechanisms for demographic performance gaps in STEM college education, and what instructional practices better serve students from different demographic backgrounds. Salehi holds a PhD in Learning Sciences and a PhD minor in Psychology from Stanford University, and received a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Iran. She is the founder of KhanAcademyFarsi, a non-profit educational organization which has provided service to Farsi-speaking students, particularly in under-privileged areas.

  • Daniel Schwartz

    Daniel Schwartz

    Dean of the Graduate School of Education and the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Educational Technology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInstructional methods, transfer of learning and assessment, mathematical development, teachable agents, cognition, and cognitive neuroscience.

  • Rich Shavelson

    Rich Shavelson

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAssessment of learning in higher education (including the Collegiate Learning Assessment); accountability in higher education; higher education policy.

  • Rebecca D. Silverman

    Rebecca D. Silverman

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on early language and literacy development and instruction.

  • Guillermo Solano-Flores

    Guillermo Solano-Flores

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research projects examine academic language and testing, formative assessment practices for culturally diverse science classrooms, and the design and use of illustrations in international test comparisons and in the testing of English language learners.

  • Mitchell L. Stevens

    Mitchell L. Stevens

    Professor of Education and. by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 04/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy most recent book is Seeing the World: How US Universities Make Knowledge in a Global Era, coauthored with Cynthia Miller-Idriss and Seteney Shami.

    With Ben Gebre-Medhin (UC Berkeley) I developed a synthetic account of change in US higher education.

    With Mike Kirst I edited a volume on the organizational ecology of US colleges and universities.

    With Arik Lifschitz and Michael Sauder I developed a theory of sports and status in US higher education.

    Earlier work on college admissions, home education, and (with Wendy Espeland) quantification continues to inform my scholarly world view.

  • Deborah Stipek

    Deborah Stipek

    Judy Koch Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarly childhood education (instruction and policy), math education for young children

  • Myra Strober

    Myra Strober

    Professor of Education, Emerita

    BioMyra Strober is a labor economist and Professor Emerita at the School of Education at Stanford University. She is also Professor of Economics at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University (by courtesy). Myra’s research and consulting focus on gender issues at the workplace, work and family, and multidisciplinarity in higher education. She is the author of numerous articles on occupational segregation, women in the professions and management, the economics of childcare, feminist economics and the teaching of economics. Myra’s most recent book is a memoir, Sharing the Work: What My Family and Career Taught Me About Breaking Through (and Holding the Door Open for Others) 2016). She is also co-author, with Agnes Chan, of The Road Winds Uphill All the Way: Gender, Work, and Family in the United States and Japan (1999).

    Myra is currently teaching a course on work and family at the Graduate School of Business.

    Myra was the founding director of the Stanford Center for Research on Women (now the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research). She was also the first chair of the National Council for Research on Women, a consortium of about 65 U.S. centers for research on women. Now the Council has more than 100 member centers. Myra was President of the International Association for Feminist Economics, and Vice President of the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund (now Legal Momentum). She was an associate editor of Feminist Economics and a member of the Board of Trustees of Mills College.

    Myra has consulted with several corporations on improved utilization of women in management and on work-family issues. She has also been an expert witness in cases involving the valuation of work in the home, sex discrimination, and sexual harassment.

    At the School of Education, Myra was Director of the Joint Degree Program, a master’s program in which students receive both an MA in education and an MBA from the Graduate School of Business. She also served as the Chair of the Program in Administration and Policy Analysis, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Acting Dean. Myra was on leave from Stanford for two years as the Program Officer in Higher Education at Atlantic Philanthropic Services (now Atlantic Philanthropies).

    Myra holds a BS degree in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University, an MA in economics from Tufts University, and a Ph.D. in economics from MIT.

  • Hariharan Subramonyam

    Hariharan Subramonyam

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioHari Subramonyam is an Assistant Professor (Research) at the Graduate School of Education and a Faculty Fellow at Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered AI. He is also a member of the HCI Group at Stanford. His research focuses on augmenting critical human tasks (such as learning, creativity, and sensemaking) with AI by incorporating principles from cognitive psychology. He also investigates support tools for multidisciplinary teams to co-design AI experiences. His work has received multiple best paper awards at top human-computer interaction conferences, including CHI and IUI.

  • Rebecca Tarlau

    Rebecca Tarlau

    Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    BioRebecca Tarlau is Associate Professor of Education at Stanford Graduate School of Education. Dr. Tarlau was formerly Associate Professor of Education and of Labor and Employment Relations at the Pennsylvania State University, where she was the co-founder of the Penn State Consortium for Social Movements and Education Research and Practice. Her ethnographic research agenda has four broad areas of focus: (1) theories of the state and state-society relations; (2) social movements and popular education, labor education, and critical pedagogy; (3) Latin American education and development; and (4) teachers’ unions, teacher activism, and teachers’ work.

    Dr. Tarlau is the author of the award-winning Occupying School, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education (2019, Oxford University Press, published in Portuguese in 2023 by Expressão Popular), which analyzes how a large grassroots social movement has linked education reform to its vision for agrarian reform by developing pedagogical practices for schools that foster activism, direct democracy, and collective forms of work. Contrary to the belief that social movements cannot engage the state without demobilizing, Tarlau shows how educational institutions can help movements recruit new activists, diversify their membership, increase technical knowledge, and garner political power. Dr. Tarlau’s forthcoming book Teacher Organizing Across the Americas: Diverse Strategies for Transforming Unions, Schools and Societies (Oxford University Press) explores why teachers’ unions in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States have embraced radically different strategies, and the important role of internal oppositional movements in transforming the goals and strategies of labor unions. Currently Dr. Tarlau is involved in a multi-country comparative study analyzing the impact of sustainable agriculture education on agroecological knowledge and landscape change in Latin America.

  • Candace Thille

    Candace Thille

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCIF21 DIBBs: Building a Scalable Infrastructure for Data-Driven Discovery and Innovation in Education: Funded by the National Science Foundation.
    In collaboration with Carnegie Mellon, MIT, and the University of Memphis, we are creating a community software infrastructure, called LearnSphere, which supports sharing, analysis, and collaboration across a wide variety of educational data. LearnSphere supports researchers as they improve their understanding of human learning. It also helps course developers and instructors improve teaching and learning through data-driven course redesign.

    The Learning Engineering Initiative: EdHub. Funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative/Silicon Valley Community Foundation.
    The EdHub project is a cross-sector initiative, to engineer the creation of a novel research and development hub in the Bay Area that is designed to integrate, by design, ongoing research in the Learning Sciences with ongoing approaches to enduring problems of practice within education.

    Adaptable Learning Feedback for Instructors: The Open Analytics Research System (OARS). Funded by the Stanford VPTL Innovation Grant.
    The activities and embedded assessments in online courseware provide support to students and generate fine-grained student learning data. The Open Analytic Research System (OARS) collects and models student learning data and and presents information to instructors in a dashboard to guide instruction and class activities.

    Next Generation Courseware Challenge: A Partnership for Iterative Excellence in Online Courseware for College Learners. Funded by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
    The OLI statistics courseware was created as an open educational resource (OER) on, the now proprietary, CMU OLI platform. In moving to Stanford, I moved the courseware to Lagunita, Stanford’s OpenEdx platform so that it would once again be an OER and extended the capabilities of the Lagunita platform to support the OLI statistics course. In collaboration with multiple partner institutions, we have continued to expand and update the courseware and conducted several learning studies. We have conducted studies in "Mindset" with Carol Dweck's (Stanford Psychology) PERTS group. In collaboration with Emma Brunskill (Stanford Computer Science), we are implementing an adaptive problem solver that uses Bayesian optimization algorithms to automatically identify which items to include in a practice set, and how to adaptively select these items in order to maximize student performance on the specified set of learning objectives and skills. Additional RCT studies that we are currently conducting in the OLI statistics courseware at our partner institutions include a study on the impact of prompting and scaffolding learners to make strategic choices about their use of course resources; and a separate study that builds affect detectors into the courseware to test the impact of timing interventions to the affective as well as cognitive state of the learner.

  • Guadalupe Valdés

    Guadalupe Valdés

    Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsValdés is the Founder and Executive Director of "English Together" a 501(c)(3) organization. The organization creates rich connections between ordinary speakers of English and low-wage, immigrant workers by preparing volunteers to provide one-on-one “coaching” in workplace English.

  • Maria Del Socorro Velazquez

    Maria Del Socorro Velazquez

    Social Sci Res Scholar

    BioMaria is an IDEAL Provostial Fellow/Academic Staff Researcher in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Her research examines housing, educational opportunity, educational policy, and place. She draws on qualitative methods and uses an interdisciplinary framework to draw attention to the socially constructed nature of inequities in schools and school communities. Relatedly, her work considers the efforts parents, educators, and community members take to contest and disrupt inequities in schools and school communities towards creating transformative opportunities for youth.

    Maria’s collaborative research and publications contribute to scholars’ and educational leaders’ understanding of the housing-school nexus, school-prison nexus, and school organizational policies and practices that contribute to categorical inequalities. Maria holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. in Educational Policy Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a B.A. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes. Image systems simulations of optics and sensors and image processing. Data and computation management for reproducible research.

  • Hans N. Weiler

    Hans N. Weiler

    Professor of Education and of Political Science, Emeritus and Academic Secretary to the University, Emeritus

    BioHans N. Weiler

    Professor Emeritus of Education and Political Science, and Academic Secretary, Emeritus, Stanford University
    Professor of Comparative Politics and Rektor, Emeritus, Viadrina European University, Frankfurt (Oder)

    Having been trained as a political scientist in Frankfurt/Main, Freiburg, and London,
    Hans N. Weiler has been a professor of education and political science at Stanford
    University since 1965, where he was instrumental in developing Stanford’s program
    in international development education (SIDEC). He was director of UNESCO’s
    International Institute for Educational Planning in Paris (IIEP) in the 1970s and has
    served as a consultant to a number of international organizations (including the
    World Bank and the African Development Bank), foundations and national
    governments in Europe, Africa, and South East Asia. At Stanford, he served as
    Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, as a University Fellow, and as Director of the
    Center for European Studies. He was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in
    the Behavioral Sciences, and has been awarded research fellowships and grants
    by, among others, the British Council, the Japan Society for the Promotion of
    Science, the Spencer Foundation, the Thyssen Foundation, the Friedrich Ebert
    Foundation, and the Deutsche Bank Foundation. In 1993, he was appointed a
    professor of comparative politics and elected the first Rektor (president) of Viadrina
    European University at Frankfurt (Oder), a position from which he retired in the fall
    of 1999. He chaired the Commission on Higher Education of the State of Saxony
    (1999-2002) and was instrumental in the founding and development of the Hertie
    School of Governance in Berlin from 2002 to 2009. He has served in a variety of
    advisory and consulting roles in German and European higher education between
    1999 and 2014. From 2014 to 2017, he served as Stanford’s Academic Secretary to
    the University.

    He has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the (private) Hertie School
    of Governance in Berlin, of the international boards of the Free University of Berlin
    and the Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien, of the Advisory Board of the Center for Higher
    Education Development (CHE) in Germany, and of the Global Scientific Committee
    for UNESCO’s Forum on Higher Education, Research and Knowledge. His service
    as an evaluator includes the “Excellence Initiative” in German higher education, the
    Berlin Social Science Research Center (Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin), the
    University of Freiburg, and various award competitions on research, teaching
    quality, and teacher education. His recent speaking engagements have included
    invited addresses in New York, Paris, Vienna, Budapest, San Francisco,
    Heidelberg, Berlin, Frankfurt/Main, Kuala Lumpur, Trieste, Johannesburg, Cape
    Town, Munich, Istanbul, and Stanford. He has been awarded the Order of Merit of
    the Republic of Poland (Commander’s Cross), of the Federal Republic of Germany
    (Bundesverdienstkreuz I. Kl.), and of the State of Brandenburg, as well as an
    honorary doctorate by Viadrina University, and honorary citizenship by the city of
    Frankfurt (Oder). His publications deal with the politics of educational change, the
    international politics of knowledge production, and the dynamics of reform and nonreform
    in higher education.

    Further information, including a list of publications and a
    more detailed CV, is available at www.stanford.edu/people/weiler.

    August, 2018

  • John Willinsky

    John Willinsky

    Khosla Family Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI work under the auspices of the Public Knowledge Project which is focused on extending access to, and the accessibility of, research and scholarship. The research is on student, professional, and public access to this educational resource, while PKP also engages in developing and designing open source software (free) publishing systems to improve the public and scholarly quality of peer-reviewed journals. This also involves international collaborations in Latin America, Africa, and South-East Asia are aimed at helping to better understand and strengthen scholarly publishing in those areas.

  • Sam Wineburg

    Sam Wineburg

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDistinguishing what is true in our current digital mess; the teaching and learning of history

    New book out in 2018, Why Learn History (When It's Already on Your Phone)

    How young people make decisions about what to believe on the Internet.

    New forms of assessment to measure historical understanding

    The creation of Web-based environments for the learning and teaching of history

  • Caroline Winterer

    Caroline Winterer

    William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Classics and of Education

    BioCaroline Winterer is William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, and Professor by courtesy of Classics. She specializes in American history before 1900, especially the history of ideas, political thought, and the history of science. She is currently writing a book on the history of deep time in America, to be published by Princeton University Press.

    She teaches classes on American history until 1900, including American cultural and intellectual history, the American Enlightenment, the history of science, and the trans-Atlantic contexts of American thought.

    She is the author of five books, including most recently Time in Maps: From the Age of Discovery to Our Digital Era (Chicago, 2020), edited with her Stanford colleague Karen Wigen. Assembling a group of distinguished historians, cartographers, and art historians, the book shows how maps around the world for the last 500 years have ingeniously handled time in the spatial medium of maps.

    Her book American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason (Yale, 2016), showed how early Americans grappled with the promises of the Enlightenment – how they used new questions about the plants, animals, rocks, politics, religions and peoples of the New World to imagine a new relationship between the present and the past, and to spur far-flung conversations about a better future for all of humanity. Earlier books and articles have explored America's long tradition of looking at the ancient classical world for political, artistic, and cultural inspiration. She received an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution for mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/dear-sir-ben-franklin-would-like-to-add-you-to-his-network-180947639/.

    She is currently accepting graduate students. For more information on the PhD program in the Department of History, visit: https://history.stanford.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs.

  • Christine Min Wotipka

    Christine Min Wotipka

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCross-national, comparative, and longitudinal analyses of leadership and higher education with a focus on gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics), of Education and of Psychology

    BioDr. Jason Yeatman is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Department of Psychology at Stanford University and the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child’s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.