School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-19 of 19 Results

  • Matthew Kohrman

    Matthew Kohrman

    Associate Professor of Anthropology and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMatthew Kohrman joined Stanford’s faculty in 1999. His research and writing bring multiple methods to bear on the ways health, culture, and politics are interrelated. Focusing on the People's Republic of China, he engages various intellectual terrains such as governmentality, gender theory, political economy, critical science studies, and embodiment. His first monograph, Bodies of Difference: Experiences of Disability and Institutional Advocacy in the Making of Modern China, examines links between the emergence of a state-sponsored disability-advocacy organization and the lives of Chinese men who have trouble walking. In recent years, Kohrman has been conducting research projects aimed at analyzing and intervening in the biopolitics of cigarette smoking and production. These projects expand upon analytical themes of Kohrman’s disability research and engage in novel ways techniques of public health.

  • Charles Kolstad

    Charles Kolstad

    Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, at the Precourt Institute for Energy and at the Woods Institute for the Enviornment and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are broadly in environmental economics and related areas of industrial organization and public economics. My policy-related focus within these fields is climate change and energy markets.

    I currently have several projects related to uncertainty and learning in strategic contexts regarding the provision of public goods. For the most part, the application is international environmental agreements. This work is primarily theoretical, though with some empirical and experimental work to validate and illuminate theory. I also have research interests in energy economics (particularly regulation) and other dimensions of the economics of climate change.

    I welcome new PhD students who wish to study with me. Typically, my students train to be environmental or resource economists, which means they receive strong training in economics. At Stanford this means successfully taking the first year PhD sequences in microeconomics (Econ 202-204) and econometrics (Econ 270-272) offered by the Department of Economics. In addition, students should take the PhD classes Economics 250 (Environmental Economics) and 251 (Resource and Energy Economics). This is a minimum and other coursework would depend on student interest and needs. Strong preparation in math is essential.

    There are a number of PhD programs at Stanford that are appropriate for someone seeking training as an environmental economist. In addition to the Department of Economics, there are several other departments in which students may apply and matriculate, including the Emmet Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER).

    Working Papers

  • Sylvia Kreibig

    Sylvia Kreibig

    Sr Res Scholar

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy major research interests are on the elicitation, differentiation, and response patterning of emotion. My research particularly addresses questions regarding cognitive-motivational processes that underlie the elicitation and differentiation of emotion. To assess emotional processes, I use both self-report measures of emotional feelings as well as psychophysiological variables in my research.

  • Jon Krosnick

    Jon Krosnick

    Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor of Communication and of Political Science and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    BioJon Krosnick is a social psychologist who does research on attitude formation, change, and effects, on the psychology of political behavior, and on survey research methods. He is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor of Communication, Political Science, and (by courtesy) Psychology. At Stanford, in addition to his professorships, he directs the Political Psychology Research Group and the Summer Institute in Political Psychology.

    To read reports on Professor Krosnick’s research program exploring public opinion on the environment visit the Woods Institute for the Environment and the Public Opinion on Climate Change web sites.

    Research Interests
    Author of four books and more than 140 articles and chapters, Dr. Krosnick conducts research in three primary areas: (1) attitude formation, change, and effects, (2) the psychology of political behavior, and (3) the optimal design of questionnaires used for laboratory experiments and surveys, and survey research methodology more generally.

    His attitude research has focused primarily on the notion of attitude strength, seeking to differentiate attitudes that are firmly crystallized and powerfully influential of thinking and action from attitudes that are flexible and inconsequential. Many of his studies in this area have focused on the amount of personal importance that an individual chooses to attach to an attitude. Dr. Krosnick’s studies have illuminated the origins of attitude importance (e.g., material self-interest and values) and the cognitive and behavioral consequences of importance in regulating attitude impact and attitude change processes.

    Honors
    Dr. Krosnick’s scholarship has been recognized by election as a fellow by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Erik Erikson Early Career Award for Excellence and Creativity in the Field of Political Psychology from the International Society of Political Psychology, a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Phillip Brickman Memorial Prize for Research in Social Psychology, the American Political Science Association’s Best Paper Award, the American Association for Public Opinion Research Student Paper Award, the Midwest Political Science Association’s Pi Sigma Alpha Award, and the University of Wisconsin’s Brittingham Visiting Scholar Position.