School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 15 Results

  • Scott R. Lambert, MD

    Scott R. Lambert, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research has focused on improving the visual outcomes of children with congenital cataracts. I organized a randomized clinical trial, the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study to compare the visual outcomes of infants optically corrected with a contact lens vs. an intraocular lens after unilateral cataract surgery. A second area of research has been ocular growth after cataract surgery.

  • Wen-Shin Lee, MD

    Wen-Shin Lee, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology

    BioDr. Wen-Shin Lee, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Clinic Chief and Medical Director of the Byers Eye Institute Tri-Valley.

    Dr. Lee is a fellowship trained, board certified ophthalmologist with expertise in the medical and surgical management of glaucoma, cataracts, and anterior segment disease. Working with patients to provide individually tailored treatment plans, he incorporates the full spectrum of conventional and minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. He also performs complex and refractive cataract surgery utilizing advanced technology intraocular lenses. His goal is to provide the highest level of care to each patient with evidence-based medicine and cutting-edge technology.

    In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Lee is actively involved in clinical research and education at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is a principal investigator and co-investigator on multiple clinical trials and research studies with a focus on glaucoma. He is the resident glaucoma rotation director for the Stanford ophthalmology residency and co-director of the Bay Area Ophthalmology Course. He has developed and leads microsurgical training programs for medical students, residents, and fellows at Stanford. In addition, he serves on the Education Committee and Clinical Competency Committee for the Stanford Department of Ophthalmology.

    Dr. Lee was educated at the University of California, Berkeley, where he graduated summa cum laude with a degree in molecular and cell biology. He then received his medical degree at Harvard Medical School, followed by his ophthalmology residency at the Stanford University School of Medicine, and glaucoma fellowship at the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA. Upon completion of his training he joined the clinical faculty at Stanford.

    Dr. Lee serves as the Clinic Chief and Medical Director of the Byers Eye Institute Tri-Valley, where his goal is to deliver world class eye care to the Tri-Valley region and beyond.

  • Theodore Leng, MD, FACS

    Theodore Leng, MD, FACS

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Leng was the first surgeon in California to perform a subretinal transplant of adult neural stem cells into patients with macular degeneration and is actively researching cellular, biologic and laser-based therapies for macular degeneration. He also has an active program in imaging informatics and deep learning to perform big data analyses of retinal scans to identify patients who are at risk for retinal disease deterioration. The end goal is earlier detection and rapid treatment to maximize visual outcomes.

    Dr. Leng is considered a leading expert on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT-based angiography (OCTA), a non-invasive and non-contact imaging technique for the retina. He is also considered a key opinion leader in artificial intelligence and data science.

  • Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIschemic optic neuropathy
    Stem cell transplantation
    Optic neuropathy
    Optic neuritis
    Eye movement disorders
    Reading
    Parkinson's disease
    Multiple sclerosis