School of Engineering


Showing 21-38 of 38 Results

  • Peter K. Kitanidis

    Peter K. Kitanidis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioKitanidis develops methods for the solution of interpolation and inverse problems utilizing observations and mathematical models of flow and transport. He studies dilution and mixing of soluble substances in heterogeneous geologic formations, issues of scale in mass transport in heterogeneous porous media, and techniques to speed up the decay of pollutants in situ. He also develops methods for hydrologic forecasting and the optimization of sampling and control strategies.

  • Fredrik Kjolstad

    Fredrik Kjolstad

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioFredrik Kjolstad is an assistant professor at Stanford University and works on topics in compilers and programming models. He is particularly interested in how we can build programming systems for sparse computing applications, for example in data analytics, computational engineering, and science. He received his PhD from MIT, his master’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his bachelor’s degree from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Gjøvik.

    Website: https://fredrikbk.com/

  • Perry Klebahn

    Perry Klebahn

    Adjunct Professor

    BioWhen it comes to startups, corporations and executive leadership, Perry’s seen just about everything. He's a seasoned entrepreneur, product designer, chief executive and co-founding member of the d.school faculty with over 20 years of experience. He also loves math, motorcycles and making things. Perry brought two out of three of those interests to bear when he created a new category of sportswear by way of a high-performance shoe — a snowshoe — for his product design master’s thesis. He went on to found the Atlas Snowshoe Company, which remains the leader in snowshoe design and technology. Perry sold Atlas and became the head of Sales and Marketing for the clothing brand, Patagonia in 2000. He then went on to be named the CEO of the iconic bag company, Timbuk2 in 2007. Both opportunities gave him extensive experience in brand turn-around, design and innovation. Despite his years running startups and corporations, Perry’s true calling is teaching. He leverages the breadth and depth of his experience as he pushes his students to bring rigor and precision to their fast-paced design work. His students often tell him that, while they were intimidated by him during the course, they're grateful for the pressure he placed on them to exceed their own expectations. Perry is a founding teaching team member for the d.school’s startup gauntlet class, Launchpad, the innovation leadership course, d.leadership and the week-long executive education intensive, Bootcamp. He is also on the teaching teams for the personal development course, Designer in Society and the organizational change course, d.org. In every class, Perry guides his students to look back in order to discover what to do next and works from the unshakeable belief that it’s always possible to see a problem differently.

    Perry is an Adjunct Professor and Director of Executive Education at the d.school. He holds a B.A. in Physics from Wesleyan University (1988) and a Master’s degree in Product Design from Stanford University (1991).

  • Donald Knuth

    Donald Knuth

    Fletcher Jones Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioDonald Ervin Knuth is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and Professor Emeritus at Stanford University.

    He is the author of the multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming and has been called the "father" of the analysis of algorithms. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it. In the process he also popularized the asymptotic notation. In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces.

    As a writer and scholar,[4] Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures. As a member of the academic and scientific community, Knuth is strongly opposed to the policy of granting software patents. He has expressed his disagreement directly to the patent offices of the United States and Europe. (via Wikipedia)

  • Mykel Kochenderfer

    Mykel Kochenderfer

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioMykel Kochenderfer is Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. Prior to joining the faculty, he was at MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he worked on airspace modeling and aircraft collision avoidance, with his early work leading to the establishment of the ACAS X program. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh and B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science from Stanford University. Prof. Kochenderfer is the director of the Stanford Intelligent Systems Laboratory (SISL), conducting research on advanced algorithms and analytical methods for the design of robust decision making systems. Of particular interest are systems for air traffic control, unmanned aircraft, and other aerospace applications where decisions must be made in uncertain, dynamic environments while maintaining safety and efficiency. Research at SISL focuses on efficient computational methods for deriving optimal decision strategies from high-dimensional, probabilistic problem representations. He is the author of "Decision Making under Uncertainty: Theory and Application" and "Algorithms for Optimization", both from MIT Press. He is a third generation pilot.

  • Julie Kolesar

    Julie Kolesar

    Research Engineer

    BioJulie Kolesar is a Research Engineer in the Human Performance Lab, supporting teaching and interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of engineering, sports medicine, and athletics. Her work aims to understand the underlying mechanisms relating biomechanical changes with function and quality of life for individuals with musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. As part of the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance, Dr. Kolesar engages in collaborations which seek to optimize human health and performance across the lifespan. Her expertise and research interests include experimental gait analysis, musculoskeletal modeling and simulation, and clinical interventions and rehabilitation.

  • Jeffrey Koseff

    Jeffrey Koseff

    William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research falls in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics and focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments. Current research activities are in the general area of environmental fluid mechanics and focus on: turbulence and internal wave dynamics in stratified flows, coral reef and sea-grass hydrodynamics, the role of natural systems in coastal protection, and flow through terrestrial and marine canopies. Most recently he has begun to focus on the interaction between gravity currents and breaking internal waves in the near-coastal environment, and the transport of marine microplastics. Koseff was formerly the Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and the Senior Associate Dean of Engineering at Stanford, and has served on the Board of Governors of The Israel Institute of Technology, and has been a member of the Visiting Committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Carnegie-Mellon University, The Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research, and Cornell University. He has also been a member of review committees for the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, The WHOI-MIT Joint Program, and the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority. He was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2015, and received the Richard Lyman Award from Stanford University in the same year. In 2020 he was elected as a Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. Koseff also serves as the Faculty Athletics Representative to the Pac-12 and NCAA for Stanford.

  • Gregory Kovacs

    Gregory Kovacs

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis present research areas include instruments for biomedical and biological applications including space flight, solid-state sensors and actuators, cell-based sensors for toxin detection and pharmaceutical screening, microfluidics, electronic interfaces to tissue, and biotechnology, all with emphasis on solving practical problems.

  • Christoforos Kozyrakis

    Christoforos Kozyrakis

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioChristos Kozyrakis research focuses on making computer system of any size faster, cheaper, and greener. His current work focuses on the hardware architecture, runtime environment, programming models, and security infrastructure for warehouse-scale data centers and many-core chips with thousands of general purpose cores and fixed functions accelerators.

  • Ilan Kroo

    Ilan Kroo

    Thomas V. Jones Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioProfessor Kroo's research involves work in three general areas: multidisciplinary optimization and aircraft synthesis, unconventional aircraft, and low-speed aerodynamics. Current research in the field of aircraft synthesis, sponsored by NASA and industry, includes the development of a new computational architecture for aircraft design, and its integration with numerical optimization. Studies of unconventional configurations employ rapid turnaround analysis methods in the design of efficient subsonic and supersonic commercial aircraft. Recent research has included investigation of configurations such as joined wings, oblique wings, and tailless aircraft. Nonlinear low-speed aerodynamics studies have focused on vortex wake roll-up, refined computation of induced drag, the design of wing tips, and the aerodynamics of maneuvering aircraft.

  • Ellen Kuhl

    Ellen Kuhl

    Walter B Reinhold Professor in the School of Engineering, Robert Bosch Chair of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputaitonal simulation of brain development, cortical folding, computational simulation of cardiac disease, heart failure, left ventricular remodeling, electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, computer-guided surgical planning, patient-specific simulation

  • Rajan Kumar

    Rajan Kumar

    Lecturer

    BioRajan (Raj) Kumar is a Lecturer and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Materials Science and Engineering Department and serves as a Lecturer Consultant with the Center for Teaching and Learning at Stanford University. He specializes in integrating research and communication learning goals into STEM courses and designing inclusive research experiences for undergraduates. Raj currently teaches a variety of undergraduate and master’s level MatSci courses and is the faculty coordinator for the MatSci REU Program. Through these efforts, Raj strives to help students develop strong research and communication skills and solve multidisciplinary problems.

    Raj received his both his BS (Northwestern) and his PhD (UC Berkeley) in Materials Science and Engineering. During his PhD, Raj studied electrochemical energy storage devices with an emphasis on developing printable batteries for integrated electronic systems. He also completed part of his PhD at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory through the Department of Energy SCGSR Fellowship. As a graduate student, Raj received the UC Berkeley Teaching Effectiveness Award and Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award. He also led workshops on effective teaching strategies for first-time graduate student instructors.

  • Anshul Kundaje

    Anshul Kundaje

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop statistical and machine learning frameworks to learn predictive, dynamic and causal models of gene regulation from heterogeneous functional genomics data.

  • Phillip Kyriakakis

    Phillip Kyriakakis

    Sr Res Scientist-Basic Life

    BioPhillip Kyriakakis, Ph.D. is Senior Research Scientist in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University in the Wu Tsai Institute for Neuroscience. Dr. Kyiakakis did his undergraduate work in Biochemistry at UMass Boston where he also worked in the lab of Dr. Alexey Veraksa's developmental biology lab doing biochemical experiments as well as starting to develop PhyB optogenetics (2008). Dr. Kyriakakis continued his education at UC San Diego in the Division of Biological Sciences. There he studied cellular programming and metabolism to obtain his degree with a specialization in Multiscale Biology. Dr. Kyriakakis did his postdoctoral work in the Bioengineering Department at UC San Diego with Todd Coleman continuing the development optogenetic tools and related technologies. In 2021 Dr. Kyriakakis moved to his Senior Research Scientist role at Stanford University in the Bioengineering Department in the Wu Tsai Institute for Neurosciences.