School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 23 Results

  • James A. Fox

    James A. Fox

    Associate Professor of Anthropology and, by courtesy, of Iberian and Latin American Cultures and of Linguistics

    BioI am a linguistic anthropologist in the Department of Anthropology, with a courtesy appointment in the Department of Linguistics, specializing in historical linguistics, linguistic prehistory, and the native languages of the Americas. My research interests are focused on the history of the Mayan and Mixe-Zoquean language families, distant languagec relationships in the Americas and elsewhere, and the decipherment of Maya writing. I am currently working on: a dictionary and grammar of Ayapa Zoque; a treatise on Mayan historical linguistics, a translation of the Quiché mythological epic Popol Vuh and an accompanying multi-media program, a book on the inscriptions of Chichén Itzá, a decipherment project involving ancient Maya star and planetary lore, and a quantitative computer analysis of a newly-discovered sound pattern in Mayan languages. I have recently completed a fourth summer of linguistic fieldwork in southern Mexico, where I worked intensively with a few speakers of Ayapa Zoque, a nearly-extinct language of the Zoquean family, believed to be descendants of the language of the Olmec civilization. This research was first conducted as a part of the Mesoamerican Languages Documentation Project, and later by the Stanford Center for Latin American Studies, of which I was Director from 2001-2004. In Summer 2006 I will be conducting a brief fifth season of field research in Ayapa. I have also conducted archival and field research on various Mayan languages, and on Russenorsk, a mixed Russo-Norwegian language in northern Norway. I have compiled a field checklist for use in preparing for fieldwork. I keep it pretty much up to date and appreciate feedback from folks who have used it in their own preparations. I served as a principal consultant on Patricia Amlin's film, Popol Vuh: Creation Myth of the Ancient Maya , which aired on PBS. In the summer of 1994, I was a consultant for the Stanford Museum of Art's special exhibit on the Mesoamerican ball game. I have also consulted on middle- and secondary-school course materials involving Mesoamerican prehistory. I teach undergraduate and graduate courses at Stanford on linguistic anthropology, historical linguistics, language and culture, the biology and evolution of language, Maya writing and culture, and several Latin American Indian languages, including Nahuatl, Yucatec Maya, and Quiché Maya. I have given two sophomore seminars and one freshman seminar involving my research on the Popol Vuh and multimedia, and will launch a new sophomore seminar spring 2006 on Language and the Brain. I was also one of the developers and first track chair for the Anthropology track of Stanford's full-year Culture, Ideas, and Values courses. I am a frequent lecturer on tours of Mesoamerica and Scandinavia for the Stanford Alumni Association.

  • Roland Greene

    Roland Greene

    Mark Pigott KBE Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Professor of Comparative Literature and, by courtesy, of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioRoland Greene's research and teaching are concerned with the early modern literatures of England, Latin Europe, and the transatlantic world, and with poetry and poetics from the Renaissance to the present.

    His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). Five Words proposes an understanding of early modern culture through the changes embodied in five words or concepts over the sixteenth century: in English, blood, invention, language, resistance, and world, and their counterparts in French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese.

    Other books include Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (Chicago, 1999), which follows the love poetry of the Renaissance into fresh political and colonial contexts in the New World; and Post-Petrarchism: Origins and Innovations of the Western Lyric Sequence (Princeton, 1991), a transhistorical and comparative study of lyric poetics through the fortunes of the lyric sequence from Petrarch to Neruda. Greene is the editor with Elizabeth Fowler of The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, 1997). His recent essays deal with topics such as the colonial baroque, Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene and Amoretti, Sir Thomas Wyatt's poetry, and Shakespeare's The Tempest.

    Greene is editor in chief of the fourth edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, which was published in October 2012. Prepared in collaboration with the general editor Stephen Cushman and the associate editors Clare Cavanagh, Jahan Ramazani, and Paul Rouzer, this edition represents a complete revision of the most authoritative reference book on poetry and poetics.

    Greene is the founder and director of Arcade, a digital salon for literary studies and the humanities.

    In 2015-16 he served as President of the Modern Language Association, the largest scholarly organization in the world.

    At Stanford Greene is co-chair and founder of three research workshops in which most of his Ph.D. students participate. Renaissances brings together early modernists from the Bay Area to discuss work in progress, while the Poetics Workshop provides a venue for innovative scholarship in the broad field of international and historical poetics. A third research group, on Transamerican Studies, began its work in the autumn of 2009 and is now on hiatus.

    Greene has taught at Harvard and Oregon, where for six years he was chair of the Department of Comparative Literature. He has held fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Danforth Foundation, among others. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Héctor Hoyos

    Héctor Hoyos

    Associate Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioHéctor Hoyos is Assistant Professor of Latin American literature at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (Columbia UP, 2015), examines post-1989 Latin American novels of globalization and their relevance for world literature. He is the co-editor of the special issue "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos. His second monograph project, for which he has received an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, develops the concept of transculturation as a way of integrating new and historical strands of materialism in the study of narrative.

    Hoyos is a Delegate Assembly Representative for the Division Executive Committee on 20th Century Latin American Literature at the MLA and a past board member and Secretary for the Colombianists Association. In 2012-2013, he was a faculty fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. From 2009-2012, he chaired Cultural Synchronization and Disjuncture, a multidisciplinary forum for contemporary cultural theory at the crossroads of Latin Americanism and comparatism. He currently co-chairs materia, on Latin Americanist and comparative post-anthropocentrisms.

  • Ivan Jaksic

    Ivan Jaksic

    Lecturer, Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAnnotated Edition of Andres' Bello's Cuadernos de Londres