School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 27 Results

  • Arto Anttila

    Arto Anttila

    Associate Professor of Linguistics
    On Leave from 04/01/2021 To 06/30/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhonology, morphology, language variation

  • Jared Bernstein

    Jared Bernstein

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVoice-interactive Virtual Screening Interviews on mobile devices.

  • Eve Clark

    Eve Clark

    Richard Lyman Professor in the Humanities, Emerita

    BioI am interested in first language acquisition, the acquisition of meaning, acquisitional principles in word-formation compared across children and languages, and general semantic and pragmatic issues in the lexicon and in language use. I am currently working on the kinds of pragmatic information adults offer small children as they talk to them, and on children's ability to make use of this information as they make inferences about unfamiliar meanings and about the relations between familiar and unfamiliar words. I am interested in the inferences children make about where to 'place' unfamiliar words, how they identify the relevant semantic domains, and what they can learn about conventional ways to say things based on adult responses to child errors during acquisition. All of these 'activities' involve children and adults placing information in common ground as they interact. Another current interest of mine is the construction of verb paradigms: how do children go from using a single verb form to using forms that contrast in meaning -- on such dimensions as person, number, and tense? How do they learn to distinguish the meanings of homophones? To what extent do they make use of adult input to discern the underlying structure of the system? And how does conversation with more expert speakers (usually adults) foster the acquisition of a first language? I am particularly interested in the general role of practice along with feedback here.

  • Penelope Eckert

    Penelope Eckert

    Albert Ray Lang Professor, Emerita

    BioThe goal of my research is to understand the social meaning of linguistic variation. In order to do this, I pursue my sociolinguistic work in the context of in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, focusing on the relation between variation, linguistic style, social identity and social practice.

    Gender has been the big misunderstood in studies of sociolinguistic variation - in spite of the fact that some of the most exciting intellectual developments over the past decades have been in theories of gender and sexuality ... so I have been spending a good deal of time working on language and gender as well.

    Since adolescents and preadolescents are the movers and shakers in linguistic change, I concentrate on this age group, and much of my research takes place in schools. The institutional research site has made me think a good deal about learning and education, but particularly about the construction of adolescence in American society.

  • Michael Frank

    Michael Frank

    David and Lucile Packard Foundation Professor in Human Biology and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we learn to communicate using language? I study children's language learning and how it interacts with their developing understanding of the social world. I use behavioral experiments, computational tools, and novel measurement methods like large-scale web-based studies, eye-tracking, and head-mounted cameras.

  • Miyako Inoue

    Miyako Inoue

    Associate Professor of Anthropology and, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    BioMiyako Inoue teaches linguistic anthropology and the anthropology of Japan. She also has a courtesy appointment with the Department of Linguistics.

    Her first book, titled, Vicarious Language: the Political Economy of Gender and Speech in Japan (University of California Press), examines a phenomenon commonly called "women's language" in Japanese modern society, and offers a genealogy showing its critical linkage with Japan's national and capitalist modernity. Professor Inoue is currently working on a book-length project on a social history of “verbatim” in Japanese. She traces the historical development of the Japanese shorthand technique used in the Diet for its proceedings since the late 19th century, and of the stenographic typewriter introduced to the Japanese court for the trial record after WWII. She is interested in learning what it means to be faithful to others by coping their speech, and how the politico-semiotic rationality of such stenographic modes of fidelity can be understood as a technology of a particular form of governance, namely, liberal governance. Publication that has come out of her current project includes, "Stenography and Ventriloquism in Late Nineteenth Century Japan." Language & Communication 31.3 (2011).

    Professor Inoue's research interest: linguistic anthropology, sociolinguistics, semiotics, linguistic modernity, anthropology of writing, inscription devices, materialities of language, social organizations of documents (filing systems, index cards, copies, archives, paperwork), voice/sound/noise, soundscape, technologies of liberalism, gender, urban studies, Japan, East Asia.

  • Martin Kay

    Martin Kay

    Professor of Linguistics, Emeritus

    BioProf. Martin Kay is Professor of Computational Linguistics at Stanford
    U. and Honorary Professor at Saarland U. He studied at Trinity
    College, Cambridge. Kay then worked at Rand Corporation, the U. of
    California at Irvine and XEROX PARC. Kay is one of the pioneers of
    computational linguistics and machine translation. He was responsible
    for introducing the notion of chart parsing in computational
    linguistics, and the notion of unification in linguistics
    generally. With Ron Kaplan, he pioneered research and application
    development in finite-state morphology. He has been a longtime
    contributor to, and critic of, work on machine translation. In his
    seminal paper "The Proper Place of Men and Machines in Language
    Translation," Kay argued for MT systems that were tightly integrated in
    the human translation process. He was reviewer and critic of EUROTRA,
    Verbmobil, and many other MT projects. Kay is former Chair of the
    Association of Computational Linguistics and ongoing Chair of the
    International Committee on Computational Linguistics. He was a Research
    Fellow at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center until 2002. He holds an
    honorary doctorate of Gothenburg U. This year, Kay received the
    Lifetime Achievement Award of the Association for Computational
    Linguistics for his sustained role as an intellectual leader of NLP
    research.

  • Daniel Lassiter

    Daniel Lassiter

    Assistant Professor of Linguistics

    BioMy research combines formal tools and experimental methods from linguistics and other areas of cognitive science to work toward a unified theory of language understanding as a cognitive phenomenon. I've worked on a variety of topics such as the semantics of modals and degree expressions, the pragmatics of vagueness and presupposition, inductive vs. deductive reasoning, and models of various pragmatic phenomena which treat language understanding as a problem of Bayesian inference. I've argued in various domains that combining logical and probabilistic models not only achieves a desirable theoretical unification but also improved empirical coverage and new theoretical insights.

  • William R. Leben

    William R. Leben

    Professor of Linguistics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent project:
    "Advertising and the Language of Persuasion," a book for Oxford University Press based on my spring 2016-17 and 2019-20 Stanford courses

    In press:
    with Brett Kessler, the third edition of "English Vocabulary Elements," for Oxford University Press..

  • Christopher Manning

    Christopher Manning

    Thomas M. Siebel Professor in Machine Learning, Professor of Linguistics and of Computer Science

    BioChristopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Institute. He works on software that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. He is a leader in applying Deep Learning to Natural Language Processing, including exploring Tree Recursive Neural Networks, neural network dependency parsing, the GloVe model of word vectors, neural machine translation, question answering, and deep language understanding. He also focuses on computational linguistic approaches to parsing, natural language inference and multilingual language processing, including being a principal developer of Stanford Dependencies and Universal Dependencies. Manning is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, an ACL Fellow, and a Past President of ACL. He has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is the founder of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp) and manages development of the Stanford CoreNLP software.

  • Yoshiko Matsumoto

    Yoshiko Matsumoto

    Yamato Ichihashi Chair in Japanese History and Civilization and Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBased on in-depth analyses of Japanese with a cross-linguistic perspective, my research emphasizes the importance of linguistic and extralinguistic context in understanding the structure, meaning and use of language. I have worked on the pragmatics of linguistic constructions (e.g. frame semantics of noun-modifying construction, reference, honorifics, discourse markers) and sociocultural aspects of discourse (e.g. politeness theories, speech acts, bilingualism, intersection of language, gender and age, ideology, and identity reflected in Japanese as a second language). Topics of my current research center around conversational narratives especially of older adults and disaster survivors – (re)framing of narratives, ordinariness, stances taken by participants, integration of pragmatic factors in Construction Grammar, and typology and functions of noun-modifying constructions.

  • Jay McClelland

    Jay McClelland

    Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research addresses topics in perception and decision making; learning and memory; language and reading; semantic cognition; and cognitive development. I view cognition as emerging from distributed processing activity of neural populations, with learning occurring through the adaptation of connections among neurons. A new focus of research in the laboratory is mathematical cognition, with an emphasis on the learning and representation of mathematical concepts and relationships.