School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 29 Results

  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor of Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Nilima Ragavan

    Nilima Ragavan

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioDr Nilima Ragavan is an experienced clinician who has expertise in the care of newborns ranging from critically ill to well babies. She is passionate about education and is the director of the Stanford pediatric resident rotation in the neonatal intensive care unit. She has led several multi disciplinary teams to India, and has organized and conducted international neonatal and perinatal conferences. She is a member of the palliative care team and serves as a mentor to junior faculty. She is the medical director of the Packard Special Care nursery at Sequoia, and also attends in the NICU at Stanford.

  • Sneha Ramakrishna

    Sneha Ramakrishna

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioSneha Ramakrishna obtained her B. A. from the University of Chicago and her M.D. from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. In medical school, through the Howard Hughes Medical Research Scholar Award, she joined Dr. Crystal Mackall’s laboratory, where she designed and developed various GD2 CAR-Ts and tested them in preclinical models. During her residency training in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, she cared for some of the first patients treated with CD19 CAR T cells, learning the power of this therapy first-hand. During her fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Johns Hopkins/National Cancer Institute combined program, she worked with Dr. Terry Fry. She evaluated the mechanism of CD22 CAR T cell relapse in patients by developing an antigen escape model and establishing a deeper understanding of the effects of antigen density on CAR-T phenotype, expansion, and persistence (Fry…Ramakrishna…Mackall Nat Med, 2018; Ramakrishna, et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019). Since arriving at Stanford, Dr. Ramakrishna leads an interdisciplinary team that designs, develops, and successfully implements a robust correlative science platform for our novel CAR-T therapies. Analyzing patient samples from our first-in-human GD2 CAR-T trial (NCT04196413) treating a universally fatal cancer, diffuse midline glioma (DMG), we identified that intracerebroventricular CAR-T administration correlates with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced immunosuppressive cell populations in cerebrospinal fluid as compared to intravenous CAR-T administration (Majzner*, Ramakrishna*, et al., Nature 2022 *co-first authors). Her research program evaluates unique sets of patient samples using novel single-cell immune profiling to identify the drivers of CAR-T success or failure. Building on these findings, her team will assess approaches to enhance CAR-T efficacy and translate these findings to the clinic.

    Clinically, Dr. Ramakrishna cares for children with solid tumors and treats hematologic, solid, and brain tumor pediatric patients with CAR T cell therapies in the Cancer Cellular Therapies program.

  • Anoop Rao

    Anoop Rao

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWearable senors, unobtrusive vital sign monitoring, natural language processing/text mining

  • Lindsey Rasmussen

    Lindsey Rasmussen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests reside in the field of Neurocritical Care Medicine. My research focus has included inflammation following traumatic brain injury, outcome prediction after cardiac arrest, and neuro-monitoring in the pediatric intensive care setting. These interests are integrated clinically to focus on the merging of specialized neurologic monitoring and care with prognostic efforts in critically ill patients.

  • Caroline E. Rassbach

    Caroline E. Rassbach

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education including learner assessment, program development and mentoring and coaching in medicine.

  • Noga Ravid

    Noga Ravid

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChildren with medical complexity, medical education.

  • Sushma Reddy

    Sushma Reddy

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory's expertise in cardiovascular phenotyping has led to the development of mouse models of congenital heart disease that recapitulate abnormal loading conditions on the heart. We have used these models to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease with the long term goal of identifying noninvasive diagnostic tools to better assess right ventricular health and to develop right ventricle specific therapeutics.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Pediatrics

    BioI am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • William Rhine

    William Rhine

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity and brain injury, non-invasive biotechnologies to study cellular and organ metabolism.

  • Tawna L. Roberts, OD, PhD

    Tawna L. Roberts, OD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology (Pediatric) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research efforts are funded by grants from the National Eye Institute, Department of Defense, and various foundations to study vision development in infants and young children as well as binocular vision disorders in adolescents and adults with concussions. Our focus is to identify underlying mechanisms that will inform clinical treatment approaches and ultimately leading to the prevention of strabismus, amblyopia, and binocular vision disorders.

  • Terry Robinson

    Terry Robinson

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on detection of early and progressive Cystic fibrosis (CF) structural lung disease by utilizing chest CT imaging and CT post-processing methodology. Current research efforts involve utilization of low dose infant & children CT imaging protocols and quantitative airway and air trapping algorithms to evaluate early and progressive CF disease.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Eunice Rodriguez

    Eunice Rodriguez

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent program of teaching and research integrates: 1) health disparities and social epidemiology, within the broader area of public health, and 2) program evaluation, as a synthesis of theory and methods applied to the evaluation of health and social programs.