School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 15 Results

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: general oncology, sarcomas. Research Interests: clinical trials in solid tumors.

  • Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe identified a common disorder of aging called clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). CHIP occurs due to certain somatic mutations in blood stem cells and represents a precursor state for blood cancer, but is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. We hope to understand more about the biology and clinical implications of CHIP using human and model system studies.

  • Ted Jardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Daniel Jarosz

    Daniel Jarosz

    Associate Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development. We focus on how molecular chaperones, proteins that help other biomolecules to fold, affect the phenotypic output of genetic variation. To do so we combine classical biochemistry and genetics with systems-level approaches. Ultimately we seek to understand how homeostatic mechanisms influence the acquisition of biological novelty and identify means of manipulating them for therapeutic and biosynthetic benefit.

  • Stefanie S. Jeffrey, MD

    Stefanie S. Jeffrey, MD

    John and Marva Warnock Professor, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Jeffrey led the multidisciplinary team from the Schools of Medicine, Engineering, and Genome Technology Center that invented the MagSweeper, an automated device that immunomagnetically captures live circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood for single cell analysis or culture. Her lab also works on microfluidic technologies for tumor cell capture, characterization, and growth - with the goal of defining individual patient response to newer biologically-based cancer therapies.

  • Michael Jeng

    Michael Jeng

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests focus on: 1) histiocytic disorders, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and 2) vascular anomalies and malformations.

  • Kristin Jensen

    Kristin Jensen

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical translational investigator with a primary interest in breast cancer biology, and the use of investigational and clinical ancillary techniques such as gene and tissue microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease. As a practicing cytopathologist, I also have an interest in improving the fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of breast lesions, again using immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis as adjuncts to cytomorphology.

  • Livnat Jerby

    Livnat Jerby

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    BioLivnat Jerby is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University. Her research focuses on multicellular circuits as a disease driver and therapeutic avenue, aiming to develop tissue remodeling and immunomodulating interventions for disease treatment and prevention. As a postdoctoral fellow in Aviv Regev's lab at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, she identified novel regulators of T cell exclusion and dysfunction. Her work identified new mechanisms controlling cellular and tissue immunogenicity and demonstrated the potential of epigenetic reprogramming as a therapeutic modality to overcome immunotherapy resistance in cancer. Dr. Jerby holds a B.Sc. in Computer Science and Biology and obtained her PhD in 2016 from Tel Aviv University, where she worked with Prof. Eytan Ruppin, studying non-linear genetic interactions. Bringing together latest advances in genetic engineering, single-cell genomics, imaging, and machine learning, her laboratory develops systems for studying cellular circuits at greater scale, resolution, and depth, and identify new ways to target and engineer endogenous and synthetic immune circuits.

    Dr. Jerby’s research has been generously supported by the Schmidt Family Foundation, Rothschild Foundation, the Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF), Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance (OCRA), Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Chan Zuckerberg Biohub initiative.