School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 41-50 of 74 Results

  • Terry Moe

    Terry Moe

    William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe presidency, American political institutions, education politics.

  • Thomas Mullaney

    Thomas Mullaney

    Professor of History and, by courtesy, of East Asian Languages and Cultures

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThomas S. Mullaney is Associate Professor of Chinese History at Stanford University. He is the author of Coming to Terms with the Nation: Ethnic Classification in Modern China and principal editor of Critical Han Studies: The History, Representation and Identity of China’s Majority. He received his BA and MA degrees from the Johns Hopkins University, and his PhD from Columbia University under the direction of Madeleine Zelin.

    His most recent project, The Chinese Typewriter: A Global History, examines China’s development of a modern, nonalphabetic information infrastructure encompassing telegraphy, typewriting, word processing, and computing. This project has received three major awards and fellowships, including the 2013 Usher Prize, a three-year National Science Foundation fellowship, and a Hellman Faculty Fellowship. The book manuscript is about to be submitted for formal editorial review.

    He also directs DHAsia, a new Digital Humanities initiative at Stanford University focused on East, South, Southeast, and Inner/Central Asia. The program is supported by the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA). DHAsia 2016 will center around a series of intellectually intensive 3-day visits by a core group of scholars incorporating three components: (a) a 45-minute talk on their research; (b) a hands-on Digital Humanities clinic for faculty and graduate students (focused on the particular tool/technique/method/platform employed in their work); and (c) a schedule of one-on-one meetings with interested faculty and graduate student researchers.

    He is also the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Dissertation Reviews, which publishes more than 500 reviews annually of recently defended dissertations in nearly 30 different fields in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

  • Joe Nation

    Joe Nation

    Professor of the Practice of Public Policy

    BioJoe Nation is a Professor of the Practice of Public Policy at Stanford University, where he co-directs the graduate student Practicum in public policy and teaches policy courses on climate change, health care, and California state issues. He also serves as a Grossman-Kennedy Fellow in Human Biology, teaching environmental and health policy. He received the Phi Beta Kappa Undergraduate Teaching Award in 2023.

    His current research is focused on climate change and improving data-driven decisions by state governments. Nation sits on the board of Advisors for Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service and is a Faculty Affiliate at Stanford’s Center on Longevity. He has consulted for RAND for more than 30 years since his graduation from the Pardee RAND Graduate School (PRGS) in 1989.

    From 1992-2000, he served on the Marin Water Board, including two terms as President. From 2000-2006, he represented Marin and Southern Sonoma Counties in the California State Assembly. He was the principal co-author of AB 32, California’s Global Warmings Solutions Act and was selected as Legislator of the Year by a number of organizations.

  • Roger Noll

    Roger Noll

    Professor of Economics, Emeritus

    BioRoger G. Noll is professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University. Noll also is a Senior Fellow and member of the Advisory Board at the American Antitrust Institute. Noll received a B.S. with honors in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph. D. in economics from Harvard University. Prior to joining Stanford, Noll was a Senior Economist at the President's Council of Economic Advisers, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Institute Professor of Social Science and Chair of the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. At Stanford, Noll served as Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Public Policy Program, and Senior Fellow in the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research where he also was Director of the Program in Regulatory Policy and Director of the Stanford Center for International Development.

    Noll is the author or co-author of seventeen books and over three hundred articles and reviews. His primary research interests include technology policy; antitrust, regulation and privatization policies in both advanced and developing economies; economic aspects of public law (administrative law, judicial processes, and statutory interpretation); and the economics of sports and entertainment. Among Noll’s published books are Economic Aspects of Television Regulation (1973), Government and the Sports Business (1974), The Technology Pork Barrel (1991), Constitutional Reform in California (1995), Sports, Jobs and Taxes (1997), Challenges to Research Universities (1998), and Economic Reform in India (2013).

    Noll has been a member of the advisory boards of the U.S. Department of Energy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and National Science Foundation. He also has been a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy of the National Research Council, and of the California Council on Science and Technology.

    Noll has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the annual book award of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, the Rhodes Prize for undergraduate education at Stanford, the Distinguished Service Award of the Public Utilities Research Center, the Alfred E. Kahn Distinguished Career Award from the American Antitrust Institute, the Distinguished Member Award from the Transportation and Public Utilities Group of the American Economic Association, Economist of the Year from Global Competition Review, and the American Antitrust Institute award for Distinguished Achievement by an Economist in Antitrust Litigation.

  • Bruce Owen

    Bruce Owen

    Morris M. Doyle Centennial Professor in Public Policy, Emeritus

    BioBruce M. Owen is the Morris M. Doyle Professor in Public Policy, Emeritus, in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, and the Gordon Cain Senior Fellow, Emeritus, in Stanford's Institute for Economic Policy Research. For a decade ending in 2015 he was Director of the Stanford Public Policy Program. Professor Owen in 2007 led a successful effort to institute a new masters’ degree program in public policy (MPP) at Stanford. He earlier established an international reputation as an expert on antitrust economics, and was the leading academic student of the economics of mass media markets. He is regarded as a principal architect of the 1974 U.S. Department of Justice antitrust lawsuit that led to the eventual dissolution of the old Bell System, and he testified at the trial of the case in 1981. At Stanford, he has taught courses in economic analysis of law, telecommunications law and policy, and political corruption.
    Until 2003, Owen was CEO of Economists Incorporated, a Washington DC consulting firm specializing in antitrust and regulatory policy analysis. Before co-founding Economists Incorporated in 1981, he was the Chief Economist of the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and, earlier, of the White House Office of Telecommunications Policy. He was also a faculty member in the Schools of Business and Law at Duke University and the department of economics at Stanford University. Owen was graduated from Williams College in 1965 with a B.A. in economics and from Stanford in 1970 with a Ph.D., also in economics. He was a Woodrow Wilson Fel-low.
    Professor Owen was the author or co-author of numerous articles and eight books, including Television Economics (1974), Economics and Freedom of Expression (1975), The Regulation Game (1978), The Political Economy of Deregulation (1983), Video Economics (1992) and Electric Utility Mergers: Principles of Antitrust Analysis (1994). He was an expert witness in several antitrust and regulatory proceedings. In addition to United States v. AT&T, these included United States Football League v. National Football League, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission review of Southern California Edison’s proposed acquisition of San Diego Gas and Electric Co.
    In 1992 Owen headed a World Bank task force that advised Argentina's government in drafting a new antitrust law. He also advised government agencies in Mexico and the U.S. on telecommunications policy and in Peru on antitrust policy. He was a consultant to the World Bank concerning the economic evaluation of legal and judicial reform projects. His most recent book, The Internet Challenge to Television, was published by Harvard University Press in 1999.
    In recent years, Professor Owen has turned to the economic analysis of Madisonian remedies for the adverse effects of lawful political corruption in the U.S. He published “’To Promote the General Welfare' - Addressing Political Corruption in America,” British Journal of Ameri-can Legal Studies, in 2016. He is now working on a book with the working title “Madison’s Missing Branch,” a draft is available at SSRN.

  • Stephen Palumbi

    Stephen Palumbi

    Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor of Marine Sciences, Professor of Oceans and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe're interested in ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions related to marine (and sometimes terrestrial) organisms and ecosystems. We use evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology techniques, and our fieldwork takes us all around the world. Currently, we're studying coral diversity, the adaptive potential of corals in response to climate change, the movement of organisms between marine reserves, genetic changes in abalone in response to environmental.