School of Medicine


Showing 21-37 of 37 Results

  • Julie Williamson, DO, FAAP

    Julie Williamson, DO, FAAP

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics - Critical Care

    BioDr. Williamson practices pediatric anesthesiology and critical care. She is committed to undergraduate and graduate medical education, and has served as an Educator-for-CARE at the Stanford School of Medicine and as a program director for Anesthesiology at Emory University. She is affiliated with several mentoring and advising programs, including the Stanford Anesthesiology Mentoring Program and the Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative for Pediatric Anesthesiologists.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Dean Winslow

    Dean Winslow

    Professor of Medicine (Hospital Medicine), by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioDean Winslow, MD is Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics and is a Senior Fellow (courtesy) at CISAC/Freeman Spogli Institute. He has served on the Stanford faculty since 1998 and from 2003-2008 as Co-Director of Stanford's Infectious Diseases Fellowship Training Program. He was in private practice in Wilmington, Delaware where he started the state’s first multidisciplinary clinic for HIV patients in 1985. In 1988 he joined the DuPont Company where he worked both as a bench scientist on HIV drug resistance then designed the clinical trials supporting FDA approval of efavirenz. In 1999 he became Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at Visible Genetics Inc. and led the FDA clearance of the TRUGENE HIV-1 drug resistance test. Dr. Winslow joined the staff at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in 2003, where he served as Chief of the Division of AIDS Medicine and later as Chair of the Department of Medicine. In 2015 he was appointed Vice Chair of the Department of Medicine at Stanford and Academic Physician-In-Chief at Stanford/ValleyCare. He was a Resident Fellow in Robinson House 2013-2017 and was visiting faculty at Oxford University in 2017. He was Lead Physician for the US Antarctic Program of the National Science Foundation 2019-2020 based at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. In 2021 he took leave from Stanford to lead the US COVID-19 Testing and Diagnostic Working Group. He also served as CDC Senior Advisor to Operation ALLIES WELCOME and Chief Medical Officer for the Southwest Border Migrant Health Task Force before returning to Stanford in July 2022.

    Dr. Winslow is a Master of the American College of Physicians, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. He is the author of 94 papers. He is,a member of the IDSA Sepsis Task Force, and previously served as Chair of the Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee.

    Colonel Winslow entered the Air National Guard in 1980 and was a Distinguished Graduate of the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine. He served as Commander of the 159th Medical Group 1992-1995 and was State Air Surgeon, Delaware Air National Guard 1995-2011. He served as ANG Assistant to the Commander, 59th Medical Wing, Joint Base San Antonio 2011-2014. Colonel Winslow deployed to the Middle East six times after 9/11 as a flight surgeon supporting combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. From Jan-April 2003 Colonel Winslow was the flight surgeon responsible for combat rescue operations from northern Iraq to Tikrit. In 2005 he coordinated military public health in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In 2006 Colonel Winslow served as an ER physician at the United States Air Force 447th EMEDS (combat hospital) in Baghdad and in 2008 he served as hospital commander during the Iraq surge. He is a 2007 graduate of Air War College. He served as an infectious disease consultant to the USAF Surgeon General. In 2017 Dr. Winslow was nominated by the President to serve as Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. He has 3,000 civilian and 1150 military flying hours including 431 combat hours and 263 combat sorties. He has extensive operational experience in fighter, tactical airlift, and combat rescue missions. He holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot license.

    Since 2006 Dr. Winslow has arranged medical care in the U.S. for 28 Iraqi children who have complicated medical conditions for which care is not available in Iraq. In 2015, Dr. Winslow and his wife, Dr. Julie Parsonnet, created The Eagle Fund of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, which provides aid to middle eastern and central American refugees. In 2018 he co-founded Scrubs Addressing the Firearms Epidemic (SAFE), which unites health care professionals to address gun violence in the US as a public health issue and to advocate for education, research, and evidence-backed policy to reduce gun violence.

  • Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Richard E. Behrman, MD, Professor of Child Health and Society, Professor of Health Policy and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
    On Leave from 02/01/2024 To 12/20/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHe is a health policy and outcomes researcher whose work has focused on children's health; health-outcomes disparities by race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status; the interaction of genetics and the environment as these factors influence child and maternal health; and the impact of medical technology on disparities in health outcomes.

  • Jadene Wong

    Jadene Wong

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests- Care of the Infant with Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS)
    https://www.cpqcc.org/resources/neonatal-opioid-withdrawal-syndrome-nows-toolkit
    https://nastoolkit.org/
    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/episode-17-neonatal-abstinence-syndrome-dr-jadene-wong/id1581530231?i=1000558004429

    - Primary Care for Preterm Infants and Children
    https://www.cpqcc.org/preterm-primary-care-toolkit

  • Jennifer Woo, MD

    Jennifer Woo, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Woo is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiologist with the Adult Congenital Heart Program at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Divisions of Cardiovascular Medicine and Pediatric Cardiology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She diagnoses and treats a range of cardiovascular diseases, with a focus on adult congenital heart disease. Dr. Woo has Level III training with the National Board of Echocardiography, a certification that recognizes her experience in complex cardiac imaging. She also has specialized expertise in cardiac MRI. Each of her patients receives a personalized, comprehensive care plan delivered with compassion.

    Dr. Woo is heavily involved in adult congenital heart disease research. She has a particular interest in imaging and heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease. She has received grant funding for her work, including from the Adult Congenital Heart Association. The National Institutes of Health awarded granted her the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award.

    She has published research in several peer-reviewed journals, such as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Pediatric Cardiology. Dr. Woo has presented her findings at regional and national meetings, including the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Bay Area Conference and the International Symposium on Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Dr. Woo is a member of the Adult Congenital Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and American Society of Echocardiography.

  • Ana Vanessa Adams Wren

    Ana Vanessa Adams Wren

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioClinical Focus:
    Psychology
    Child and Adolescent Psychology
    Pediatric Pain Psychology
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Psychology

  • John Fraser Wright

    John Fraser Wright

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    BioJ Fraser Wright, PhD
    Dr. Wright received his PhD in 1989 from the University of Toronto (Biochemistry) for studies
    characterizing the interaction of complement with IgM, and completed post-doctoral studies at INSERM
    / CENG Grenoble, France in molecular immunology focused on antigen processing and presentation. He
    was awarded a CRCS/ MRC Scholarship, gaining faculty appointment at the University of Toronto. In
    1996 he joined industry as a Scientist at Pasteur Sanofi, contributing there to the development of
    vaccines and cancer immunotherapies, and subsequently as Director of Development and Clinical
    Manufacturing at Avigen, a gene therapy company that pioneered AAV-based investigational gene
    therapies for hemophilia and Parkinson’s disease. In 2004 he returned to academia, establishing and
    directing the Clinical Vector Facility at the Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics at Children’s
    Hospital of Philadelphia, and gaining faculty appointment at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman
    School of Medicine as professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Dr. Wright has contributed to
    several clinical development programs in gene therapy, including for Luxturna and Kymriah, the first
    gene therapies for a genetic (RPE65 deficiency) and non-genetic (CAR-T immunotherapy) disease,
    respectively, approved in the United States, and for the first gene therapy clinical trial that delivered an
    AAV-vectorized monoclonal antibody to human subjects for HIV passive immunity. He is a Co-founder of
    Spark Therapeutics, serving there and subsequently at Axovant as Chief Technology Officer. In 2019 Dr.
    Wright joined Stanford University as Professor of Pediatrics at The Center for Definitive and Curative
    Medicine (CDCM). His research program aims to address key immunological barriers to gene therapy
    through innovative approaches to viral vector design and generation, and to develop vectorized
    antibodies for serious human diseases.

  • Sean M. Wu

    Sean M. Wu

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab seeks to identify mechanisms regulating cardiac lineage commitment during embryonic development and the biology of cardiac progenitor cells in development and disease. We believe that by understanding the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation, we can identify the most effective ways to repair diseased adult hearts. We employ mouse and human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as rodents as our in vivo models for investigation.

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Pediatric Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.