School of Medicine


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  • Asuka Eguchi

    Asuka Eguchi

    Instructor, Microbiology & Immunology - Baxter Laboratory

    BioAsuka Eguchi, PhD is an instructor working with Helen Blau, PhD at Stanford University. Her interests lie in understanding how cells sense and respond to genotoxic stress. Currently, she is developing therapeutic strategies to combat heart failure in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dr. Eguchi received her BS in Biology at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. As a graduate student, she developed an Artificial Transcription Factor library to interrogate transcriptional networks that control cell fate decisions under the mentorship of Aseem Ansari, PhD. During her postdoctoral research, she discovered that a telomere binding protein can rescue disease phenotypes of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. Dr. Eguchi is also developing gene therapies that address heart failure in Duchenne and Becker patients. She is a recipient of the Translational Research and Applied Medicine Award, the American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship, and Muscular Dystrophy Association Development Grant.

  • Irmina A. Elliott, MD

    Irmina A. Elliott, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Elliott is a thoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She provides the complete spectrum of surgical care for lung cancer, esophageal cancer, mediastinal tumors, and more through the Stanford Health Care Thoracic Cancer Program. She specializes in minimally invasive, including robotic, approaches to thoracic surgery.

    Dr. Elliott received fellowship training from Stanford University. She completed her residency at UCLA Medical Center.

    Her research has received support from the National Institutes of Health. She has investigated cancer cell response to replication stress, outcomes in patients undergoing hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy (HITHOC) for mesothelioma, complications after esophageal surgery, lymph node involvement in patients with carcinoid tumors of the lung, advanced techniques in robotic surgery, and other topics.

    She has authored articles that have appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Annals of Thoracic Surgery, JAMA Surgery, and other peer-reviewed publications. She also has contributed to textbooks including the content on social disparities in lung cancer for the book Social Disparities in Thoracic Surgery.

    Dr. Elliott has made presentations to her peers at meetings of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Society of Surgical Oncology, Western Thoracic Surgical Association, and other organizations. Presentations focused on surgical treatment of patients with carcinoid tumor of the lung, improvement of mesothelioma patient survival, complications of esophageal surgery, novel targets for cancer treatment, and more.

  • Jesse Engreitz

    Jesse Engreitz

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulatory elements in the human genome harbor thousands of genetic risk variants for common diseases and could reveal targets for therapeutics — if only we could map the complex regulatory wiring that connects 2 million regulatory elements with 21,000 genes in thousands of cell types in the human body.

    We combine experimental and computational genomics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics to assemble regulatory maps of the human genome and uncover biological mechanisms of disease.

  • Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs)

    BioDaniel Ennis {he/him} is a Professor in the Department of Radiology. As an MRI scientist for nearly twenty years, he has worked to develop advanced translational cardiovascular MRI methods for quantitatively assessing structure, function, flow, and remodeling in both adult and pediatric populations. He began his research career as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University during which time he formed an active collaboration with investigators in the Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI). Thereafter, he joined the Departments of Radiological Sciences and Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University as a postdoc and began to establish an independent research program with an NIH K99/R00 award focused on “Myocardial Structure, Function, and Remodeling in Mitral Regurgitation.” For ten years he led a group of clinicians and scientists at UCLA working to develop and evaluate advanced cardiovascular MRI exams as PI of several NIH funded studies. In 2018 he returned to the Department of Radiology at Stanford University as faculty in the Radiological Sciences Lab to bolster programs in cardiovascular MRI. He is also the Director of Radiology Research for the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System where he oversees a growing radiology research program.