School of Medicine


Showing 21-28 of 28 Results

  • Christina (Christy) Tise, MD, PhD

    Christina (Christy) Tise, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (genetics)

    BioDr. Christina (Christy) Tise is a physician scientist and Assistant Professor in the Division of Medical Genetics at Stanford with subspecialty training in Clinical Biochemical Genetics. Dr. Tise has developed multiple research projects focused on the clinical impact of biochemical genetic conditions in pregnancy and newborn health, including a project focused on unforeseen diagnoses in individuals initially identified through state newborn screening which has resulted in a number of publications.

    Dr. Tise also researches the genetic etiologies of recurrent pregnancy loss and the impact of inherited metabolic conditions on human reproduction. She is involved in several research initiatives including contributing to the development of TRIOS, a multi-site, NIH-funded research study to evaluate the genetic causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. In serving as the primary research mentor for a recent Masters of Genetic Counseling graduate, Dr. Tise’s research on carrier and newborn screening has highlighted areas of ancestry-related healthcare inequities specific to the field of Medical Genetics.

    Dr. Tise’s primary academic and advocacy interests are embodied in this work, specifically the overlap between biochemical and molecular analysis, and the clinical utility of innovative technologies for diagnosis and treatment of genetic disease. This is an unbelievably thrilling time for the field of Medical Genetics, as it promises immense progress and opportunity for all fields of medicine, and Dr. Tise is determined, honored, and incredibly excited to be a part of it!

    Research interests: newborn screening, carrier screening, prenatal screening, genetics of recurrent pregnancy loss, biochemical genetics, novel gene discovery, variant interpretation, founder populations, diagnostic genetic testing, bioethics, GWAS/ExWAS

  • Natalie Torok

    Natalie Torok

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is focused on exploring the role of matrix remodeling in disease progression in metabolic dysfunction steatohepatitis (MASH)-related hepatocellular carcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Our goal is to uncover how biomechanical characteristics of the ECM affect mechano-sensation, and how these pathways could ultimately be targeted. We are also interested in aging and its effects on metabolic pathways in MASH and HCC.

  • Jennifer Tremmel

    Jennifer Tremmel

    Susan P. and Riley P. Bechtel Medical Director and Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Tremmel studies sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Current research projects include evaluating sex differences in coronary pathophysiology, young patients presenting with myocardial infarction, the impact of stress on anginal symptoms, chronic total coronary occlusions, and vascular access site complications.

  • Jennifer Tsai

    Jennifer Tsai

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioJennifer is a researcher in clinical development of novel therapeutics for hematologic diseases. She has a special interest in bone marrow failure and rare pediatric disorders.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    BioDr. Tsui completed his medical training at Dalhousie University, Halifax, in 1995 after obtaining his Masters of Science in Pharmacy in 1991. These degrees followed a Diploma in Engineering and Bachelors of Science in both Mathematics and Pharmacy. Dr. Tsui completed his anesthesia residency training at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton in 2000, and he received further experience in pediatric anesthesia at British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver. After 16 years of practice at the University of Alberta Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital, Dr. Tsui was recruited to Stanford University in 2016.

    Currently, Dr. Tsui is a University Medical Line Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. In his position as an adult and pediatric anesthesiologist at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, he specializes in regional anesthesia techniques.

    Dr. Tsui is an avid and internationally recognized researcher in many areas of regional anesthesia. During his residency, Dr. Tsui developed an interest in improving the accuracy of epidural catheter placement and was issued a U.S. patent in relation to his research. Dr. Tsui has expanded his research into the use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia, with particular relevance to peripheral nerve block performance. Dr. Tsui is also responsible for development of the E-Catheter catheter-over-needle kit for use during peripheral nerve blocks. The primary objective of his research is to transform regional anesthesia from an “art” into a reliable and reproducible “science” by further exploring the basic scientific and clinical aspects of electrophysiological signal monitoring and integrating this with the latest advances in ultrasound.

    Academically, Dr. Tsui received the 2005 John Bradley Young Educator Award from the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society. This award recognizes his work as a clinical educator, researcher, and anesthesia trainee role model. While in Canada, Dr. Tsui was the only Canadian invited to write a chapter for a prestigious American anesthesia textbook - Clinical Anesthesia (Barash). Dr. Tsui wrote the first textbook on Ultrasound- and Nerve Stimulation-Guided Regional Anesthesia. It's become the main reference for anesthesiologists who are interested to use ultrasound in regional anesthesia. This work was translated to Korean. Dr. Tsui also co-authored the first pediatric textbook on the subject, the Pediatric Atlas of Ultrasound- and Nerve Stimulation-Guided Regional Anesthesia. This work has also been translated (Chinese) and received positive reviews. In addition, Dr. Tsui co-authored and edited "Principles of Airway Management" and "Complications in Regional Anesthesia." From 2006 to 2018, Dr. Tsui served on the editorial board of the Canadian Journal of Anesthesia. Dr. Tsui is currently the editor of the journal of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine.

    Dr. Tsui has received the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Clinical Scholar award and has previously received research awards and grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society, AHFMR, and University of Alberta. In 2015, a prestigious award, the CAS Research Recognition Award, was presented by the Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society to Dr. Tsui "in recognition of significant research contributions to regional anesthesia, acute pain management and pediatric anesthesia in Canada and around the world". In 2022, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) awarded Dr. Tsui, the Distinguish Service Award. This prestigious annual award has been presented to honor persons who have made remarkable contributions to the field of regional anesthesia and pain medicine.

  • Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioJason Tucciarone MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor with Stanford School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He works collaboratively in the department’s Neuropsychiatry clinic and his clinical focus includes treating patients with diverse and complex presentations at the interface of psychiatry and neurology with particular interest in functional neurological disorders. He sees a small cohort of psychotherapy patients in Individual Psychotherapy Clinic. He also works weekend shifts on Stanford’s inpatient psychiatry units.

    As a neuroscientist, he is interested in preclinical models of mental illness and investigating new therapies for mood disorders and addiction. In particular, he is interested in defining new cell types and evolutionary conserved circuits in emotional processing centers of the brain with the hope of finding new entry points for novel therapeutics. Currently under the mentorship Dr Robert Malenka, he is using optogenetic, chemogenetic, neuroimaging and behavioral approaches in mouse models of addiction to uncover vulnerable brain circuitry in opioid use disorder. Under the mentorship of Dr Alan Schatzberg he is investigating the efficacy of buprenorphine augmentation to IV ketamine infusion at reducing suicidality in treatment resistant depression.

    Prior to training in psychiatry at Stanford’s research residency track Jason received his bachelor’s degree in biology and philosophy from Union College. He spent three years as a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke investigating and developing MRI reportable contrast agents to map neuronal connectivity. Following this he entered the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at the State University of NY Stony Brook University. There he completed a doctoral dissertation in neuroscience under the mentorship Dr. Josh Huang at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. His thesis work employed mouse genetic dissections of excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits with a focus on the circuitry of chandelier inhibitory interneurons in prefrontal cortex.

    In addition to his research and clinical work, Jason is passionate about teaching, mentorship, and resident clinical supervision. He joined a working group early in his clinical residency to restructure trainee’s neuroscience education. He teaches introductory lectures in the neuroscience of addiction, PTSD, psychosis, and mood disorders. He also leads resident group supervision in their introductory psychodynamic psychotherapy clinical experience. He supervises medical students, residents, and clinical fellows in Neuropsychiatry clinic. Finally, to contribute to the Stanford clinical community, he leads a support group for Internal Medicine interns and residents.