School of Engineering


Showing 11-20 of 168 Results

  • Ronaldo Borja

    Ronaldo Borja

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioBorja works in computational mechanics, geomechanics, and geosciences. His research includes developing strain localization and failure models for soils and rocks, modeling coupled solid deformation/fluid flow phenomena in porous materials, and finite element modeling of faulting, cracking, and fracturing in quasi-brittle materials.

  • Jack Baker

    Jack Baker

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioJack Baker's research focuses on the use of probabilistic and statistical tools for modeling of extreme loads on structures. He has investigated probabilistic modeling of seismic hazards, improved characterization of earthquake ground motions, dynamic analysis of structures, prediction of the spatial extent of soil failures from earthquakes, and tools for modeling loads on spatially distributed infrastructure systems. Dr. Baker joined Stanford from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), where he was a visiting researcher in the Department of Structural Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from Stanford University, where he also earned M.S. degrees in Statistics and Structural Engineering. He has industry experience in seismic hazard assessment, ground motion selection, construction management, and modeling of catastrophe losses for insurance companies.

  • Dan Boneh

    Dan Boneh

    Rajeev Motwani Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Boneh heads the applied cryptography group and co-direct the computer security lab. Professor Boneh's research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, web security, security for mobile devices, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and is a Packard and Alfred P. Sloan fellow. He is a recipient of the 2014 ACM prize and the 2013 Godel prize. In 2011 Dr. Boneh received the Ishii award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D from Princeton University and joined Stanford in 1997.

  • Sarah Billington

    Sarah Billington

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioOur group conducts research on sustainable, durable construction materials and their application to structures and construction. Two current areas of focus are damage-tolerant, high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite materials, and bio-based fiber-reinforced polymeric composites that have a closed loop life-cycle. We are also developing methodologies for performance-based durability engineering with a focus on reducing the impacts of corrosion in structural concrete bridges and assessing the impact of climate change on the vulnerability of bridges to damage or collapse caused by scour. In the area of engineering education we are researching the impact of web-based activities on mechanics self-efficacy and achievement in an introductory course on solid mechanics.

  • Mohsen Bayati

    Mohsen Bayati

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research areas of interest include:

    1) Probabilistic and statistical models for decision making with large-scale and complex data (and applications in healthcare).

    2) Graphical models and message-passing algorithms.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined the faculty of Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and three books: Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron, and V. Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    Professor Boyd has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, given every three years for excellence in computational mathematical programming. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, and INFORMS, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education, with citation: “For excellence in classroom teaching, textbook and monograph preparation, and undergraduate and graduate mentoring of students in the area of systems, control, and optimization.” In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Leticia Britos Cavagnaro

    Leticia Britos Cavagnaro

    Adjunct Professor, Hasso Plattner Institute of Design

    BioLeticia Britos Cavagnaro, Ph.D., is co-Director of the University Innovation Fellows, a program of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school), which empowers students to be co-designers of their education, in collaboration with faculty and leaders at their schools. Leticia was Deputy Director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter), an NSF-funded initiative that operated from 2011 to 2016 to foster innovation and entrepreneurship in engineering education nationwide. She is an adjunct professor at the d.school, where she teaches Stanford students of all disciplines how to build their creative confidence to become engines of innovation in teams and organizations. Leticia has a Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from Stanford's School of Medicine, and is a former member of the Research in Education & Design Lab (REDlab) at Stanford’s School of Education. Having witnessed the journey of students who are transformed by their experience at the d.school, bringing design thinking to more people beyond Stanford has become a priority for Leticia, and she has worked with hundreds of educators and students of all ages, as well as corporate and non-profit leaders in the US and abroad. In the Summer of 2013, Leticia engaged thousands of people from over 130 countries in learning design thinking and applying the methodology to innovate in their contexts, via an experiential MOOC (http://novoed.com/designthinking).

    Find out more about Leticia's work at:
    http://universityinnovationfellows.org
    http://epicenter.stanford.edu
    http://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/teaching-talk/design-thinking-action-lab-1

    Connect with Leticia:
    LinkedIn: linkedin.com/pub/leticia-britos-cavagnaro/9/b4a/752/
    Twitter: @LeticiaBritosC (twitter.com/leticiabritosc)

  • Audrey (Ellerbee) Bowden

    Audrey (Ellerbee) Bowden

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioOur lab seeks to develop and deploy novel tools for optical imaging and sensing at the microscale and nanoscale. Our work finds applications both in the clinic and for basic science research; we also have particular interest in the development of low-cost, portable technologies suited for use in poorly resourced environments.

  • Reilly Patrick Brennan

    Reilly Patrick Brennan

    Affiliate, REVS Program at Stanford

    BioReilly P. Brennan is a founding partner at Trucks, a seed-stage venture capital fund for entrepreneurs changing the future of transportation. Trucks investments focus on autonomous, connected and shared vehicle technologies.

    Reilly holds a teaching appointment at Stanford University, where he teaches twice per year in the School of Engineering and the d.school. His classes bridge the fields of transportation, design and entrepreneurship. He is a dedicated educator and advisor to young researchers and entrepreneurs, actively participating in mentorship roles at Techstars Mobility and the University of Michigan.

    His influential newsletter FoT is a radar for what’s happening in transportation.

    Prior to Trucks, Reilly was Executive Director for Stanford’s automotive research program, Revs. Prior to Stanford he developed his love for transportation in media and technology at editorial publications ranging from Automobile to AOL to Monocle and seat time in over 1000 test cars. He was a member of the Le Mans-winning factory Corvette C5-R program. His personal land speed record is 168 mph, behind the wheel of a Chaparral 2E.