School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 91 Results

  • Andrew Bauer

    Andrew Bauer

    Assistant Professor of Anthropology

    BioAndrew Bauer is an anthropological archaeologist whose research and teaching interests broadly focus on the archaeology of human-environment relations, including the socio-politics of land use and both symbolic and material aspects of producing spaces, places, and landscapes. Andrew's primary research is based in South India, where he co-directs fieldwork investigating the relationships between landscape history, cultural practices, and institutionalized forms of social inequalities and difference during the region’s Neolithic, Iron Age, Early Historic, and Medieval periods. As an extension of his archaeological work he is also interested in the intersections of landscape histories and modern framings of nature that relate to conservation politics and climate change.

  • Emily Bishop

    Emily Bishop

    Computing Info Systems Analyst, Anthropology

    BioEmily is a Computing Support Analyst for the Department of Anthropology. She supports the overall computing and technology needs of the department including developing and maintaining department websites, providing technical support to faculty, students, and staff, and working with IT Services to roll out university-wide mandates. Emily also works as a Financial Analyst for the department, responsible for the post-award management of a large, complex sponsored research project.

    Emily has a Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration from the University of British Columbia and worked in the high tech industry for over 10 years before coming to Stanford.

  • Miray Cakiroglu

    Miray Cakiroglu

    Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioMy research revolves around the constitutive role of ruins, as a specific genre of objects, in the spatial organization of politics at multiple scales and in a historical continuum. As the constructed cultural progenitor of western Europe, the Mediterranean region occupies a special place in discussions of heritage with its extensive ruin landscapes. The search for the material remains of antiquity motivated much of travel eastward, shaping the archaeological imaginary in the discipline’s early days. I focus on the shifting trajectory of the meaning of ruins as they move from one context to another. I am specifically interested in the imperial encounters of the 19th century on what is now the Turkish Aegean and the afterlives of ruins in new sociopolitical frameworks. I am also interested in the territorial imagination of homelands and borderlands in relation to politics of death, dying, and martyrdom.

    I received my B.A. in English Literature with a double major in Philosophy from Bogazici University. I completed an M.A. in Cultural Studies at the same university with a thesis on the formulation of urban space and urban citizen in the coursebooks of “Istanbul courses.” I hold another M.A. in Near Eastern Studies from New York University, where I focused on the mobility of a Seljuk sultan’s tomb in Syria, presently a Turkish territory outside national borders, in its relation to nationalism and place-making. I have two poetry books published in Turkish, one of which is the recipient of the prestigious Yasar Nabi Nayir Youth Award.