School of Medicine


Showing 41-54 of 54 Results

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Glenn Rosen

    Glenn Rosen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory examines apoptotic and cell signaling pathways in cancer and lung disease. We are studying signaling pathways that regulate oxidative stress responses and cancer cell growth. Part of these studies focus on analysis of non-canonical transcription regulatory functions of the TERC and Tert components of telomerase in lung disease and cancer.

  • Saul A Rosenberg

    Saul A Rosenberg

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas Research Interests: clinical trials, clinical-pathological-biological correlations

  • Elsie Gyang Ross

    Elsie Gyang Ross

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and of Medicine (BMIR)

    BioDr. Ross is a vascular surgeon and research scientist. She graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2011 and completed her vascular surgery 0+5 residency at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2018. During her residency, she completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in biomedical informatics. Her current research focuses on using machine learning and electronic health records for early disease identification, precision medicine, and evaluating opportunities to engage in patient education beyond the clinic.

  • Mohana Roy, MD

    Mohana Roy, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Roy is a medical oncologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology. She has expertise in Lung and Thoracic cancers, but with a broad clinical interest in hematology and oncology.

    Dr. Roy became an oncologist because of her passion for patient care. She is committed to being a clinician and is focused on improving the patient experience -- from the moment a patient checks in, to how information about their care is conveyed, and how the complex process of getting cancer care can be made a bit more seamless.

    Her research interests include access to clinical trials, quality improvement and improving care delivery. In that effort, she has published on work regarding patient reported outcomes (PROs) and their use to help clinical quality efforts- including in the context of a clinical trial with an electronic PRO portal, through distress screening with the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center, and in improving access to such screening and care for patient with limited English proficiency. She is the recipient of both a clinical innovation award through Stanford and an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Merit award.

    She is the Associate Medical Director for Quality at Stanford Cancer Center from 2022.

    Dr. Roy received her medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and then completed residency training at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She then completed fellowship training in Hematology and Oncology at Stanford. She was chief fellow for her graduating year during fellowship as well.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Peter Rudd, MD

    Peter Rudd, MD

    Professor of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsQuality improvement efforts seek to make medical care the “best it can be” rather than merely “good enough” to avoid censure. Focus on improving the average performance usually produces more net benefit than eliminating outliers, often by simplification, standardization, and specification. We have worked with electronic medication monitors, clinical databases, and computerized order entry systems for better clinical outcomes and trained clinicians for professionalism and accountability.

  • Stephen Ruoss

    Stephen Ruoss

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have an active collaborative project examining basic and clinical aspects of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung infection in non-immune compromised adults. Studies have examined possible cellular immune mechanisms for increased susceptibility to these infections, and are also investigating aspects of optimal diagnosis and treatment. In addition, a clinical and translational research program is investigating the causes and genetic factors underlying the evolution of bronchiectasis.

  • Arjun Rustagi, MD, PhD

    Arjun Rustagi, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Arjun Rustagi is an Instructor in Medicine. He is a graduate of the University of Washington Medical Scientist Training Program and Stanford's Internal Medicine Residency and Infectious Diseases Fellowship.
    He is dedicated to understanding the early immune responses to infections, and the methods pathogens use to persist despite these responses, in order to inform new prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, he studies viral pathogenesis and immunity with Dr. Catherine Blish, whose mentorship and support allowed him to build the respiratory viral biosafety level 3 (BSL3) program at Stanford in early 2020 in order to study SARS-CoV-2. His ongoing interest is in the full spectrum of in vitro respiratory viral models, particularly those that recapitulate lung epithelium and mucosal immunity.

  • Tracy Rydel

    Tracy Rydel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioTracy Rydel is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine where she holds the positions of Assistant Dean for Clerkship Education and Director, Core Clerkship in Family and Community Medicine. She has also served as the Director of Medical Student Education in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health, and was an Educator-4-CARE faculty from 2017-2020. She is a family physician with a passion for medical education. She completed the Rathmann Family Foundation Fellowship in Patient-centered Care and Medical Education in 2012, is part of the Peer Coaching Program under the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy, and was the Director of the Practice of Medicine Year One Course at Stanford from 2013-2016. She emphasizes patient-centered care in the pursuit of clinical and educational excellence. She is frequently an invited presenter at the national conferences of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM), and the Western Group on Educational Affairs (WGEA) regional group of the AAMC; her scholarly work focuses on medical education endeavors, including the scrutiny of systems of medical education assessment for racial/ethnic- and gender-based disparities. She has also presented on topics in nutrition education and the teaching kitchen, working with medical scribes, Entrustable Professional Activities, primary care career recruitment and mentoring, procedures training, time management in ambulatory teaching, communication skills, virtual health and telehealth, and learning communities.