School of Medicine


Showing 1-37 of 37 Results

  • Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Binkley is a radiation oncologist specializing in lymphoma treatment and an assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology.

    His clinical expertise includes stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), total lymphoid and total body irradiation, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).

    For each patient, Dr. Binkley develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. His goals are to improve both health and quality of life.

    Dr. Binkley has conducted extensive research to advance cancer treatment. In his post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford, he studied the use of genomic signatures to predict response to radiotherapy. His current clinical and laboratory research seek to identify prognostic and predictive clinical, radiographic, and genomic factors to inform individualized treatment strategies.

    He has co-authored articles on his research discoveries published in Cancer Discovery, Blood, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, and elsewhere. Topics have included innovations in the treatment of lymphoma and lung cancer.

    He also has made invited presentations to colleagues at national and international conferences. He has presented the latest findings on radiation therapy for lung cancer and lymphoma at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma (ICML).

    Honors for Dr. Binkley include the Malcolm A. Bagshaw Award for leadership and outstanding scientific achievement. This award is named for a pioneer in radiation therapy and former chair of the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Binkley is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and American Association for Cancer Research. He is a founding member of the Global nLPHL One Working (GLOW) Working Group, an international collaboration studying nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) in children and adults.

  • Martin Brown

    Martin Brown

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe seek to understand the mechanisms responsible for the resistance of cancers to treatment and to develop strategies to overcome these resistances. We are using molecular and cellular techniques and mouse models to potentiate the activity of radiation on tumors by inhibiting the bone marrow rescue of the tumor vasculature following therapy.

  • Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPatient-centered and artificial intelligence-augmented medical decision making

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Jack, Lulu, and Sam Willson Professor and Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)
    On Leave from 11/27/2023 To 08/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrently collaborating with Dr's Aaron Newman and Michael Clarke to study cancer stem cells associated with triple negative breast cancer. Advancing studies of FLASH radiotherapy in preclinical models for potential future use in humans. Investigating preclinical use of high dose gaseous nitric oxide in the treatment of solid tumors.

  • Scott Dixon

    Scott Dixon

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is interested in the relationship between cell death and metabolism. Using techniques drawn from many disciplines my laboratory is investigating how perturbation of intracellular metabolic networks can result in novel forms of cell death, such as ferroptosis. We are interested in applying this knowledge to find new ways to treat diseases characterized by insufficient (e.g. cancer) or excessive (e.g. neurodegeneration) cell death.

  • Michael Gensheimer

    Michael Gensheimer

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn addition to my clinical research in head and neck and lung cancer, I work on the application of computer science and machine learning to cancer research. I develop tools for analyzing large datasets to improve outcomes and safety of cancer treatment. I developed a machine learning prognostic model using data from around 13,000 patients with metastatic cancer which performs better than traditional models and physicians [PubMed ID 33313792]. We recently completed a prospective randomized study in thousands of patients in which the model was used to help improve advance care planning conversations.

    I also work on the methods underpinning observational and predictive modeling research. My open source nnet-survival software that allows use of neural networks for survival modeling has been used by researchers internationally. In collaboration with the Stanford Research Informatics Center, I examined how electronic medical record (EMR) survival outcome data compares to gold-standard data from a cancer registry [PubMed ID 35802836]. The EMR data captured less than 50% of deaths, a finding that affects many studies being published that use EMR outcomes data.

  • Amato J. Giaccia

    Amato J. Giaccia

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDuring the last five years, we have identified several small molecules that kill VHL deficient renal cancer cells through a synthetic lethal screening approach. Another major interest of my laboratory is in identifying hypoxia-induced genes involved in invasion and metastases. We are also investigating how hypoxia regulates gene expression epigenetically.

  • Iris C. Gibbs, MD, FACR, FASTRO

    Iris C. Gibbs, MD, FACR, FASTRO

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 04/22/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Gibbs is a board-certified radiation oncologist who specializes in the treatment of CNS tumors. Her research focuses on developing new radiation techniques to manage brain and spinal tumors in adults and children. Dr. Gibbs has gained worldwide acclaim for her expertise in Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery.

  • Edward Graves

    Edward Graves

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplications of molecular imaging in radiation therapy, development of hypoxia and radiosensitivity imaging techniques, small animal image-guided conformal radiotherapy, image processing and analysis.

  • Xuejun Gu

    Xuejun Gu

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Medical Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArtificial intelligence in medicine
    Medical imaging and image anlysis
    Treatment planning and clinical decision-making
    FLASH radiobiology study ;

  • Philip C. Hanawalt

    Philip C. Hanawalt

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor in Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interest includes two principal areas:

    1. The molecular basis for diseases in which the pathway of transcription-coupled DNA repair is defective, including Cockyne syndrome (CS) and UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS). Patients are severely sensitive to sunlight but get no cancers. See Hanawalt & Spivak, 2008, for review.

    2. Transcription arrest by guanine-rich DNA sequences and non-canonical secondary structures. Transcription collisions with replication forks.

  • Stefan Heller

    Stefan Heller

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the inner ear, from its earliest manifestation as one of the cranial placodes until it has developed into a mature and functioning organ. We are interested in how the sensory epithelia of the inner ear that harbor the sensory hair cells develop, how the cells mature, and how these epithelia respond to toxic insults. The overarching goal of this research is to find ways to regenerate lost sensory hair cells in mammals.

  • Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Kalbasi is a board-certified radiation oncologist and physician-scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute. He is also an associate professor of radiation oncology at Stanford Medicine and a project member of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    In the clinic, Dr. Kalbasi specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors, especially sarcoma and melanoma, with a focus on bringing new treatments to patients. This focus includes using advanced techniques in radiation oncology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Dr. Kalbasi's NIH-funded laboratory studies the cancer-immune interface in various therapeutic contexts, including T cell therapy, cytokine therapy and innate immune agonism. The lab has described tumor cell-, T cell- and myeloid cell-intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to therapy and approaches to overcome therapy resistance. Dr. Kalbasi is also an experienced leader of clinical trials related to immunotherapy, T cell therapy and radiation therapy.

    Prior to his arrival at Stanford Health Care, Dr. Kalbasi was assistant professor of radiation oncology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chief of sarcoma radiotherapy at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. During his tenure, he was named a NextGen Star by the American Association of Cancer Research in recognition for excellence in cancer research.

    Dr. Kalbasi’s work has been published in leading journals including Nature, Science Translational Medicine, JAMA Oncology, Lancet Oncology, Nature Cancer and Cancer Discovery. He has served as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has also presented research to his peers at the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  • Susan Knox

    Susan Knox

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include 1) study of the effect of radiation on regulatory cell subpopulations and co-stimulatory molecules, 2) use of radiation as an immune modulator for optimization of transplant regimens, 3) the role of radiation in tumor vaccine strategies, 4) study of new radiosensitizers and radioprotectors, and 5) discovery of new targeted therapies for the treatment of solid tumors.

  • Quynh-Thu Le, MD

    Quynh-Thu Le, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory research interest focuses on the identification of biomarkers for prognosis in patients with head & neck or lung cancers. I am also conducting a number of clinical trials specifically in patients with head & neck cancers.

  • John Leppert

    John Leppert

    Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Nephrology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research aims to improve the global quality of care for patients with Urologic Cancer with a particular focus on kidney cancer. We are investigating novel proteomic platforms and assays to diagnose kidney cancer and predict response to therapy. We are evaluating the comparative effectiveness of various kidney cancer surgeries and their impact on chronic kidney disease and its downstream effects. We are applying epidemiology, bioinformatics, and health services methods to urologic conditions.

  • Lingyin Li

    Lingyin Li

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    BioDr. Li is an associate professor in the Biochemistry Department and ChEM-H Institute at Stanford since 2015. Her lab works on understanding biochemical mechanisms of innate immunity and harnessing it to treat cancer. She majored in chemistry at University of Science and Technology of China and graduated with a B. En in 2003. She then trained with Dr. Laura Kiessling, a pioneer in chemical biology, at University of Wisconsin-Madison and graduated with a Ph.D in chemistry in 2010. She obtained her postdoctoral training with Dr. Timothy Mitchison at Harvard Medical School, who introduced her to the field of chemical immunology.

  • Wu Liu

    Wu Liu

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheranostic nanoparticles for radiosensitization and medical imaging. Novel treatment technique for ocular disease radiotherapy. Radio-neuromodulation using focused kV x-rays. Use artificial intelligence in image guided radiotherapy and medical image analysis. Ultrasound parametric imaging.

  • Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2) Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis repair, 4) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 5) Skeletal Stem Cells, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

  • Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical specialty is precision targeted radiotherapy of thoracic cancers.

    My research is on developing next-generation ultra-rapid radiation therapy technology (PHASER) and studying the radiobiological effects of FLASH treatment.

    My clinical research is on advanced 4-D image-guided radiation therapy and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), and functional and metabolic imaging and imaging biomarkers.

  • Ashby Morrison

    Ashby Morrison

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research interests are to elucidate the contribution of chromatin to mechanisms that promote genomic integrity.

  • Aaron Newman

    Aaron Newman

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group develops computational strategies to study the phenotypic diversity, differentiation hierarchies, and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets and their surrounding microenvironments. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the ultimate goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

  • Guillem Pratx

    Guillem Pratx

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Physical Oncology Lab is interested in making a lasting impact on translational cancer research by building novel physical tools and methods.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

  • Sami Gamal-Eldin Tantawi

    Sami Gamal-Eldin Tantawi

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    BioFor over a decade I have advocated for dedicated research efforts on the basic physics of room temperature high gradient structures and new initiatives for the associated RF systems. This required demanding multidisciplinary collaboration to harness limited resources. The basic elements of the research needed to be inclusive to address not only the fundamentals of accelerator structures but also the fundamentals of associated technologies such as RF manipulation and novel microwave power sources. These basic research efforts were not bundled with specific developments for an application or a general program. The emerging technologies promise a broad, transformational impact.

    With this underlying philosophy in mind, in 2006 the US High Gradient Research Collaboration for which I am the spokesman was formed. SLAC is the host of this collaboration, which comprises MIT, ANL, University of Maryland and University of Colorado, NRL and a host of SBIR companies. This led to the revitalization of this research area worldwide. The international collaborative effort grew to include KEK in Japan, INFN, Frascati in Italy, the Cockcroft Institute in the UK, and the CLIC team at CERN.

    This effort led to a new understanding of the geometrical effects affecting high gradient operations. The collaborative work led to new advances in understanding the gradient limits of photonic band gap structures. Now we have a new optimization methodology for accelerator structure geometries and ongoing research on alternate and novel materials. These efforts doubled the usable gradient in normal conducting high gradient linacs to more than 100 MV/m, thus revitalizing the spread of the technology to other applications including compact Inverse Compton Scattering gamma-ray sources for national security applications, and compact proton linacs for cancer therapy.

  • Lucas Kas Vitzthum, MD

    Lucas Kas Vitzthum, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    BioDr. Vitzthum is a radiation oncologist and clinical associate professor of radiation oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal and thoracic cancers. He also has a clinical and research interest in oligometastatic cancer, which is cancer that has metastasized to a limited number of sites beyond its origin.

    He began his career in biomedical engineering and is passionate about integrating new technologies to advance patient care.

    Dr. Vitzthum delivers treatment personalized to each patient’s condition, overall health, and goals. He believes clear communication between doctor and patient is vital to help patients make informed care decisions.

    His research interests include clinical trial development, survivorship, and predictive modeling to personalize patient treatment. He is especially interested in pursuing research that can address unmet clinical needs.

    Dr. Vitzthum has received research support through the Radiological Society of North America, the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Conquer Cancer Foundation, and the UCSD Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute. His work has appeared in International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Annals of Oncology, JAMA Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, and other publications.

    He is a member of the American College of Radiation Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and Radiologic Society of North America.

    Dr. Vitzthum is also interested in improving access to high-quality cancer care for under-served populations domestically and abroad.

  • Lei Xing

    Lei Xing

    Jacob Haimson and Sarah S. Donaldson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsartificial intelligence in medicine, medical imaging, Image-guided intervention, molecular imaging, biology guided radiation therapy (BGRT), treatment plan optimization

  • Jiangbin Ye

    Jiangbin Ye

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne hallmark of cancer is that malignant cells modulate metabolic pathways to promote cancer progression. My professional interest is to investigate the causes and consequences of the abnormal metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells in response to microenvironmental stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, with the prospect that therapeutic approaches might be developed to target these metabolic pathways to improve cancer treatment.