School of Medicine


Showing 151-200 of 330 Results

  • Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bhalla's two primary research interests are in the role of the kidney in diabetes and hypertension. We use molecular, biochemical, and transgenic approaches to study: (1) mechanisms diabetic kidney disease disease including the role of the endothelium to regulate inflammation and kidney injury; and (2) regulation of tubular transport of glucose, sodium, and potassium. These latter studies have treatment implications in diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension.

  • Rashmi Parekh Bhandari

    Rashmi Parekh Bhandari

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interventions, treatments, and outcomes in pediatric pain management

  • Sushma Bharadwaj, MD

    Sushma Bharadwaj, MD

    Instructor, Medicine - Blood & Marrow Transplantation

    BioDr. Bharadwaj is fellowship-trained in blood and marrow transplantation, cellular therapy, hematology, and oncology. She is an instructor in the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    Dr. Bharadwaj focuses her expertise on diagnosing and treating cancer in blood and bone marrow. For each patient, she develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. In her diverse experience as a physician and scientist, she has served as an internal medicine doctor, hospitalist, hematologist, oncologist, and blood and marrow transplantation specialist. Dr. Bharadwaj has a degree in clinical research and is currently conducting clinical trials in transplant and cellular therapy.

    She has participated in research studies of advances in therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, melanoma, and breast cancer. She has co-authored articles published in Leukemia and Lymphoma and elsewhere. Topics include advances in cell transplantation. She also co-wrote the chapter on genome-driven personalized cancer therapy in the book Precision Medicine in Oncology.

    Dr. Bharadwaj has made presentations at meetings of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and other associations.
    Subjects include racial, demographic, and socioeconomic disparities in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Dr. Bharadwaj is a member of the American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, American Society of Hematology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  • Ankur Bharija

    Ankur Bharija

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPersonal and Professional (Clinical, research, and teaching) interests include promoting health and wellbeing for the frail elders and the seriously ill -- through innovation in High-value healthcare delivery systems, Public health-education, Health Information-technology and Social entrepreneurship.

  • Mahendra Bhati

    Mahendra Bhati

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Bhati is an interventional psychiatrist with expertise in psychiatric diagnosis, psychopharmacology, and neuromodulation. He completed postdoctoral research studying language abnormalities and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) evoked potentials in schizophrenia. He was a principle investigator for the DSM-5 academic field trials, and his research experiences included roles as an investigator in the first controlled clinical trials of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and low field synchronized TMS for treatment of depression. His current interests include studying TMS-evoked potentials as biomarkers for neuropsychiatric disorders, augmented-reality TMS, closed-loop responsive neurostimulation (RNS) for treatment of impulse and fear-related disorders, and magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound (FUS) for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder and depression.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations.

  • Nidhi Bhutani

    Nidhi Bhutani

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of our research is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that govern and reprogram cellular fate during development, regeneration and disease.

  • Vinod (Vinny) K. Bhutani

    Vinod (Vinny) K. Bhutani

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology; newborn jaundice, bilirubin biology and kernicterus prevention; pulmonary physiology, pulmonary functions and neonatal ventilation. To promote newborn screening for G6PD deficiency in USA.

  • Y. Katherine Bianco

    Y. Katherine Bianco

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Maternal Fetal Medicine

    BioMy clinical interest in pregnancies complicated with birth defects has led my underlying research interests in genomic abnormalities in the human trophoblast carrying to faulty placentation. The latter began with initial work during K12 and KO8 funding. I took a great interest in the human placenta as it carries potential advantages over other tissues sources: first, this highly metabolically active organ is the potential source of many transcripts. Second, the placenta forms at a very early stage of embryonic development, potentially allowing detection of primary alterations as compared to secondary changes that may mask the underlying causal phenomena. Finally, studying early placentation may provide targets for development of novel molecular approaches, such as up-regulate or down-regulate genes, the protein products of which could potentially serve as molecular surrogates for diagnosis and treatment of pregnancy complication such as miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy induced hypertension and intrauterine growth retardation. This work has led to the first Trisomy 21, Trisomy 18, trisomy 13 cell lines established from human placentas making it possible to apply gene editing in the early stages of human trophoblast development.

    As my primary clinical responsibility involves treating patients needing medical care and support through their high risk pregnancies, I am interested in factors that may impact outcomes, such as prenatal screening and diagnosis, maternal heart conditions, labor and delivery management, and safety approaches for the second stage of labor. In investigating length of labor and approaches to shorten the second stage, I have found methods of improving perinatal outcomes in diverse maternal populations.

    With regards to my interest in fetal medicine, I have worked in collaboration with other specialists such as radiologists and pediatric cardiologists utilizing imagining studies to assess and determine successful perinatal care and fetal survival.

  • David Bingham

    David Bingham

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioDavid Bingham MD is a clinical assistant pathologist specializing in gastrointestinal pathology. He is from Connecticut, graduated from Yale with a BA, and went to Columbia P&S for medical school. He did a residency in Pathology at Stanford University, graduated in 1992 and has been here ever since as a faculty member.

  • Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Binkley is a radiation oncologist specializing in lymphoma treatment and an assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology.

    His clinical expertise includes stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), total lymphoid and total body irradiation, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).

    For each patient, Dr. Binkley develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. His goals are to improve both health and quality of life.

    Dr. Binkley has conducted extensive research to advance cancer treatment. In his post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford, he studied the use of genomic signatures to predict response to radiotherapy. His current clinical and laboratory research seek to identify prognostic and predictive clinical, radiographic, and genomic factors to inform individualized treatment strategies.

    He has co-authored articles on his research discoveries published in Cancer Discovery, Blood, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, and elsewhere. Topics have included innovations in the treatment of lymphoma and lung cancer.

    He also has made invited presentations to colleagues at national and international conferences. He has presented the latest findings on radiation therapy for lung cancer and lymphoma at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma (ICML).

    Honors for Dr. Binkley include the Malcolm A. Bagshaw Award for leadership and outstanding scientific achievement. This award is named for a pioneer in radiation therapy and former chair of the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Binkley is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and American Association for Cancer Research. He is a founding member of the Global nLPHL One Working (GLOW) Working Group, an international collaboration studying nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) in children and adults.

  • Julius Bishop, MD

    Julius Bishop, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bishop specializes in treating fractures of the upper extremity, lower extremity, pelvis and acetabulum as well as the management of post-traumatic problems including malunion, nonunion and infection.

    He received his undergraduate and medical school degrees from Harvard University and went on to complete the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program. He pursued his subspecialty training in Orthopaedic Traumatology at the world-renowned Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington.

    His research interests include applying decision analysis models to orthopaedic trauma problems, studying clinical outcomes after musculoskeletal injury, orthopaedic biomechanics, the basic science of fracture healing, and evaluating new strategies and techniques in fracture surgery.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging)
    On Partial Leave from 08/25/2021 To 05/31/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Brian Blackburn

    Brian Blackburn

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include parasitology and global health; I've investigated cryptosporidium and angiostrongylus outbreaks; schistosoma/strongyloides seroprevalence in refugees, and the distribution and impact of ITNs for malaria and filariasis prevention in Nigeria and India. I have done clinical and programmatic work at teaching hospitals in Liberia and Bangladesh and have opportunities for research in Bangladesh and Kenya, in collaboration with ICDDR,B and CDC, Kenya

  • Richard Bland

    Richard Bland

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of acute and chronic neonatal lung injury and the mechanisms that regulate lung fluid balance and alveolar & pulmonary vascular development after premature birth.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Rebecca Blankenburg, MD, MPH

    Rebecca Blankenburg, MD, MPH

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy educational research interests focus on building a more diverse, inclusive and equitable learning environment and helping develop a sense of belonging, professional identity formation, and competence through longitudinal coaching and scholarly mentorship.

  • Terrence Blaschke

    Terrence Blaschke

    Professor of Medicine and of Molecular Pharmacology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms of variability in drug response.

    Drug development

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor, Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    On Partial Leave from 01/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Douglas W. Blayney

    Douglas W. Blayney

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving the quality of cancer care at Stanford, in our network of care, and nationally

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Catherine Blish

    Catherine Blish

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major goal of our research is to gain insight into the prevention and control of HIV and other viral pathogens by studying the interplay between the virus and the host immune response. We investigate the role of various arms of the immune response, but with a particular focus on NK cells. We hope to gain additional insights into control of infectious diseases by studying how pregnancy modulates immune responses.

  • Daniel Bloch

    Daniel Bloch

    Professor (Research) of Biomedical Data Science (BDS), Emeritus

    BioI received my PhD. in Mathematical Statistics in 1967. I joined the research community at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, in 1984 as head statistician directing the biostatistics consulting and analytic support of the Arthritis Rheumatism Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) and Multipurpose Arthritis Center (MAC) grant-related research programs. In 1993 I was appointed Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, and am currently Professor of Biostatistics at Stanford University, emeritus since 2007. My contributions to the statistics literature span numerous fields, including methods of sample size estimation, efficiency and bias of estimators, research methods for kappa statistics, non-parametric classification methods and methods of assessing multi-parameter endpoints. I have over 200 peer-reviewed publications. I have been directly involved with the development of numerous criteria rules for classification of diseases and with establishing guidelines for clinical trial research and in proposing responder criteria for osteoarthritis drugs. Since 1987, I have been a consultant on an ad hoc basis to pharmaceutical and biotechnical firms, including both start-up and established companies. I have extensive experience with devices, drugs and biologics and have participated in all aspects of applying statistics to implement investigational plans; e.g.: for protocol development, design of trials, database design. I’ve been a member of the FDA Statistical Advisors Panel, the statistical member on numerous data safety monitoring boards, and frequently represent companies at meetings with the FDA

  • Andra Leah Blomkalns

    Andra Leah Blomkalns

    Redlich Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Andra Blomkalns is an innovation advocate who believes the best patient-centered programs depend upon clinical practice innovation, continuous data-driven improvement, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Dr. Blomkalns has a long-standing history of scholarship and publication on cardiovascular emergencies, point-of-care testing, innate immunity, and obesity. She has authored or contributed to more than 14 chapters and more than 40 journal articles in peer-reviewed publications on topics influential to administration and organization, clinical best practices, and scientific exploration. Additionally, her grant portfolio diversity reflects her multi-pronged, collaborative approach, and includes institutional, investigator-initiated industry, and federal funding.

  • Gordon Bloom

    Gordon Bloom

    Lecturer, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioGordon founded the Social Entrepreneurship Collaboratory (SE Labs) at Stanford, Harvard and Princeton. He teaches about the design, development and leadership of innovative social ventures in global health and environmental sustainability.

    At Stanford, Gordon is director of the Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab)- Human & Planetary Health and is a faculty fellow of the Center for Innovation in Global Health. He is a Lecturer in the School of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health/Dept. of Medicine, an affiliate at Stanford Health Policy/Center for Health Policy, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a mentor in the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program.

    At Harvard, Gordon taught jointly on the faculties of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health (Health Policy & Management) and the Harvard Kennedy School (Management, Leadership & Decision Sciences) and served as an Expert-in-Residence (EiR) at the Harvard Innovation Lab (i-Lab), and affiliated faculty at the Center for Primary Care, Harvard Medical School (HMS). He was faculty director of the Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) for US & Global Health, an incubator course taught in a new interdisciplinary, collaborative model based at the i-Lab. He has also served as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence (2013-2014) at Harvard Business School in the Rock Center for Entrepreneurship, on the Faculty of Arts & Sciences in the Sociology Department, at the Harvard Kennedy School, on the Leadership & Management faculty, and as a principal of the Hauser Center for Non-Profit Organizations (2004-2007). Gordon served as one of the founding faculty of the $10 million Reynolds Fellows Program in Social Entrepreneurship, a Center for Public Leadership and Harvard President’s interdisciplinary fellowship initiative that paid full tuition and stipend for graduate students from the Harvard Kennedy School, School of Public Health and Graduate School of Education.

    At Princeton, Gordon served as Dean’s Visiting Professor in Entrepreneurship in 2009-2010. Working together with the School of Engineering & Applied Science, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, and the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, he launched a new set of programs and prizes in social innovation and entrepreneurship in collaboration with students, faculty and alumni.

    At Stanford in 2001-2002, Gordon created the SE Lab, a Silicon Valley and technology–influenced, interdisciplinary incubator for social ventures and global problem solving. Gordon taught on the Public Policy Program and Urban Studies Program faculties (School of Humanities & Sciences) and served as a faculty affiliate at the Center for Social Innovation at Stanford Graduate School of Business, and a Program Officer at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

    Many of the talented students and fellows in Gordon’s SE Labs have won the top awards of prestigious idea and business plan competitions, including those at Stanford, Harvard, Princeton and MIT.

    Gordon is an author in the edited volume Frontiers in Social Innovation (N. Malhotra, ed., Harvard Business Review Press, 2021) and Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social Change (A. Nicholls, ed., Oxford University Press, 2006/2008) and served as a founding member of the Oxford/Ashoka led University Network for Social Entrepreneurship. His interest in entrepreneurship is informed by work in both the private and nonprofit sectors in the U.S. (New York, Cambridge, Palo Alto), Europe (London, Paris) and Asia (Hong Kong), as CEO of a medical technology company (EDAP Technomed, USA) and in international strategy consulting (Bain & Co. Ltd.).

    Gordon is married to Sara Singer- they on occasion teach together at Stanford, have a daughter Audrey (22) and son Jason (19), and live in the Frenchman's Hill residential section of campus.