Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 41-60 of 274 Results

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research, Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Moses Charikar

    Moses Charikar

    Donald E. Knuth Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Mathematics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEfficient algorithmic techniques for processing, searching and indexing massive high-dimensional data sets; efficient algorithms for computational problems in high-dimensional statistics and optimization problems in machine learning; approximation algorithms for discrete optimization problems with provable guarantees; convex optimization approaches for non-convex combinatorial optimization problems; low-distortion embeddings of finite metric spaces.

  • Akshay Chaudhari

    Akshay Chaudhari

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chaudhari is interested in the application of artificial intelligence techniques to all aspects of medical imaging, including automated schedule and reading prioritization, image reconstruction, quantitative analysis, and prediction of patient outcomes. His interests range from developing novel data-efficient machine learning algorithms to clinical deployment and validation of patient outcomes. He is also exploring combining imaging with clinical, natural language, and time series data.

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the physics of cell migration, division, and morphogenesis in 3D, as well cell-matrix mechanotransduction, or the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices. For both these areas, we use engineered biomaterials for 3D culture as artificial extracellular matrices.

  • E.J. Chichilnisky

    E.J. Chichilnisky

    John R. Adler Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctional circuitry of the retina and design of retinal prostheses

  • Eun Young Choi, PhD

    Eun Young Choi, PhD

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Choi is broadly interested in mapping the brain’s connectivity and characterizing its functional dynamics using advanced neuroimaging and clinical neurophysiological methods, as well as utilizing this information to identify individual-specific neurosurgical targets for neuromodulation (e.g., deep brain stimulation). Her prior work has mapped the functional and connectional organization of the striatum using neuroimaging and neuroanatomical connectivity methods. She is currently focused on the use of thalamic deep brain stimulation to improve memory and attention in traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Constance Chu, MD

    Constance Chu, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery (Sports Medicine)

    BioDr. Constance R. Chu is Professor and Vice Chair Research, in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Stanford University. She is also Director of the Joint Preservation Center and Chief of Sports Medicine at the VA Palo Alto. Previously, she was the Albert Ferguson Endowed Chair and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a clinician-scientist who is both principal investigator of several projects funded by the National Institutes of Health and who has been recognized as a Castle-Connelly/US News and World Report “Top Doctor” in Orthopedic Surgery as well as on Becker’s list of Top Knee Surgeons in the United States. Her clinical practice focuses on the knee: primarily restoration and reconstruction of the ACL, menisci and cartilage. She graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

    As Director of the multi-disciplinary Joint Preservation Center structured to seamlessly integrate the latest advances in biologics, mechanics, and imaging with comprehensive patient centered musculoskeletal and orthopedic care, Dr. Chu aims to develop a new model for health care delivery, research and education with an emphasis on health promotion and prevention. Cornerstones of this program include teamwork and a focus on personalized medicine. A central goal is to transform the clinical approach to osteoarthritis from palliation to prevention. In addition to optimizing clinical operations, outstanding research is critical to developing more effective new treatments. Towards this end, Dr. Chu is leading innovative translational research from bench to bedside in three main areas: quantitative imaging and biomarker development for early diagnosis and staging of joint and cartilage injury and degeneration; cartilage tissue engineering and stem cell based cartilage repair; and molecular and biological therapies for joint restoration and joint rejuvenation. Her research efforts have led to more than 30 professional awards and honors to include a Kappa Delta Award, considered to be the highest research honor in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Dr. Chu also regularly holds leadership and committee positions in major professional organizations such as the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopedic Association (AOA). In her subspecialty of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, she is a past President of the Forum Sports Focus Group, a member of the Herodicus Society of leaders in Sports Medicine, and immediate past Chair of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Research Council. She is alumnus of the AOA American, British, Canadian (ABC) and the AOSSM Traveling Fellowships.

  • Daniel Clark, MD, MPH

    Daniel Clark, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Clark is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiologist with the Adult Congenital Heart Program at Stanford Health Care. He is also a clinical assistant professor with dual appointments in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine and the Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Clark specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) and the management of congenital and acquired heart disease in children. His clinical focus involves the combined use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and other imaging techniques to evaluate patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. Dr. Clark’s extensive training and experience with these techniques include multiple fellowships in adult cardiology, cardiovascular imaging, and ACHD.

    Dr. Clark is currently a co-investigator on multiple research studies. During his fellowship, he received a training grant from the National Institutes of Health enabling evaluation of the ability of CMR to diagnose COVID-19-associated heart inflammation among college athletes. He currently uses CMR to assess heart transplant outcomes in donors positive for hepatitis C virus. Dr. Clark also received a research grant from the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Association supporting a randomized, controlled clinical trial of cardiac rehabilitation among patients with Fontan failure.

    Dr. Clark serves as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine, Circulation, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA). He serves on the editorial board for both JAHA and Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging. He is also a member of numerous professional medical societies, including the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the Adult Congenital Heart Association.

  • Todd Coleman

    Todd Coleman

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioTodd P. Coleman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, and by courtesy, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received B.S. degrees in electrical engineering (summa cum laude), as well as computer engineering (summa cum laude) from the University of Michigan (Go Blue). He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science. He did postdoctoral studies at MIT and Mass General Hospital in quantitative neuroscience. He previously was a faculty member in the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. Dr. Coleman’s research is very multi-disciplinary, using tools from applied probability, physiology, and bioelectronics. Examples include, for instance, optimal transport methods in high-dimensional uncertainty quantification and developing technologies and algorithms to monitor and modulate physiology of the nervous systems in the brain and visceral organs. He has served as a Principal Investigator on grants from the NSF, NIH, Department of Defense, and multiple private foundations. Dr. Coleman is an inventor on 10 granted US patents. He has been selected as a Gilbreth Lecturer for the National Academy of Engineering, a TEDMED speaker, and a Fellow of IEEE as well as the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is currently the Chair of the National Academies Standing Committee on Biotechnology Capabilities and National Security Needs.

  • Steven Hartley Collins

    Steven Hartley Collins

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    BioSteve Collins is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on design and robotics and directs the Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory. His primary focus is to speed and systematize the design and prescription of prostheses and exoskeletons using versatile device emulator hardware and human-in-the-loop optimization algorithms (Zhang et al. 2017, Science). Another interest is efficient autonomous devices, such as highly energy-efficient walking robots (Collins et al. 2005, Science) and exoskeletons that use no energy yet reduce the metabolic energy cost of human walking (Collins et al. 2015, Nature).

    Prof. Collins received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 from Cornell University, where he performed undergraduate research on passive dynamic walking robots. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from the University of Michigan, where he performed research on the dynamics and control of human walking. He performed postdoctoral research on humanoid robots at T. U. Delft in the Netherlands. He was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University for seven years. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    Prof. Collins is a member of the Scientific Board of Dynamic Walking and the Editorial Board of Science Robotics. He has received the Young Scientist Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Best Medical Devices Paper from the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, and the student-voted Professor of the Year in his department.

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Alia Crum

    Alia Crum

    Associate Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on how subjective mindsets (e.g., thoughts, beliefs and expectations) can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. We are interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes both within and beyond the realm of medicine, in the domains such as exercise, diet and stress. https://mbl.stanford.edu/

  • Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Dandekar is the Associate Director of Sports Psychiatry and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, he earned a Regents Scholarship to complete his M.D. at UC San Diego, where he received the American Academy of Neurology’s Prize for Excellence. During his residency and fellowship at Stanford, Dr. Dandekar provided care to a variety of patients utilizing a combination of medication management, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes (sleep, nutrition, exercise, recovery). Teamed with Clinical Professor Dr. Douglas Noordsy, he helped to incorporate psychiatric services into Stanford's sports psychology program, and continues to see elite athletes as part of the Stanford Sports Psychiatry Clinic. He also specializes in treating physicians, and sees many residents, fellows, and attendings in his private practice. In his free time, he enjoys playing tennis, chess, and guitar.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Beth Darnall

    Beth Darnall

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry & Psychology (Adult))

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Stanford Pain Relief Innovations Lab is dedicated to better characterizing and treating pain with patient-centered solutions. We specialize in the conduct of large-scale acute and chronic pain clinical trials that aim to (1) expand and scale access to behavioral medicine via digital and brief treatments; (2) reduce opioid risks via reduction for some and improved opioid access for others; (3) equip healthcare providers with brief behavioral medicine interventions to optimize health outcomes.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology), of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Partial Leave from 03/15/2024 To 06/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Luis de Lecea

    Luis de Lecea

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical and Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab uses molecular, optogenetic, anatomical and behavioral methods to identify and manipulate the neuronal circuits underlying brain arousal, with particular attention to sleep and wakefulness transitions. We are also interested in the changes that occur in neuronal circuits in conditions of hyperarousal such as stress and drug addiction.

  • Karl Deisseroth

    Karl Deisseroth

    D. H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKarl Deisseroth's laboratory created and developed optogenetics, hydrogel-tissue chemistry (beginning with CLARITY), and a broad range of enabling methods. He also has employed his technologies to discover the neural cell types and connections that cause adaptive and maladaptive behaviors.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford, James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging and health technology development. Discovering the principles of peak performance to advance human health. Human performance research. Wearable technologies, video motion capture, and machine learning to enable large-scale analysis.