School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 41-52 of 52 Results

  • Nancy de Wit

    Nancy de Wit

    Victoria and Roger Sant Professor of Art, Emerita

    BioNancy J. Troy is Victoria and Roger Sant Professor in Art and Chair of the Art & Art History Department at Stanford University. In addition to The De Stijl Environment (MIT Press, 1983), she is the author of Modernism and the Decorative Arts in France: Art Nouveau to Le Corbusier (Yale University Press, 1991), Couture Culture: A Study in Modern Art and Fashion(MIT Press, 2003), and, most recently, The Afterlife of Piet Mondrian(University of Chicago Press, 2013). In this book about Mondrian after his death in 1944, Troy examines the trajectories of the artist's work and legacy as they circulated through the realms of elite and popular culture, and she explores the ways in which the dominant historical narrative of Mondrian and his work has been shaped by art-market forces.

    Professor Troy received her PhD from Yale University in 1979, and thereafter taught at The Johns Hopkins University (1979-83), Northwestern University (1983-93), and the University of Southern California (1994-2010). A past president of the National Committee for the History of Art, she was Editor-in-Chief of the flagship art history journal, The Art Bulletin, from 1994 to 1997. She has been awarded many fellowships, most notably from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Getty Research Institute, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts.

    At Stanford, Professor Troy teaches courses on modern European and American art, architecture and design; cubism; modern art and fashion; art, business and the law; the art market, and topics generated by the collections and exhibitions of the Cantor Arts Center and the Art and Architecture Library.

  • Jeanne L. Tsai

    Jeanne L. Tsai

    Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines how culture shapes affective processes (emotions, moods, feelings) and the implications cultural differences in these processes have for what decisions people make, how people think about health and illness, and how people perceive and respond to others in an increasingly multicultural world.

  • Albert Tsao

    Albert Tsao

    Basic Life Research Scientist

    BioHoward Hughes Medical Institute Fellow of The Helen Hay Whitney Foundation

  • Edison Tse

    Edison Tse

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Edison Tse received his BS, MS, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the Director of Asia Center of Management Science and Engineering, which has the charter of developing executive training programs for executives in Asian enterprises, conducting research on development of the emerging economy in Asia and establishing research affiliations with Asian enterprises, with a special focus in Greater China: China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
    In 1973, he received the prestigious Donald Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in recognition of his outstanding contribution in the field of Automatic Control. He had served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of Automatic Control, and a co-editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, which he co-founded.
    Professor Tse has done research in system and control engineering, economic dynamics and control, computer integrated systems to support fishery management policy decisions, management and control of manufacturing enterprise, and industrial competitive analysis and product development. Tse developed a framework for analyzing dynamic competitive strategy that would shape the formation of an ecosystem supporting a value proposition. Within such a framework, he developed dynamic strategies for firms entering an emerging market, latecomers entering a matured market, and firms managing transformation. Using this framework, he developed a new theory on the business transformation of a company and the economic transformation of a developing economy. He applied his theory to explain China’s rapid growth since 1978, changing from a production economy to an innovation economy. His current research is extending the theory to managing product success, managing inflection point disruptions, sustainable growth strategy in a dynamic changing environment, and industries’ strategy responding to geopolitics disruption. Over the years he has made valuable contributions in the field of engineering, economics, and business creation and expansion. He has published over 180 papers on his research activities.
    From 2004- 2015, he co-directed various Stanford-China programs on regional industry and enterprise transformation that were attended by high level city officials from various cities in China and high level executives from Chinese enterprises. From 2007-2013, he co-directed a Stanford Financial Engineering Certificate Program in Hong Kong that upgrades the quality of managers and traders in the financial institutions in Hong Kong
    He was a co-founder and a Board member of Advanced Decision System (ADS), a technology company with emphasis on AI and advanced decision tools. The company was found in 1979 and later acquired by Booz Allen and Hamilton in 1991. In 1988, Verity was spun off from ADS with AI search engine technology developed in ADS to provide enterprise search software. He was a Board member of Verity representing ADS before Verity went IPO in 1995. From 2007-2010, he was a Board member of KBC Fund Management Co., Ltd.

  • Shripad Tuljapurkar

    Shripad Tuljapurkar

    The Dean and Virginia Morrison Professor of Population Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStochastic dynamics of human and natural populations; prehistoric societies; probability forecasts including sex ratios, mortality, aging and fiscal balance; life history evolution.

  • Serdar Tumgoren

    Serdar Tumgoren

    Lecturer

    BioSerdar Tumgoren teaches data journalism in the Stanford Graduate Journalism Program and is an associate director for Big Local News, a project at Stanford that fosters collaborative data journalism and provides tools and platforms to help local newsrooms extend their reach.

    Prior to joining Stanford in 2018, Serdar worked at The Associated Press, The Washington Post and Congressional Quarterly, with a focus on political and election-related data and Web applications.

    A graduate of Georgetown University, Serdar began his career as a local government reporter in California, Connecticut, and New Jersey.

    He is passionate about open source tools and platforms that help journalists uncover data-driven stories. He co-founded the OpenElections project, a volunteer effort to gather and standardize U.S. election data, and created datakit, a customizable tool to help journalists simplify and standardize their data analysis workflows.

  • Frederick Turner

    Frederick Turner

    Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Art and Art History and of History
    On Leave from 09/01/2022 To 08/31/2023

    BioFred Turner’s research and teaching focus on media technology and cultural change. He is especially interested in the ways that emerging media have helped shape American life since World War II.

    Turner is the author of three books: The Democratic Surround: Multimedia and American Liberalism from World War II to the Psychedelic Sixties; From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism; and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. His essays have tackled topics ranging from the rise of reality crime television to the role of the Burning Man festival in contemporary new media industries. They are available here: fredturner.stanford.edu/essays/.

    Turner’s research has received a number of academic awards and has been featured in publications ranging from Science and the New York Times to Ten Zen Monkeys. It has also been translated into French, Spanish, German, Polish and Chinese.

    Turner is also the Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a freelance journalist for ten years, writing for the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine, the Boston Phoenix, and the Pacific News Service.

    Turner earned his Ph.D. in Communication from the University of California, San Diego. He has also earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.

  • Barbara Tversky

    Barbara Tversky

    Professor of Psychology, Emerita

    BioBarbara Tversky studied cognitive psychology at the University of Michigan. She held positions first at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and then at Stanford, from 1978-2005 when she took early retirement. She is an active Emerita Professor of Psychology at Stanford and Professor of Psychology at Columbia Teachers College. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the Cognitive Science Society, the Society for Experimental Psychology, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Science, and a recipient of the Kampe de Feriat Prize. She has been on the Governing Boards of the Psychonomic Society, the Cognitive Science Society, the International Union of Psychological Science, and the Association for Psychological Science. She has served on the editorial boards of many journals and the organizing committees of dozens of international interdisciplinary meetings.

    Her research has spanned memory, categorization, language, spatial cognition, event perception and cognition, diagrammatic reasoning, sketching, creativity, design, and gesture. The overall goals have been to uncover how people think about the spaces they inhabit and the actions they perform and see and then how people use the world and the things in it, including their own actions and creations and those of others, to remember, to think, to create, to communicate. Her 2019 book, Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought, overviews some of that work. She has collaborated widely, with linguists, philosophers, neuroscientists, computer scientists, chemists, biologists, architects, designers, and artists.