School of Medicine


Showing 1-37 of 37 Results

  • Michele Calos

    Michele Calos

    Professor of Genetics, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is developing innovative gene and stem cell therapies for genetic diseases, with a focus on gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    We have created novel methods for inserting therapeutic genes into the chromosomes at specific places by using homologous recombination and recombinase enzymes.

    We are working on 3 forms of muscular dystrophy.

    We created induced pluripotent stem cells from patient fibroblasts, added therapeutic genes, differentiated, and engrafted the cells.

  • Venita Chandra

    Venita Chandra

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Chandra is a board certified vascular surgeon who specializes in cutting edge approaches to aortic aneurysmal disease, peripheral vascular disease and limb salvage.

  • Stephen Chang, MD, PhD

    Stephen Chang, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Biochemistry
    Instructor, Biochemistry
    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioPrior to a career in medicine, Dr. Chang was an English major and subsequent novelist at night. During the days, he taught literature part-time at Rutgers University, and for extra money, worked in a laboratory in NYC washing test tubes. Inspired by his laboratory mentor, he began volunteering at the hospital next door, and developed a love for interacting with patients. Through this experience, he saw how caring for others could form deep bonds between people - even strangers - and connect us in a way that brings grandeur to ordinary life.

    In addition to seeing patients, Dr. Chang is a physician-scientist devoted to advancing the field of cardiovascular medicine. His research has been focused on identifying a new genetic organism that better models human heart disease than the mouse. For this purpose, he has been studying the mouse lemur, the smallest non-human primate, performing cardiovascular phenotyping (vital signs, ECG, echocardiogram) on lemurs both in-bred (in France) and in the wild (in Madagascar) to try to identify mutant cardiac traits that may be heritable - and in the process, characterize the first high-throughput primate model of human cardiac disease.

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Tara I. Chang

    Tara I. Chang

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on issues such as blood pressure control, coronary revascularization, and the comparative effectiveness of cardioprotective medications in patients with chronic kidney disease, with the long-term goal of improving cardiovascular outcomes in these high-risk patients.

  • Akshay Chaudhari

    Akshay Chaudhari

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chaudhari is interested in the application of artificial intelligence techniques to all aspects of medical imaging, including automated schedule and reading prioritization, image reconstruction, quantitative analysis, and prediction of patient outcomes. His interests range from developing novel data-efficient machine learning algorithms to clinical deployment and validation of patient outcomes. He is also exploring combining imaging with clinical, natural language, and time series data.

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the physics of cell migration, division, and morphogenesis in 3D, as well cell-matrix mechanotransduction, or the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices. For both these areas, we use engineered biomaterials for 3D culture as artificial extracellular matrices.

  • (Robert) Jeenchen Chen

    (Robert) Jeenchen Chen

    Clinical Instructor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy expertise is to interpret clinical data by biostatistics. My pending research are below:
    AI Prediction Model of Profound Cardiogenic Shock status post VA-ECMO
    Surgical outcomes of pericardiectomy for constrictive pericarditis by national and hospital databases
    The effect of hybrid operation on the outcomes of acute type-A aortic dissection by hospital data
    Calcium Physiology of Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle — the First Evidence from Human Transplant Cardiectomy (Presented at ISHLT 2017)

  • Christopher Cheng

    Christopher Cheng

    Adjunct Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research laboratory focuses on understanding the mechanics of the cardiovascular system, especially with respect to interactions between medical devices and the dynamic cardiovascular environment. We use medical imaging, 3D geometric modeling, and custom deformation quantification techniques to investigate disease processes and medical device performance. We are interested in the dynamics of the heart, aorta, and peripheral vasculature, and are always seeking ways to apply our research to current and emerging therapies. While our research pursuits seek to add to the fundamental understanding of cardiovascular biomechanics, all of our projects are directly related to improving medical device design, evaluation, regulation, and their use in clinical practice.

  • Paul Cheng MD PhD

    Paul Cheng MD PhD

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Cheng is a Cardiologist and Instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Cheng received his BEng in Chemical Engineering and BSc in biology at MIT. He subsequently completed his MD/PhD at UCSF working in the Srivastava lab studying how extracellular morphogenic signals affect cardiac development and fate determination of cardiac progenitors. After finishing an internal medicine residency at Stanford, Paul has continued at Stanford as a fellow in cardiology. He is currently investigating molecular mechanisms behind genetic risk factors for human cardiovascular disease with a keen interest in amyloidosis, cardio-oncology, and atherosclerotic diseases. His current research focuses on the transcriptional regulation in smooth muscle cells utilizing both in vitro and in vivo models in combination with single-cell technologies to gain further insights into mechanisms that underlies genetic contributions to risk of human vascular and atherosclerotic diseases.

  • Xingxing Shelley Cheng

    Xingxing Shelley Cheng

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Nephrology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Xingxing Cheng's expertise is in applying the tools of decision science to clinical practice and policy analysis. Her current research is in the following areas:
    1) the costs, effectiveness, and implementation of work-up before kidney transplantation, including pretransplant cardiovascular screening;
    2) ethics of and decision-making in in multi-organ transplantation.

  • Glenn M. Chertow

    Glenn M. Chertow

    Norman S. Coplon/Satellite Healthcare Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsclinical epidemiology, health services research, decision sciences, clinical trials in acute and chronic kidney disease

  • Christina F. Chick

    Christina F. Chick

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines the mechanistic contributions of sleep, cognition and affect to the onset and course of psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. I am particularly interested in adolescence as a period during which changes in circadian rhythm, sleep architecture, and sleep behavior co-occur with neuroendocrine development, psychosocial changes, and the onset of many psychiatric disorders. Given that sleep is a highly treatable target, increasing our understanding of the specific contributions of sleep to psychiatric symptom onset may facilitate the development of targeted interventions to mitigate the course of illness.

  • Wah Chiu

    Wah Chiu

    Wallenberg-Bienenstock Professor and Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research includes methodology improvements in single particle cryo-EM for atomic resolution structure determination of molecules and molecular machines, as well as in cryo-ET of cells and organelles towards subnanometer resolutions. We collaborate with many researchers around the country and outside the USA on understanding biological processes such as protein folding, virus assembly and disassembly, pathogen-host interactions, signal transduction, and transport across cytosol and membranes.

  • Valerie Chock

    Valerie Chock

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurological monitoring in critically ill infants. Altered hemodynamics in neonates, especially in relation to prematurity, congenital heart disease, and central nervous system injury. Determination of the hemodynamic significance and effects of a patent ductus arteriosus in the preterm infant. Utilizing NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) and other technologies for improved monitoring in the NICU.

  • Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Daniel Eugene Clark

    Daniel Eugene Clark

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Clark completed a 4-year MD/MPH program at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. He subsequently completed all of his post-graduate training at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), including Internal Medicine-Pediatrics, Adult Cardiology, and Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD). Additionally, he served as Chief Fellow of the Vanderbilt Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship, trained in multimodality cardiovascular imaging, and conducted clinical research during a two-year NIH-funded T32 research fellowship at VUMC.

    Prior to joining the Stanford ACHD faculty, he was appointed Instructor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Vanderbilt and read cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging as an attending for two years. He is appointed Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His academic and investigative interests focus on advanced cardiovascular imaging for ACHD patients, particularly the application of CMR in this population. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Clark pivoted his scholarly efforts to focus on studying the cardiovascular effects of COVID-19 with CMR. His current clinical investigations include understanding the CMR-derived diastolic patterns of Fontan physiology and the effect of cardiac rehabilitation on functional status among patients with Fontan failure.

  • Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Clarke is a preventive cardiologist and an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics. He earned his undergraduate degree in human biology from the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University before obtaining his MD and PhD (genetics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He has completed clinical training in internal medicine (Brigham & Women’s Hospital), pediatrics (Boston Children’s Hospital), and cardiovascular medicine (Stanford Hospital), and he is board certified in all three specialties. His research is focused on 1) understanding complex disease genetics in diverse populations, 2) integrating monogenic and polygenic risk with clinical risk, 3) large-scale phenotyping using the electronic health record. His clinical practice focuses on identifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease with the goal of promoting health and longevity through evidence-based personalized treatment. He is interested in developing family-centric approaches for the treatment of adults and children carrying high genetic risk for disease.

  • William Clusin, MD

    William Clusin, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac action potentials; tissue culture, voltage, clamp technique; role of calcium in ischemia arrhythmias; coronary, artery disease; myocardial infarction.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research, Addie and Al Macovski Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Carol Conrad

    Carol Conrad

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in studying the effects of inflammation in the lung, in particular, how N-acetylcysteine may affect and decrease that in CF patients. I am the PI of a multi-center study researching this question. Additionally, in a separate study involving children who have received lung transplants, I am a participating site in an NIH-sponsored observational and mechanistic multi-center study that will examine the role of viral infections in causing chronic graft rejection.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Markus Covert

    Markus Covert

    Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is on building computational models of complex biological processes, and using them to guide an experimental program. Such an approach leads to a relatively rapid identification and validation of previously unknown components and interactions. Biological systems of interest include metabolic, regulatory and signaling networks as well as cell-cell interactions. Current research involves the dynamic behavior of NF-kappaB, an important family of transcription factors.

  • Gerald Crabtree

    Gerald Crabtree

    David Korn, MD, Professor of Pathology and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChromatin regulation and its roles in human cancer and the development of the nervous system. Engineering new methods for studying and controlling chromatin and epigenetic regulation in living cells.

  • Bianxiao Cui

    Bianxiao Cui

    Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur objective is to develop new biophysical methods to advance current understandings of cellular machinery in the complicated environment of living cells. Currently, we are focusing on four research areas: (1) Membrane curvature at the nano-bio interface; (2) Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) for scalable intracellular electrophysiology; (3) Electrochromic optical recording (ECORE) for neuroscience; and (4) Optical control of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases.

  • Maria Elizabeth Currie, MD, PhD

    Maria Elizabeth Currie, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Currie is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiothoracic surgeon. She is also a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. With subspecialty training in heart failure, Dr. Currie treats all forms of cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and valvular heart disease. She performs heart transplant, lung transplant, and combined heart-lung transplant procedures as part of a multidisciplinary team. She excels at valve surgery and the implantation of mechanical circulatory support systems.

    Dr. Currie welcomes referrals from cardiologists and primary care physicians as early as possible when cardiovascular disease is suspected. Understanding that early intervention can prevent later complications, she invites communication about screening, diagnostics, and treatment strategies.

    For each patient, Dr. Currie’s goal is to achieve the best possible outcome using the most advanced minimally invasive cardiac care techniques and technology available. Combined with technical expertise and a focus on excellent clinical outcomes, Dr. Currie delivers empathetic, thoughtful patient care. She ensures that patients are well informed about what they can expect both before and after their surgical procedure.

    Dr. Currie is passionate about improving the safety of cardiac surgery. Her research includes translational studies on new ways to visualize anatomic structures that are difficult to see during minimally invasive surgery. One published study investigated the use of augmented reality (AR) guided by transesophageal echocardiography in minimally invasive mitral valve repair. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, The International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery, Transplant Immunology, and other peer reviewed publications.

    Dr. Currie’s interest in technological advances is rooted in her commitment to the evolution of technology and technique in the fast-changing, relatively young field of cardiac surgery. Also driving her interest is her PhD background in biomedical engineering. She has made presentations on the use of AR systems, 3D visualization technology, and robotics-assisted surgical procedures at the American Association for Thoracic Surgery Annual Meeting, International Society for Minimally Invasive Surgery Annual Scientific Meeting, and other conferences.

    Dr. Currie has won numerous awards for her research achievements and scholarship. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada. She is also a member of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, the International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery, Women in Thoracic Surgery, and the Association of Women Surgeons. With its long legacy of leadership in cardiac surgery and research, Dr. Currie feels Stanford Health Care enables her to pursue her research interests and offers her patients access to the latest innovations, along with expertise across specialties including engineering and statistics.

  • Martha S. Cyert

    Martha S. Cyert

    Dr. Nancy Chang Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Cyert lab is identifying signaling networks for calcineurin, the conserved Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, and target of immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A, in yeast and mammals. Cell biological investigations of target dephosphorylation reveal calcineurin’s many physiological functions. Roles for short linear peptide motifs, or SLiMs, in substrate recognition, network evolution, and regulation of calcineurin activity are being studied.