Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 151-160 of 177 Results

  • Joseph D. Towles, PhD

    Joseph D. Towles, PhD

    Lecturer

    BioJoseph Towles is a Lecturer jointly appointed in the Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering Departments at Stanford University. Joe’s teaching interests are in the areas of solid mechanics, neuromuscular biomechanics, dynamical systems and control, and engineering design. His scholarship interests are in the areas of neuromuscular biomechanics and educational practices in engineering.

    A Mechanical Engineer by training, Joe earned his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and his MS and PhD degrees both in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (1996-2003). Following graduate school, Joe was a research post-doctoral fellow and subsequently a research scientist and then a research assistant professor in neuromuscular biomechanics in the Sensory Motor Performance Program at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Northwestern University (2003-2012). Additionally, Joe was a research health scientist for the Rehabilitation R&D Service in the Department of Veterans Affairs (Hines, IL) during that time and later a scientist in the neuromuscular biomechanics lab in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2012-2014). At the time, Joe led projects that addressed the broad question of how to restore hand function (ability to grasp objects) following cervical spinal cord injury and hemiparetic stroke using experimental and computational techniques in biomechanics. As a complement to intensively teaching within the undergraduate and graduate curricula in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2014-2018), and now teaching intensively and broadly within the undergraduate curricula of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering at Stanford, Joe's scholarship interests include both biomechanics and educational practices in engineering. Recent educational projects have investigated factors that influence K-12 students' engagement/interest in bioengineering, integration of CATME into an undergraduate mechanical engineering design course that enhances student experience and performance, analytical tool for improving intra- and inter-team communication in an engineering design course, and factors important for teaching undergraduate students how to identify healthcare needs worth pursuing in the context of health technology innovation efforts.

  • Scott Uhlrich

    Scott Uhlrich

    Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental biomechanical analysis of healthy and pathological human movement. Real-time biofeedback to modify motor control and kinematics.

    Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation for estimating unmeasurable quantities during movement, like joint forces in individuals with osteoarthritis. Predictive musculoskeletal simulations to design rehabilitation interventions.

    Computer vision, wearable sensing, and machine learning to develop tools that democratize biomechanical analysis and translate biomechanical interventions into clinical practice.

    Quantitative MRI for analyzing the effect of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis on cartilage health. PET-MRI for analyzing relationships between the mechanical loading of tissue metabolic activity.

  • Tom Van Wouwe

    Tom Van Wouwe

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioI received a B.S. degree in Engineering Science, Mechanical Engineering (2013, KU Leuven, Belgium) and a M.Sc. in Engineering Science, Biomedical Technology (2015, KU Leuven, Belgium). I worked for a year as an engineer in the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Beerse, Belgium). After, I returned to academia for a PhD on computational methods to simulate neuromechanical models of human movement. In January 2018 I received a four-year FWO-SB fellowship on the topic of my dissertation. During my PhD I collaborated with the Computer Science research group of the Georgia Institute of Technology and with the Department of Biomechanical Engineering of the University of Twente resulting in academic publications. I supervised ten master students in Rehabilitation & Movement Sciences for their master’s thesis projects and taught the practical sessions in the second year biomechanics course for undergraduate students in Rehabilitation & Movement Sciences.

  • Hannes Vogel MD

    Hannes Vogel MD

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics (Pediatric Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include nerve and muscle pathology, mitochondrial diseases, pediatric neurooncology, and transgenic mouse pathology.

  • Anthony Wagner

    Anthony Wagner

    Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences
    On Leave from 04/01/2022 To 06/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCognitive neuroscience of memory and cognitive/executive control in young and older adults. Research interests include encoding and retrieval mechanisms; interactions between declarative, nondeclarative, and working memory; forms of cognitive control; neurocognitive aging; functional organization of prefrontal cortex, parietal cortex, and the medial temporal lobe; assessed by functional MRI, scalp and intracranial EEG, and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

  • Rebecca D. Walker

    Rebecca D. Walker

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterests include international development in emergency care, healthcare disparities, wilderness medicine, human rights, administration

  • Greg Walton

    Greg Walton

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines the nature of self and identity, often in the context of academic motivation and achievement. I'm interested in social factors relevant to motivation, in stereotypes and group differences in school achievement, and in social-psychological interventions to raise achievement and narrow group differences.