School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 51-100 of 104 Results

  • Javier Mejia

    Javier Mejia

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioJavier Mejia is an economist whose work focuses on the intersection between social networks and economic history. His interests extend to topics on entrepreneurship and political economy with a geographical specialty in Latin America and the Middle East. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Los Andes University. He has been a Postdoctoral Associate and Lecturer at New York University--Abu Dhabi and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Bordeaux.

    Most of Javier’s research explores how social interactions have shaped the economy in the long term. He brings together theoretical and empirical methods from economics and conceptual tools from anthropology to the study of history. This has led him to explore an extensive set of historical objects. He has studied entrepreneurs in Colombia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, industrial elites in Morocco in the late 20th century, tribal societies in North Africa in the 19th century, early Muslim communities in the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula between the 7th and 9th centuries, and political elites in Colombia and the US in the early 19th century.

    Javier has teaching experience in multicultural environments, having taught at universities in Latin America, the United States, and the Middle East. He has taught courses on economic growth, economic history, and economic theory. At Stanford, he offers two courses that jointly provide an overview of economic evolution from a global-history and moral-philosophy perspective. On the one hand, Wealth of Nations studies the origins of economic development, the moral dilemmas underneath the development process, and the path that led to the configuration of the modern global economy. On the other hand, Societal Collapse studies the causes of economic decline, the social and political consequences of that decline, and the path that led to the disappearance of some of the most prosperous societies in human history.

    Javier is a regular contributor to different news outlets. Currently, he is a Forbes Magazine op-ed columnist.

  • Pardis Miri

    Pardis Miri

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioPardis Miri, PhD, recently received her doctorate in computer science, in the area of human computer interaction, from University of California Santa Cruz. As a PhD student, she spent the last 3 years of her training at Stanford University under the supervision of Dr. Marzullo, Dr. Gross, and Dr. Isbister. For her dissertation, she took a multidisciplinary approach in using technology for affect regulation. More specifically, she explored the placement and pattern, and personalization of a vibrotactile breathing pacer system that she developed during her graduate studies. Her work was funded by the National Science Foundation and Intel labs. Prior to being a Ph.D. student, Miri earned her Master’s degree in computer science from the University of California San Diego in the area of Systems and Networking. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University conducting research in using vibrotactile technology to aid affect regulation in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations.

  • Martin Noergaard

    Martin Noergaard

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioMartin Noergaard is a biomedical engineer (BSc and MSc) by training from the Technical University of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen, specializing in medical imaging, biomedical signal processing and machine learning. Next, he did his PhD in neuroscience with the title "optimizing preprocessing pipelines in PET/MR neuroimaging" at the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with University of Toronto, and the Martinos Center (MGH/Harvard-MIT). Martin finished his PhD in only 2.5 years. Martin has a strong expertise in medical image analysis and statistics, and is heavily involved in data sharing initiatives (USA, UK & EU), evaluation/optimization of data analysis pipelines for PET/MRI/fMRI brain imaging (multiverse analyses), and development of open source tools and software for analyzing neuroimaging data.

    Thesis link: https://nru.dk/index.php/misc?task=download.send&id=644&catid=4&m=0

  • Rui Pei

    Rui Pei

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioRui (/ˈreɪ/) received her B.Sc. in Cognitive Neuroscience from Brown University, and her Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Pennsylvania. She is interested in understanding how adolescents and young adults make social decisions in the context of psychological and neural development. Her research focuses on social risk taking, or risk taking behaviors that bring social consequences. Some of the questions that her research tries to answer include: what motivates people to take social risks, and how does social risk taking contribute to adolescent health and well-being?

  • Juan Felipe Riaño

    Juan Felipe Riaño

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Economics

    BioJuan Felipe Riaño is a postdoctoral fellow at the King Center. He is an applied microeconomist with research interests spanning the fields of political economy, development economics, and economic history. His current research agenda focuses on understanding the determinants of state capacity in developing countries and the long-term impact of conflict and historical institutions on economic development. More recently, he has been interested in the organizational economics of public sector institutions and the role of cybersecurity in modern states. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of British Columbia in 2022 and will join the economics department at Georgetown University as an assistant professor in August 2023.

  • J. Luis Rodriguez

    J. Luis Rodriguez

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI have a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Johns Hopkins University. My research centers on how developing countries build and maintain limits on the use of force in international law. I focus on the origins of the nuclear order primarily from a Latin American perspective. My work reconstructs the attempts of the Brazilian and Mexican governments to delegitimize the threat and use of nuclear force while securing access to peaceful nuclear technologies. By analyzing the Latin American participation in the crafting of nuclear weapon nonproliferation treaties, I aim to understand how developing countries react when technological advancements challenge existing limits on the use of force.

    I served as a Nuclear Security Fellow with the Fundação Getulio Vargas in São Paulo, Brazil. Before joining the Ph.D. program at Hopkins, I was a junior advisor to the Mexican Vice-Minister for Latin American Affairs, working on international security cooperation in the region.

  • Pilleriin Sikka

    Pilleriin Sikka

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPilleriin's main research interests focus on emotions and emotion regulation, mental well-being, sleep and dreaming, and consciousness. More specifically, she conducts research on the nature and continuity of emotions and emotion regulation across the wake-sleep cycle and how these are related to health and well-being. She also strives to understand the psychology and neurobiology of peace of mind as an aspect of mental well-being. In her research Pilleriin uses a multidisciplinary and multilevel framework that draws on the concepts, theories, and methods from the fields of philosophy, psychology, (affective) neuroscience, and (molecular) biology, and integrates different research areas, such as emotion research, sleep and dream research, consciousness research, and well-being research.

  • Fatima Suarez

    Fatima Suarez

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Sociology

    BioFatima Suarez is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research. Her areas of expertise include gender, intersectionalities, families, Latina/o sociology, and social movements.

    Fatima’s work investigates how men navigate the structural and cultural landscapes that shape their intimate lives. Fatherhood, in particular, is a point of entry into men’s intimate lives. Her current project considers contemporary practices and ideologies of fatherhood among Latino men and reflects the intricacies of inequality in family life. This is the first systematic empirical study to analyze the social forces that shape, sustain, and undermine involved fathering for Latino men. Fatima’s work has been supported by an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Latino Studies at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, NM. She has also received recognition from the Ford Foundation and the American Sociological Association.

    Fatima’s previous work on Chicana feminisms and Chicana and Latina women’s activism has been published in the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social & Political Movements and in the anthology, Nevertheless, They Persisted: Feminisms and Continued Resistance in the U.S. Women's Movement, edited by Jo Reger.

  • Lauren Sukin

    Lauren Sukin

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI am a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University.

    In my research, I examine issues of international security, focusing on the role of nuclear weapons in international politics. Specifically, I am interested in analyzing how nuclear states communicate credibility and enforce commitments in three contexts: 1) demonstrations of resolve, 2) crisis escalation, and 3) nuclear nonproliferation. My dissertation studies demonstrations of resolve in the context of U.S. extended deterrence on the Korean Peninsula. While most previous work in the nuclear policy realm has been limited by studying very few cases at the state level, I use large-N survey experiments, computational text analysis of archival sources, and tools for small-N causal inference to gain new insights on these topics. I couple these methods with detailed case studies and other qualitative approaches. My research agenda explores the dynamics of nuclear weapons, crisis politics, and conflict studies. In particular, I am interested in continuing to study these subjects in relation to pressing issues in contemporary U.S. foreign policy.

    I graduated from Brown University in 2016 with B.A.s in Political Science and Literary Arts.

    As an advisor for FLI (first-generation/low-income) students and a queer woman, I welcome opportunities to discuss applying to Stanford's PhD programs in Political Science with diverse prospective students. Please feel free to reach out via email with "Prospective Student" as the subject line if you have any questions.

  • Armin Thomas

    Armin Thomas

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI am a Ram and Vijay Shriram Data Science Fellow at Stanford Data Science, where I work with Russ Poldrack. My research is located at the intersection of machine learning, neuroscience, and psychology. I am interested in using machine learning techniques to better understand neuroimaging data and human cognitive processes. In my past work, I have explored the cognitive processes underlying simple economic choices and developed computational frameworks that utilize deep learning methods to analyze whole-brain functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data.

    Prior to coming to Stanford, I obtained a PhD in machine learning from Technische Universität Berlin, as well as a MSc in cognitive neuroscience and a BSc in psychology from Freie Universität Berlin. I was also active as a mentor for the Max Planck School of Cognition, and as a researcher for the California Institute of Technology and Max Planck Institute for Human Development.

  • Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI completed my undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, and my PhD at the University of Cambridge. My work explores the neural mechanisms supporting episodic memory, and how these are affected by aging and Alzheimer's disease. I am currently leading the Stanford Aging and Memory Study, a large-scale longitudinal project examining individual differences in episodic memory in older adults. My research combines structural and functional MRI, PET imaging, and analysis of molecular and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

  • Alessandro Vecchiato

    Alessandro Vecchiato

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioAlessandro Vecchiato is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Program for Democracy and the Internet at Stanford. He received his Ph.D. in Politics from New York University in 2019 with a dissertation on the impact of new media and technology on political outcomes, such as voters preferences, political participation and news consumption, and more broadly their impact on civil society. His postdoc fellowship project includes a number of studies aimed at understanding how to better design internet media, including social media and mobile communication app, to foster civil public dialogue and fight misinformation. His doctoral research has already used a custom-developed app, Dossier, to experiment on the best modalities to deliver new, and especially, to test the consequences of algorithmic biases online. During his postdoctoral time at Stanford, he plans to expand on this body of work to detect strategies and develop technological tools that citizens can use to receive more accurate and balanced news diets.

  • Chunchen Xu

    Chunchen Xu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI am currently a researcher at the Psychology Department at Stanford University. I’m broadly interested in the social psychological impact of smart technology. In particular, I explore cultural assumptions underlying conceptions of smart technology in different groups and societies—how do pre-existing cultural worldviews and values afford people to imagine, design, and interact with smart technology in different ways? Whose cultures are represented and promoted by the deployment of smart technology? I believe unpacking these cultural assumptions is critical to reflecting on the purposes of smart technology so as to guide its development to serve a broader range of the population in society.

    I received my Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from Stanford Graduate School of Business, where I was lucky to be advised by Prof. Brian Lowery. After that, I have been working with Prof. Hazel Markus on research related to culture, creativity, and smart technology. My work has been supported by the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI), Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS), and Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research Program (HPDTRP).

    Prior to Stanford, I completed a Bachelor’s degree in China. I also obtained Master’s degrees in Anthropology and in Human Resources and Industrial Relations respectively.