School of Humanities and Sciences


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  • Vincent Barletta

    Vincent Barletta

    Associate Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    BioVincent Barletta is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Iberian and Latin American Cultures. He is a Research Associate at Stanford's Europe Center and associated faculty in the Center for African Studies, the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, the Mediterranean Studies Forum and the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. He is also Executive Editor of the Journal of Lusophone Studies and ILAC Undergraduate Chair. His research and teaching focus primarily on medieval and early modern Iberian and Ibero-American literature, especially texts associated with the Portuguese empire; classical reception; comparative literature; literature and linguistic anthropology; literature and philosophy.

  • Roland Greene

    Roland Greene

    Mark Pigott KBE Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Anthony P. Meier Family Professor in the Humanities, and Director, Humanities Center, Professor of Comparative Lit and, by courtesy, of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioRoland Greene's research and teaching are concerned with the early modern literatures of England, Latin Europe, and the transatlantic world, and with poetry and poetics from the Renaissance to the present.

    His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). Five Words proposes an understanding of early modern culture through the changes embodied in five words or concepts over the sixteenth century: in English, blood, invention, language, resistance, and world, and their counterparts in French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese.

    Other books include Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (Chicago, 1999), which follows the love poetry of the Renaissance into fresh political and colonial contexts in the New World; and Post-Petrarchism: Origins and Innovations of the Western Lyric Sequence (Princeton, 1991), a transhistorical and comparative study of lyric poetics through the fortunes of the lyric sequence from Petrarch to Neruda. Greene is the editor with Elizabeth Fowler of The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, 1997). His recent essays deal with topics such as the colonial baroque, Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene and Amoretti, Sir Thomas Wyatt's poetry, and Shakespeare's The Tempest.

    Greene is editor in chief of the fourth edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, which was published in 2012. Prepared in collaboration with the general editor Stephen Cushman and the associate editors Clare Cavanagh, Jahan Ramazani, and Paul Rouzer, this edition represents a complete revision of the most authoritative reference book on poetry and poetics.

    Greene is the founder and director of Arcade, a digital salon for literary studies and the humanities.

    In 2015-16 he served as President of the Modern Language Association, the largest scholarly organization in the world.

    At Stanford Greene is co-chair and founder of three research workshops in which most of his Ph.D. students participate. Renaissances brings together early modernists from the Bay Area to discuss work in progress, while the Poetics Workshop provides a venue for innovative scholarship in the broad field of international and historical poetics. A third research group, on Transamerican Studies, began its work in the autumn of 2009 and is now on hiatus.

    Greene has taught at Harvard and Oregon, where for six years he was chair of the Department of Comparative Literature. He has held fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Danforth Foundation, among others. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Hector Hoyos

    Hector Hoyos

    Associate Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioHéctor Hoyos is an Associate Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (Columbia UP, 2015), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He edited the special journal issues "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos (with Marília Librandi-Rocha, 2014) and “La cultura material en las literaturas y cultura iberoamericanas de hoy” for Cuadernos de literatura (2016).

    His current manuscript, Things with a History: Transcultural Materialism in Latin America develops the concept of transculturation as a way of integrating new and historical strands of materialism in the study of narrative. The study focuses on post-1989 authors who rethink materiality, such as the Cuban José Antonio Ponte, the Chilean Alejandro Zambra, and the Bolivian Blanca Wiethüchter. Hoyos received an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation fellowship in connection with this project. Articles by Hoyos have appeared in Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, Novel: A Forum on Fiction, and Revista Iberoamericana, among others.