School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 70 Results

  • Sushma Reddy

    Sushma Reddy

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory's expertise in cardiovascular phenotyping has led to the development of mouse models of congenital heart disease that recapitulate abnormal loading conditions on the heart. We have used these models to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease with the long term goal of identifying noninvasive diagnostic tools to better assess right ventricular health and to develop right ventricle specific therapeutics.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Pediatrics

    BioI am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • Agnes Reschke

    Agnes Reschke

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Fellow in Pediatrics

    BioAgnes Reschke, MD is a clinical fellow in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine. She obtained her bachelor of science and honors from Villanova University and after her family moved to Kentucky, went on to medical school at University of Kentucky College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency at Connecticut Children's Medical Center and during that time, focused on a clinical research project evaluating a proposed association between domestic radon levels and the development of sarcoma. Dr. Reschke ultimately came to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital for her pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship and during that time, discovered the emerging field of onco-critical care. Her fellowship research is in the lab of Tim Cornell, chief of pediatric critical care at Stanford. She is working to apply a real-time assay to measure cytokines in subsets of pediatric oncology patients to guide immunomodulatory therapies. By gaining a better understanding of these patients’ immune responses in real time, she believes that we will open the door for precision immunomodulatory therapy to treat critically ill patients, especially those experiencing sepsis or cytokine release syndrome. After completion of her hematology/oncology fellowship, Dr. Reschke will be pursuing a pediatric intensive care fellowship with the hope of becoming a leader and pioneer in onco-critical care.

  • William Rhine

    William Rhine

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity and brain injury, non-invasive biotechnologies to study cellular and organ metabolism.