School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 88 Results

  • Stephen Haber

    Stephen Haber

    A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioStephen Haber is A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is also Professor of Political Science, Professor of History, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy), a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Center for International Development. Haber’s research spans a number of academic disciplines, including comparative politics, financial economics, and economic history. He has authored, coauthored, or edited ten books, and his papers have been published in journals such as American Political Science Review, World Politics, International Security, the Journal of Economic History, the Hispanic American Historical Review, the Journal of Banking and Finance, and the Journal of International Business Studies. Haber's most recent book, Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit (coauthored with Charles Calomiris) was published by Princeton University Press in 2014. His current research focuses on two areas: the impact of geography on the long-run evolution of economic and political institutions; and the political conditions under which societies sustain intellectual property systems that promote innovation.

  • Heather Hadlock

    Heather Hadlock

    Associate Professor of Music

    BioSpecial fields: 18th- and 19th-century French and Italian opera, feminist criticism and gender studies, and French Romanticism. Her current research encompasses Italian bel canto, Berlioz, Offenbach, operatic masculinities, opera in the digital age, and divas and technology.

    Publications: Mad Loves: Women and Music in Offenbach’s "Les Contes d’Hoffmann" (Princeton University Press, 2000) and chapters in Rethinking Difference in Music Scholarship (Cambridge University Press, 2015); Music's Obedient Daughter: The Opera Libretto from Source to Score (Rodopi, 2014); The Cambridge Companion to Rossini (Cambridge University Press, 2003); Women’s Voices Across Musical Worlds (Northeastern University Press, 2003); Berlioz: Past Present, Future (U of Rochester Press, 2003); Siren Songs (Princeton University Press, 2000). She wrote the annotated bibliography on "Women and Music" for the Oxford Bibliographies Online: Music (Oxford University Press, 2011). Articles and reviews in Cambridge Opera Journal, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Journal of Musicological Research, repercussions, Opera Quarterly.

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor in Environmental Biology, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research of Elizabeth Hadly probes how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of vertebrates.

  • Jens Hainmueller

    Jens Hainmueller

    Professor of Political Science and, by courtesy, of Political Economics at the Graduate School of Business

    BioJens Hainmueller is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

    His research interests include statistical methods, immigration, political economy, and political behavior. He has published over 30 articles, many of them in leading journals in political science, economics, and statistics, such as the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Review of Economics and Statistics, Political Analysis, Management Science, and International Organization. He has also published three open source software packages and his research has received multiple awards from the American Political Science Association, the Society of Political Methodology, and the Midwest Political Science Association.

    Hainmueller received his PhD from Harvard University and also studied at the London School of Economics, Brown University, and the University of Tübingen. Before joining Stanford, he served on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • Robert Hall

    Robert Hall

    Robert and Carole McNeil Professor and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioI’m an applied economist with interests in employment, technology, competition, and economic policy in the aggregate economy and in particular markets.

    I served as President of the American Economic Association for the year 2010. I presented the Ely Lecture to the Association in 2001 and served as Vice President in 2005. I’m a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Distinguished Fellow of the AEA, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the Society of Labor Economists.

    Along with my Hoover Institution colleague Alvin Rabushka, I developed a framework for equitable and efficient consumption taxation. Our article in the Wall Street Journal in December 1981 was the starting point for an upsurge of interest in consumption taxation. Our book, The Flat Tax (free download from the Hoover Institution Press) spells out the proposal. We were recognized in Money magazine’s Hall of Fame for our contributions to financial innovation.

    Marc Lieberman and I have a college textbook, Economics: Principles and Applications, now in its sixth edition.

    I also served as director of the research program on economic fluctuations and growth of the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1977 through 2013. I continue to serve as chairman of the Bureau's Committee on Business Cycle Dating, which maintains the semiofficial chronology of the U.S. business cycle.

    I have advised a number of government agencies on national economic policy, including the Justice Department, the Treasury Department, the Federal Reserve Board, and the Congressional Budget Office, where I serve on the Advisory Committee. I served on the National Presidential Advisory Committee on Productivity. I have testified on numerous occasions before congressional committees concerning national economic policy.

    Before coming to Stanford’s Hoover Institution and the Department of Economics in 1978, I taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at the University of California, Berkeley. I was born in Palo Alto, attended school there and in Los Angeles, received my B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and my Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    In a 1976 paper, I introduced the distinction between fresh-water and salt-water economists. Bloggers using these terms are asked to contribute $1 to a fund that sends graduate students to MIT for one year and to the University of Minnesota for a second year.

    I am married to economist Susan Woodward, chairman of Sand Hill Econometrics, and live in Menlo Park, California. Visit our blog for pictures and information about our visits to places with villages, ruins, and good food.

  • James Hamilton

    James Hamilton

    Hearst Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioJames T. Hamilton is the Hearst Professor of Communication and the Director of the Journalism Program. His books on media markets and information provision include All the News That’s Fit to Sell: How the Market Transforms Information into News (Princeton, 2004), Regulation Through Revelation: The Origin, Politics, and Impacts of the Toxics Release Inventory Program (Cambridge, 2005), and Channeling Violence: The Economic Market for Violent Television Programming (Princeton, 1998). He is currently working on a book about economic markets for investigative reporting and (with coauthor Fiona Morgan) a book about the information lives of low-income individuals. Through research in the field of computational journalism, he is also exploring how the costs of story discovery can be lowered through better use of data and algorithms.

    For his accomplishments in research, he has won awards such as the David N Kershaw Award of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the Goldsmith Book Prize from the Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center, the Frank Luther Mott Research Award, and a Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences Fellowship. Teaching awards from Duke and Harvard include the Allyn Young Prize for Excellence in Teaching the Principles of Economics, Trinity College Distinguished Teaching Award, Bass Society of Fellows, and Susan Tifft Undergraduate Teaching and Mentoring Award.

    Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Hamilton taught at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy, where he directed the De Witt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy. He earned a BA in Economics and Government (summa cum laude) and PhD in Economics from Harvard University.