School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 39 Results

  • Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Binkley is a radiation oncologist specializing in lymphoma treatment and an assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology.

    His clinical expertise includes stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), total lymphoid and total body irradiation, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).

    For each patient, Dr. Binkley develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. His goals are to improve both health and quality of life.

    Dr. Binkley has conducted extensive research to advance cancer treatment. In his post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford, he studied the use of genomic signatures to predict response to radiotherapy. His current clinical and laboratory research seek to identify prognostic and predictive clinical, radiographic, and genomic factors to inform individualized treatment strategies.

    He has co-authored articles on his research discoveries published in Cancer Discovery, Blood, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, and elsewhere. Topics have included innovations in the treatment of lymphoma and lung cancer.

    He also has made invited presentations to colleagues at national and international conferences. He has presented the latest findings on radiation therapy for lung cancer and lymphoma at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma (ICML).

    Honors for Dr. Binkley include the Malcolm A. Bagshaw Award for leadership and outstanding scientific achievement. This award is named for a pioneer in radiation therapy and former chair of the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Binkley is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and American Association for Cancer Research. He is a founding member of the Global nLPHL One Working (GLOW) Working Group, an international collaboration studying nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) in children and adults.

  • Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPatient-centered and artificial intelligence-augmented medical decision making

  • Rishabh Chaudhari, MD

    Rishabh Chaudhari, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    BioDr. Chaudhari is a radiation oncologist with the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in delivering image-guided interventions for all forms of cancer, including lung, breast, prostate, and head and neck. He treats conditions including mesothelioma, seminoma, renal cell carcinoma, and vulvar cancer.

    In every case, he develops a comprehensive, compassionate care plan personalized to the unique needs of each patient. His goal is always to deliver innovative, compassionate care of the highest quality to help each patient achieve the best possible outcome.

    Dr. Chaudhari conducts research into leading-edge treatments, allowing him to offer the most advanced care options. He has investigated stereotactic body radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer and for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. He has also studied the effects of radiotherapy on breast cancer stem cells and extramedullary plasmacytomas. He also is currently studying the use of proton beam therapy on recurrent head and neck cancers.

    Dr. Chaudhari has presented his research findings at meetings of the Radiation Research Society, Society for Thermal Medicine, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and World Congress of Brachytherapy. He has published articles on radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer in the journal Lung Cancer: Targets and Therapy. He also co-authored the chapter “Renal and Adrenal Vasculature: Anatomy and Imaging” in the textbook Image-Guided Interventions. He is a reviewer for Cancer Medicine.

    In previous positions, Dr. Chaudhari served on committees dedicated to care quality assurance and to the monitoring of cancer care protocols. Other areas of interest include radiation oncology department operations and advising radiation oncology residents.

    Dr. Chaudhari is a member of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

  • Alexander Chin, MD, MBA

    Alexander Chin, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    BioAlexander Chin, MD, MBA, is a radiation oncologist with Stanford Medicine Cancer Center and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology with the Stanford School of Medicine. He also serves as Director of Market Development for Stanford Health Care, acting as a liaison between faculty leadership and hospital administration, to advance Stanford Medicine’s mission of providing compassionate leading-edge care to the communities that we serve.

    Dr. Chin is committed to ensuring the delivery of care of the highest quality and value. He provides clinical expertise in diagnosing and treating the full range of cancers, including those of the lung, breast, and central nervous system. In addition, he serves on national leadership teams formed to advance the practice of cancer care. Dr. Chin is currently a member of the Payment Reform Task Force for the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has previously served on their Clinical Practice Committee and as a health policy fellow. He was one of just two oncologists in the US selected to participate in a year-long program on policy leadership.

    He currently serves on the Stanford Cancer Network Quality Committee. This team develops and implements our care delivery standards, strategies, and metrics to ensure consistently excellent cancer care from all Stanford Health Care providers in all locations.

    Dr. Chin has conducted extensive research and published his findings in numerous peer-reviewed journals. Topics range from novel oncology payment models to the use of new imaging parameters in lung cancer. His scholarship appears in Cancer, JCO Oncology Practice, Clinical Lung Cancer, International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, and elsewhere.

    He has made presentations on stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and other treatment advances at meetings of the Radiological Society of North America and American Society for Radiation Oncology. He also has addressed these topics as an invited lecturer in training sessions for oncology residents.

    He has won numerous awards, including recognition for his research from the Radiological Society of North America. He also has earned honors from the American Society of Clinical Oncology and from his alma maters: the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania as well as Wharton and Yale.

    Dr. Chin earned a Bachelor of Science degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. He earned his medical degree from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and his MBA at the Wharton School. He completed his residency in Radiation Oncology at Stanford Health Care.

    He is a member of the Radiological Society of North America, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and American Society for Clinical Oncology.

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Jack, Lulu, and Sam Willson Professor and Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • Sarah S. Donaldson, MD

    Sarah S. Donaldson, MD

    Catharine and Howard Avery Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCombined Modality Treatment of Cancer
    Late Effects of Treatment
    Genetic Effects of Cancer
    Rhabdomyosarcoma
    Hodgkins Disease
    Pediatric Radiation Oncolgy
    Pediatric Oncolgy
    Breast Cancer
    Conformal Radiotherapy/IMRT
    Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases

  • Michael Gensheimer

    Michael Gensheimer

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn addition to my clinical research in head and neck and lung cancer, I work on the application of computer science and machine learning to cancer research. I develop tools for analyzing large datasets to improve outcomes and safety of cancer treatment. I developed a machine learning prognostic model using data from around 13,000 patients with metastatic cancer which performs better than traditional models and physicians [PubMed ID 33313792]. We recently completed a prospective randomized study in thousands of patients in which the model was used to help improve advance care planning conversations.

    I also work on the methods underpinning observational and predictive modeling research. My open source nnet-survival software that allows use of neural networks for survival modeling has been used by researchers internationally. In collaboration with the Stanford Research Informatics Center, I examined how electronic medical record (EMR) survival outcome data compares to gold-standard data from a cancer registry [PubMed ID 35802836]. The EMR data captured less than 50% of deaths, a finding that affects many studies being published that use EMR outcomes data.