School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 119 Results

  • Alexander Tarlochan Singh Sandhu

    Alexander Tarlochan Singh Sandhu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioAlex Sandhu, MD, MS is a cardiologist with a special interest in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He graduated from the seven-year combined BA-MD program at Northwestern with a focus on economics and mathematics. He completed an internal medicine residency at Stanford University, spending 16 weeks at Makerere Hospital in Uganda as part of the Global Health track. He subsequently earned a Masters in Health Services Research at Stanford while acting as a fellow in health services research at the Palo Alto VA and Stanford's Center for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research. Next, he completed fellowships in cardiology and advanced heart failure and transplant at Stanford before joining the faculty.

    Alex is now an active clinician and heart failure researcher who focuses on health economics, the implementation of high-value care strategies, comparative effectiveness, and innovative clinical trial design. He is passionate about patient care and finding ways to bring meaningful improvements to patients’ lives. He is involved in several clinical trials including the K-23 funded PRO-HF (patient centered quality of life assessments), DOT-HF (mobile device based implementation trial), and a CAC notification pilot trial (patient centered coronary artery calcification notification).

    In his free time, he enjoys playing soccer as well as entertaining and being entertained by his joyful sons, Kyle and Tyler.

  • Ryan Sandoval, M.D.

    Ryan Sandoval, M.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Sandoval is a board-certified cardiologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He completed his residency at the University of Texas at Austin, where he continued on as chief resident before going on to complete his fellowship in cardiovascular disease at the Medical University of South Carolina. Prior to his residency, he completed a research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

    His clinical interests include preventive cardiology and management of heart failure. He is particularly focused on treating patients with the complex clinical syndrome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).

    His interest in preventive cardiology grew through his participation in clinics for the uninsured and underinsured during his training. These experiences fostered his passion for understanding and addressing health care disparities. He is deeply committed to providing exceptional patient care with a personalized approach to treatment and improving the lives of his patients.

    He is a member of the American College of Cardiology.

  • Rebecca Sands

    Rebecca Sands

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sands currently serves as the Clinical Section Chief of Palliative Care at Stanford University. She graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2001 with a BA in Chemistry. She then attended Midwestern University, Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine from 2002-2006. She completed a residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance in Cambridge, MA and went on to complete her Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM) fellowship at the Harvard combined program at Massachusetts General Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute in 2011. She spent 8 years at the University of Pittsburgh where she served as core teaching faculty and the HPM Fellowship Program Director. Her clinical work has focused on the intersection of oncology and palliative care. Her primary interests are in mentorship and the advancement of palliative care within the structure of academic medicine including ambulatory practice. She has a particular focus on resiliency skill development for trainees, staff, and faculty as well a commitment to the innovation of ways to create meaning in our everyday lives as health care professionals.

  • Christine Santiago

    Christine Santiago

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioDr. Christine Santiago is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Stanford Division of Hospital Medicine with a deep commitment to improving healthcare access and equity. Dr. Santiago earned her M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School graduating cum laude and completed an M.P.H. in Health Policy and Management at the University of California Berkeley.

    Throughout her career, Dr. Santiago has actively engaged in various leadership roles and initiatives, such as co-founding the Stanford Health Equity, Advocacy and Research Program (Stanford HEARs), a resident-led program aimed at addressing healthcare disparities. She also had the privilege of serving as Chief Resident, where she supported educational activities and mentored fellow residents.

    With a strong focus on diversity and inclusion, Dr. Santiago has been involved in multiple professional associations, including the American College of Physicians and the California Medical Association, to promote diversity within healthcare. Additionally, she has contributed to curriculum development, mentorship programs, and research activities, all in the pursuit of advancing healthcare, improving patient outcomes and creating a more equitable healthcare system for all patients.

  • Anuja Anand Sathe

    Anuja Anand Sathe

    Instructor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in understanding the determinants of therapeutic resistance in cancer. I investigate the composition of the tumor microenvironment and adaptive responses to therapy using single-cell and spatial approaches.

  • Amelia Sattler, MD

    Amelia Sattler, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrently working on projects identifying effective use of actual patient encounters in undergraduate medical education. Specifically interested in the role of actual patient encounters in the training of shared decision making. Also interested in medical student empathy and physician wellness.

    Also working on many different projects in the realm of quality improvement and population health in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health.

  • Thomas Robert Savage

    Thomas Robert Savage

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine
    Masters Student in Biomedical Informatics, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioDr Thomas Savage is a Hospitalist at Stanford University Hospital. He teaches residents and medical students on the general medicine service as well as covers the oncology, cardiology and transplant services as a nocturnist. His research interests include artificial intelligence applications to medicine and wearable medical devices.

  • John Scandling

    John Scandling

    Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTolerance induction in clinical kidney transplantation