School of Engineering


Showing 61-68 of 68 Results

  • Robert Sutton

    Robert Sutton

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    BioRobert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and a Professor of Organizational Behavior (by courtesy) at Stanford. Sutton has been teaching classes on the psychology of business and management at Stanford since 1983. He is co-founder of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization, which he co-directed from 1996 to 2006. He is also co-founder of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (which everyone calls “the d school”). Sutton and Stanford Business School's Huggy Rao recently launched the Designing Organizational Change Project, which is hosted by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program

    Sutton studies innovation, leadership, the links between managerial knowledge and organization action, scaling excellence, and workplace dynamics. He has published over 100 articles and chapters on these topics in peer-reviewed journals and the popular press. Sutton’s books include Weird Ideas That Work: 11 ½ Practices for Promoting, Managing, and Sustaining Innovation, The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Firms Turn Knowledge into Action (with Jeffrey Pfeffer), and Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management (with Jeffrey Pfeffer). The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t and Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best…. and Survive the Worst are both New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers. His last book, Scaling-Up Excellence: Getting to More without Settling for Less (with Huggy Rao), was published in 2014 and is a Wall Street Journal and Publisher’s Weekly bestseller. Sutton's next book, The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal With People Who Treat You Like Dirt, will be published in September of 2017.

    Professor Sutton’s honors include the award for the best paper published in the Academy of Management Journal in 1989, the Eugene L. Grant Award for Excellence in Teaching, selection by Business 2.0 as a leading “management guru” in 2002, and the award for the best article published in the Academy of Management Review in 2005. Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense was selected as the best business book of 2006 by the Toronto Globe and Mail. Sutton was named as one of 10 “B-School All-Stars” by BusinessWeek , which they described as “professors who are influencing contemporary business thinking far beyond academia.” In 2014, the London Business School honored Sutton with the Sumantra Ghoshal Award for Rigour and Relevance in the Study of Management.

    Sutton is a Fellow at IDEO, a Senior Scientist at Gallup, and academic director of two Stanford executive education programs:Customer-Focused Innovation and the online Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate. His personal website is at www.bobsutton.net and he also blogs at Harvard Business Review and as an “influencer” on LinkedIn. Sutton tweets @work_matters.

  • Yuri Suzuki

    Yuri Suzuki

    Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHer interests are focused on novel ground states and functional properties in condensed matter systems synthesized via atomically precise thin film deposition techniques with a recent emphasis has been on highly correlated electronic systems:
    • Emergent interfacial electronic & magnetic phenomena through complex oxide heteroepitaxy
    • Low dimensional electron gas systems
    • Spin current generation, propagation and control in complex oxide-based ferromagnets
    • Multifunctional behavior in complex oxide thin films and heterostructures

  • Jelena Svorcan

    Jelena Svorcan

    Visiting Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering

    BioDr. Jelena Svorcan is currently a Visiting Associate Professor at Stanford University, Center for Turbulence Research through a Fulbright grant. Otherwise, she is employed as an Associate Professor at the Department of Aeronautics of the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (Serbia) where she also obtained her PhD in 2014 working on the optimization and computation of lifting surfaces. Throughout a decade long investigative career, her research has mainly been focused towards computational aerodynamics, numerical simulations of viscous and compressible flows, rotating lifting surfaces, wind energy, efficiency improvement, aircraft design and optimization. She has participated in several research projects (mainly focused on fluid flow analysis, composite rotors and drones), and authored or coauthored over 70 scientific publications and technical solutions. In Serbia, she continuously works with students and has mentored several MSc theses.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgram Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • James Sweeney

    James Sweeney

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, at the Precourt Institute for Energy and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeterminants of energy efficiency opportunities, barriers, and policy options. Emphasis on behavioral issues, including personal, corporate, or organizational. Behavior may be motivated by economic incentives, social, or cultural factors, or more generally, by a combination of these factors. Systems analysis questions of energy use.