Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies


Showing 21-40 of 154 Results

  • Martha Crenshaw

    Martha Crenshaw

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a lead investigator with the National Center for the Study of Terrorism and the Response to Terrorism (START) at the University of Maryland, funded by the Department of Homeland Security, Martha Crenshaw analyzed failed and foiled terrorist plots against the United States and its allies by jihadist groups since 1993. A dataset including events in the United States, the EU, and NATO countries follows the GTD coding rules.

  • Larry Diamond

    Larry Diamond

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsdemocratic development and regime change; U.S. foreign policy affecting democracy abroad; comparative trends in the quality and stability of democracy in developing countries and postcommunist states; and public opinion in new democracies, especially in East Asia

  • Alberto Diaz-Cayeros

    Alberto Diaz-Cayeros

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComparative Politics, Political Economy, International Political Economy, Poverty, Rule of Law, Political Party Development

  • Karen Eggleston

    Karen Eggleston

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth reform in China; comparative healthcare systems in Asia; government and market roles in the health sector; payment incentives; healthcare productivity; and economic implications of demographic change.

  • Karl Eikenberry

    Karl Eikenberry

    Affiliate, FSI - S-APARC

    BioKarl Eikenberry is the William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and a faculty member of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University. He is also an affiliated faculty member with the Center for Democracy, Development, and Rule of Law, and researcher with The Europe Center.

    Prior to his arrival at Stanford, he served as the U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan from May 2009 until July 2011, where he led the civilian surge directed by President Obama to reverse insurgent momentum and set the conditions for transition to full Afghan sovereignty.
    Before his appointment as Chief of Mission in Kabul, Ambassador Eikenberry had a thirty-five year career in the United States Army, retiring in April 2009 with the rank of Lieutenant General. His military operational posts included commander and staff officer with mechanized, light, airborne, and ranger infantry units in the continental U.S., Hawaii, Korea, Italy, and Afghanistan as the Commander of the American-led Coalition forces from 2005-2007.
    He has served in various policy and political-military positions, including Deputy Chairman of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium; Director for Strategic Planning and Policy for U.S. Pacific Command at Camp Smith, Hawaii; U.S. Security Coordinator and Chief of the Office of Military Cooperation in Kabul, Afghanistan; Assistant Army and later Defense Attaché at the United States Embassy in Beijing, China; Senior Country Director for China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Mongolia in the Office of the Secretary of Defense; and Deputy Director for Strategy, Plans, and Policy on the Army Staff.

    He is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, has master’s degrees from Harvard University in East Asian Studies and Stanford University in Political Science, and was a National Security Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.

    Ambassador Eikenberry earned an Interpreter’s Certificate in Mandarin Chinese from the British Foreign Commonwealth Office while studying at the United Kingdom Ministry of Defense Chinese Language School in Hong Kong and has an Advanced Degree in Chinese History from Nanjing University in the People’s Republic of China.

    His military awards include the Defense Distinguished and Superior Service Medals, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Ranger Tab, Combat and Expert Infantryman badges, and master parachutist wings. He has received the Department of State Distinguished, Superior, and Meritorious Honor Awards, Director of Central Intelligence Award, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Distinguished Civilian Service Award. He is also the recipient of the George F. Kennan Award for Distinguished Public Service and Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Centennial Medal. His foreign and international decorations include the Canadian Meritorious Service Cross, French Legion of Honor, Afghanistan’s Ghazi Amir Amanullah Khan and Akbar Khan Medals, and the NATO Meritorious Service Medal.

    Ambassador Eikenberry serves as a Trustee for the International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Asia Foundation, and the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Diplomacy, and the Council of American Ambassadors, and was previously the President of the Foreign Area Officers Association. His articles and essays on U.S. and international security issues have appeared in Foreign Affairs, The Washington Quarterly, American Foreign Policy Interests, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Foreign Policy, and The Financial Times. He has a commercial pilot’s license and instrument rating, and also enjoys sailing and scuba diving.

  • Donald Emmerson

    Donald Emmerson

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSoutheast Asia; ASEAN; Indonesia; China; regionalism; Islamism; democracy; governance; U.S. foreign policy; and the sociology of scholarly knowledge

  • Rodney Ewing

    Rodney Ewing

    Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioRod Ewing is the Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security in the Center for International Security and Cooperation in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University. He is the Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan, where he was in three Departments: Earth & Environmental Sciences, Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. He is also a Regents' Emeritus Professor at the University of New Mexico.

    Ewing received a B.S. degree in geology from Texas Christian University (1968, summa cum laude) and M.S. (l972) and Ph.D. (l974, with distinction) degrees from Stanford University where he held an NSF Fellowship. His graduate studies focused on an esoteric group of minerals, metamict Nb-Ta-Ti oxides, which are unusual because they have become amorphous due to radiation damage caused by the presence of radioactive elements. Over the past forty years, the early study of these unusual minerals has blossomed into a broadly based research program on radiation effects in complex ceramic materials. This has led to the development of techniques to predict the long-term behavior of materials, such as those used in radioactive waste disposal. He is the author or co-author of over 750 research publications and the editor or co-editor of 18 monographs, proceedings volumes or special issues of journals. He has published widely in mineralogy, geochemistry, materials science, nuclear materials, physics and chemistry in over 100 different ISI journals. He has been granted a patent for the development of a highly durable material for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium.

    Ewing has received the Hawley Medal of the Mineralogical Association of Canada in 1997 and 2002, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, the Dana Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America in 2006, the Lomonosov Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2006, a Honorary Doctorate from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in 2007, Roebling Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America, and is a foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is also a fellow of the Geological Society of America, Mineralogical Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry, American Ceramic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Materials Research Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2017.

    He has been president of the Mineralogical Society of America (2002) and the International Union of Materials Research Societies (1997-1998). Ewing has served on the Board of Directors of the Geochemical Society (2012-2015) and the Board of Governors of the Gemological Institute of America (2006-2015). He is a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and on the Editorial Board of Applied Physics Reviews . He is a founding Editor of the magazine Elements, which is now supported by 17 earth science societies, and a Founding Executive Editor of Geochemical Perspective Letters. He is a member of the Board of Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (2017-2020).

    Professor Ewing is co-editor of and a contributing author of Radioactive Waste Forms for the Future (North-Holland Physics, Amsterdam, 1988) and Uncertainty Underground – Yucca Mountain and the Nation’s High-Level Nuclear Waste (MIT Press, 2006). He has served on eleven National Research Council committees for the National Academy of Sciences that have reviewed issues related to nuclear waste and nuclear weapons. He was appointed by President Obama to Chair the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (2012-2017).

  • Walter Falcon

    Walter Falcon

    Helen C. Farnsworth Professor of International Agricultural Policy, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsbiotechnology; food security; food and agricultural policy in developing countries

  • Thomas Fingar

    Thomas Fingar

    Lecturer, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChinese domestic and foreign policy, US-China relations, US foreign policy, intelligence analysis, mega-trends and global challenges, geopolitical consequences of climate change