School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 43 Results

  • Neil M. Kalwani

    Neil M. Kalwani

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioNeil Kalwani, MD, MPP is a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Director of Preventive Cardiology at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. He attended college at Yale University and completed graduate degrees in medicine and public policy at Harvard University. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital before arriving at Stanford in 2018 for fellowship in cardiovascular medicine, during which he served as Chief Fellow. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship through the Stanford-AHRQ Health Services Research Training Program in the Department of Health Policy. His clinical focus is in general and preventive cardiology and echocardiography. He practices at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System and at Stanford Health Care.

    Dr. Kalwani's research focuses on the evaluation of policies and care delivery innovations designed to improve the value of care for patients with cardiovascular disease.

  • Guson Kang

    Guson Kang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Kang is an interventional cardiologist who specializes in the treatment of structural heart disease. He has expertise in complex coronary interventions, transcatheter aortic and mitral valve replacements, transcatheter mitral valve repair, left atrial appendage occlusion, PFO/septal defect closure, alcohol septal ablation, and paravalvular leak closure.

    A Bay Area native, he graduated from Stanford University and obtained his medical degree at Yale University. He came back to Stanford to train in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology before completing an advanced structural interventions fellowship at Ford Hospital.

  • Peter Kao

    Peter Kao

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program has several active projects:
    1.) Pulmonary Vascular Disease – Simvastatin reversed experimental pulmonary hypertension, and is safe for treatment of patients. Blinded clinical trials of efficacy are in progress.
    2.) Lung inflammation and regeneration (stem cells)
    3.) Lung surfactant rheology and oxidative stress
    4.) Gene regulation by RNA binding proteins, NF45 and NF90 through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Reinhard Family Professor, Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Ioannis Karakikes

    Ioannis Karakikes

    Associate Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Karakikes Lab aims to uncover fundamental new insights into the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of pathogenic mutations associated with familial cardiovascular diseases.

  • Karthikeshwar Kasirajan (Kasi)

    Karthikeshwar Kasirajan (Kasi)

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioDr. Kasirajan is a board-certified, fellowship-trained vascular surgeon. Also known as Dr. Kasi, he is a clinical professor of vascular surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kasirajan preserves limbs, facilitates access to dialysis, and helps his patients manage conditions such as aneurysms, varicose veins, thoracic outlet syndrome, and deep vein thrombosis. Many of his limb preservation patients smoke, have diabetes, or are experiencing renal failure. Dr. Kasirajan’s experience also centers around the treatment of aneurysms and prevention of strokes.

    In all cases, his goal is to provide either noninvasive or minimally invasive management whenever possible. He performs open surgery only when it is the best option. Dr. Kasirajan treats many patients with stents and stent grafts, which can shorten hospital stays and recovery times.

    Dr. Kasirajan (Kasi) receives referrals of patients from primary care physicians, nephrologists, podiatrists, cardiologists, woundcare specialists, diabetologists, neurologists, and other specialists. He welcomes referrals as early as possible, ideally before patients become symptomatic. A strong proponent of doing early screening for peripheral artery disease, Dr. Kasirajan advocates for the use of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in routine physical examinations. When providers detect an imbalance between leg and arm blood pressure, Dr. Kasirajan can help create customized strategies to address the cause before the problem worsens.

    In addition to offering excellent vascular care to the community, Dr. Kasirajan joined Stanford to continue pursuing his research interests. He has conducted research into advances in minimally invasive procedures for stroke prevention and for aneurysm management. His research has also focused on how to improve surgery outcomes to help patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease. Dr. Kasirajan has been the investigator in over 40 multicenter studies involving new stent graphs, thrombectomy catheters, and other advances in endovascular technology.

    Dr. Kasirajan has made more than 100 presentations worldwide on minimally invasive vascular surgery techniques and preventive care in the vascular patient. He has spoken at multiple conferences including the Society for Vascular Surgery, Peripheral Vascular Society, and the South Asian American Vascular Society. He has earned numerous honors for his academic achievements, including the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha award for medical student and resident education.

    As the author of more than 120 journal articles, Dr. Kasirajan’s work has appeared in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, Endovascular Today, Pharmacogenomics Journal, Catheter Cardiovascular Intervention, and many other publications. He also has authored 20 book chapters in textbooks including Medical Management of the Surgical Patient 5th Edition, Advances in Phlebology and Venus Surgery Volume 1, Current Therapy in Vascular Surgery, Mastery of Surgery, and many more.

    Dr. Kasirajan has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Endovascular Therapy, Annals of Vascular Surgery, International Journal of Angiology, and other publications.

  • Daniel Katz

    Daniel Katz

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDaniel Katz is an Instructor of Medicine and an Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiologist. He completed internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, general cardiology training at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and then joined Stanford in 2021 for his advanced heart failure training. Since medical school, his research has focused on identifying the various pathophysiologic patterns and mechanisms that lead to the heterogeneous syndrome of heart failure. His efforts leverage high dimensional data in many forms including clinical phenotypes, plasma proteomics, metabolomics, and genetics. He is presently engaged in analysis of multi-omic data from the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC) and the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program. His clinical interests include advanced heart failure, transplant cardiology, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Kawana joined the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed a postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in the Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in the clinic and attends CCU/heart failure service, and post-heart transplant and MCS service. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approaches, which would lead to the development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein. He is involved in multiple clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in inherited cardiomyopathy and also conducting a device study in heart failure.

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor of Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Abha Khandelwal

    Abha Khandelwal

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular disease in Pregnancy
    Valvular Heart Disease
    Cardiomyopathy
    Pericardial disease
    Heart Disease in South Asians
    Women's Cardiovascular Disease

  • Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioButrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received the BS degree from the American University of Beirut, the MS degree from Dartmouth College, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. His current research interests include medical ultrasound imaging and therapy, ultrasound neuro-stimulation, chemical/biological sensors, gas flow and energy flow sensing, micromachined ultrasonic transducers, and ultrasonic fluid ejectors. He has authored over 600 publications and has been principal inventor or co-inventor of 107 US and international issued patents. He was awarded the Medal of the City of Bordeaux in 1983 for his contributions to Nondestructive Evaluation, the Distinguished Advisor Award of the School of Engineering at Stanford University in 1987, the Distinguished Lecturer Award of the IEEE UFFC society in 1999, a Stanford University Outstanding Inventor Award in 2004, Distinguished Alumnus Award of the School of Engineering of the American University of Beirut in 2005, Stanford Biodesign Certificate of Appreciation for commitment to educate, mentor and inspire Biodesgin Fellows, 2011, and 2011 recipient of IEEE Rayleigh award.

  • Kiran Kaur Khush, MD

    Kiran Kaur Khush, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Khush'’s clinical research interests include the evaluation of donors and recipients for heart transplantation; mechanisms of adverse outcomes after heart transplantation, including cardiac allograft vasculopathy and antibody-mediated rejection; and development of non-invasive diagnostic approaches for post-transplant monitoring.

  • Joel Killen

    Joel Killen

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (General Internal Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the development and evaluation of cigarette smoking prevention and cessation therapies and obesity prevention treatments for children, adolescents and adults.

  • Dan Seung Kim, MD, PhD, MPH

    Dan Seung Kim, MD, PhD, MPH

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Fellow in Medicine
    Resident in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research projects within the laboratory of Euan Ashley center around the broad topic of exercise, physiology, and cardiovascular disease:
    1. Digital health interventions - I previously have published on the topic of digital health interventions delivered via an iPhone app (Kim and Javed et al, European Heart Journal - Digital Health 2023). We found that personalizing interventions based on individual's baseline activity was more effective in increasing short-term physical activity than other "one-size fits all" approaches. In our next phase, we will extend this to under-represented populations in digital health and implement cutting-edge artificial intelligence models to improve our interventions.
    2. Molecular mechanisms of exercise physiologic adaptations - using time-series multi-omic data, we aim to map out the molecular responses to endurance exercise training in rats, using data from the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC). See our recent review in Nature Reviews Genetics - Kim et al, 2021.
    3. Effect of physical activity on coronary artery disease symptoms and outcomes - in collaboration with Dr David Maron and the ISCHEMIA study, I am investigating the effects of physical activity and sedentary behavior on symptoms related to known coronary heart disease and separately, the outcome of all-cause mortality.
    4. Exercise [hysiology - in collaboration with Dr Francois Haddad and Dr Jonathan Myers, I am working on projects to better standardize reporting of maximal oxygen uptake. In brief, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) is an extremely valuable prognostic, but estimation of this physiologic value is poor in certain populations. We are working to improve estimation of this variable and demonstrating its efficacy in predicting hard outcomes in patients with heart failure.
    5. Outcomes in inherited cardiomyopathies - under the mentorship of Dr Euan Ashley, I am building my clinical expertise in treating patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. The Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease (SCICD) is home to clinical care of patients with inherited cardiomyopathies, channelopathies, inherited lipid disorders, neuromuscular disorders (e.g., muscular dystrophy), and vascular disorders (e.g., Marfan's and other aorthopathies). Our clinic is nested within the Heart Failure program and manages those patients who are progressing toward advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant or left ventricular assist devices. Within this clinic, I am leading projects to describe our experience with mavacamten, a first of its class treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with obstruction.