Bio-X


Showing 21-40 of 76 Results

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the physics of cell migration, division, and morphogenesis in 3D, as well cell-matrix mechanotransduction, or the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices. For both these areas, we use engineered biomaterials for 3D culture as artificial extracellular matrices.

  • Bertha Chen, MD

    Bertha Chen, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology - Urogynecology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chen’s research examines the molecular causes of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. Recognizing that urinary incontinence linked to demise of smooth muscle sphincter function, she is investigating the potential use of stem cell regeneration to restore muscle capacity.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Jonathan H. Chen, MD, PhD

    Jonathan H. Chen, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformatics solutions ares the only credible approach to systematically address challenges of escalating complexity in healthcare. Tapping into real-world clinical data streams like electronic medical records will reveal the community's latent knowledge in a reproducible form. Delivering this back as clinical decision support will uniquely close the loop on a continuously learning health system.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWhat distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Xiaoke Chen

    Xiaoke Chen

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand how brain circuits mediate motivated behaviors and how maladaptive changes in these circuits cause mood disorders. To achieve this goal, we focus on studying the neural circuits for pain and addiction, as both trigger highly motivated behaviors, whereas, transitioning from acute to chronic pain or from recreational to compulsive drug use involves maladaptive changes of the underlying neuronal circuitry.

  • Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Mike Cherry

    Mike Cherry

    Professor (Research) of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research involves identifying, validating and integrating scientific facts into encyclopedic databases essential for research and scientific education. Published results of scientific experimentation are a foundation of our understanding of the natural world and provide motivation for new experiments. The combination of in-depth understanding reported in the literature with computational analyses is an essential ingredient of modern biological research.

  • Glenn M. Chertow

    Glenn M. Chertow

    Norman S. Coplon/Satellite Healthcare Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health
    On Leave from 08/01/2022 To 08/31/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsclinical epidemiology, health services research, decision sciences, clinical trials in acute and chronic kidney disease

  • Emilie Cheung, MD

    Emilie Cheung, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPyrocarbon humeral head replacement
    Clinical outcome after shoulder replacement
    Clinical outcome after elbow replacement
    Clinical outcomes following complex reconstruction of the shoulder and elbow,
    Bone mineral density in the shoulder,
    3D kinematics of the shoulder girdle after arthroplasty

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsContribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Gheorghe Chistol

    Gheorghe Chistol

    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in my laboratory is aimed at understanding how eukaryotes replicate their DNA despite numerous challenges (collectively known as replication stress), and more generally – how eukaryotic cells safeguard genome integrity. Specifically, we are investigating: (i) mechanisms that regulate the activity of the replicative helicase during replication stress, (ii) mechanisms that control the inheritance of epigenetic information during replication, and (iii) mechanisms of ubiquitin-mediated regulation of genome maintenance. We utilize single-molecule microscopy to directly image fluorescently-labeled replication factors and track them in real time in Xenopus egg extracts. I developed this system as a postdoctoral fellow, and used it to monitor how the eukaryotic replicative helicase copes with DNA damage. We plan to further extend the capabilities of this platform to directly visualize other essential replication factors, nucleosomes, and regulatory post-translational modifications like ubiquitin chains. By elucidating molecular mechanisms responsible for maintaining genome stability, we aim to better understand the link between genome instability and cancer, and how these mechanisms can be harnessed to improve disease treatment.

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    BioDr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • Wah Chiu

    Wah Chiu

    Wallenberg-Bienenstock Professor and Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research includes methodology improvements in single particle cryo-EM for atomic resolution structure determination of molecules and molecular machines, as well as in cryo-ET of cells and organelles towards subnanometer resolutions. We collaborate with many researchers around the country and outside the USA on understanding biological processes such as protein folding, virus assembly and disassembly, pathogen-host interactions, signal transduction, and transport across cytosol and membranes.

  • Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Constance Chu, MD

    Constance Chu, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery (Sports Medicine)

    BioDr. Constance R. Chu is Professor and Vice Chair Research, in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Stanford University. She is also Director of the Joint Preservation Center and Chief of Sports Medicine at the VA Palo Alto. Previously, she was the Albert Ferguson Endowed Chair and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a clinician-scientist who is both principal investigator of several projects funded by the National Institutes of Health and who has been recognized as a Castle-Connelly/US News and World Report “Top Doctor” in Orthopedic Surgery as well as on Becker’s list of Top Knee Surgeons in the United States. Her clinical practice focuses on the knee: primarily restoration and reconstruction of the ACL, menisci and cartilage. She graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

    As Director of the multi-disciplinary Joint Preservation Center structured to seamlessly integrate the latest advances in biologics, mechanics, and imaging with comprehensive patient centered musculoskeletal and orthopedic care, Dr. Chu aims to develop a new model for health care delivery, research and education with an emphasis on health promotion and prevention. Cornerstones of this program include teamwork and a focus on personalized medicine. A central goal is to transform the clinical approach to osteoarthritis from palliation to prevention. In addition to optimizing clinical operations, outstanding research is critical to developing more effective new treatments. Towards this end, Dr. Chu is leading innovative translational research from bench to bedside in three main areas: quantitative imaging and biomarker development for early diagnosis and staging of joint and cartilage injury and degeneration; cartilage tissue engineering and stem cell based cartilage repair; and molecular and biological therapies for joint restoration and joint rejuvenation. Her research efforts have led to more than 30 professional awards and honors to include a Kappa Delta Award, considered to be the highest research honor in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Dr. Chu also regularly holds leadership and committee positions in major professional organizations such as the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopedic Association (AOA). In her subspecialty of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, she is a past President of the Forum Sports Focus Group, a member of the Herodicus Society of leaders in Sports Medicine, and immediate past Chair of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Research Council. She is alumnus of the AOA American, British, Canadian (ABC) and the AOSSM Traveling Fellowships.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAfter shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Lawrence Chu, MD, MS

    Lawrence Chu, MD, MS

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have two lines of research, one involving educational informatics and use of technology in postgraduate medical education and another involving NIH-funded work in patient-oriented clinical research regarding opioid use and physiologic responses associated with acute and chronic exposure in humans.

    For a full description of my educational informatics work, please see my website aim.stanford.edu.

    My clinical research focuses on the study opiate-induced hyperalgesia in patients suffering from chronic pain.

    I am currently conducting an NIH-funded five year double-blinded randomized controlled clinical study (NIGMS award 1K23GM071400-01) that prospectively examines the following hypotheses: 1) pain patients on chronic opioid therapy develop dose-dependent tolerance and/or hyperalgesia to these medications over time, 2) opiate-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia develop differently with respect to various types of pain, 3) opioid-induced hyperalgesia occurs independently of withdrawal phenomena, and 4) opiate-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia develop differently based on gender and/or ethnicity.

    The study is the first quantitative and prospective examination of tolerance and hyperalgesia in pain patients and may have important implications for the rational use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain.