School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 126 Results

  • Bruce T. Adornato

    Bruce T. Adornato

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Adornato joined the Department of Neurology as Voluntary Clinical Faculty in 1978, (subsequently Adjunct Clinical Faculty) and has served as Director of the Neuromuscular Laboratory from 1978 until 1983, performing and interpreting nerve and muscle biopsies as well as serving as attending physician directing residents and medical students in the diagnosis and care of his private patients admitted to Stanford Hospital. Since 1986, he has been attending physician at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, directing Stanford Neurology residents and medical students in the care of veterans. He has published 69 peer reviewed papers and a number of book chapters in the field of neurology. He is currently the medical officer of a silicon valley startup exploring mobility devices for the neurologically impaired.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and their intersection with chronic pain.

  • Richard Baron, MD

    Richard Baron, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Baron is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic and the Vestibular Balance Disorders Program. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and, by courtesy, in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received fellowship training in both headache medicine and otoneurology (dizziness and vestibular disorders) at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in diagnosing, managing, and treating the many causes of headache, facial pain, and dizziness. To provide the highest level of care, he takes a detailed history, performs a specialized physical exam, and collaborates with colleagues across the Stanford Health Care system. Dr. Baron develops a comprehensive care plan customized for each patient. He specializes in non-medication options, nerve blocks and other advanced treatments, Botox® injections, and the latest headache medications and devices.

    Dr. Baron has a particular interest in the management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), which results from pressure around the brain and causes headaches and problems with vision. He has established a multidisciplinary group of Stanford Health Care doctors to improve and coordinate care for people with IIH. The group includes doctors from several departments, including neuro-ophthalmology, neurosurgery, interventional radiology, and bariatric surgery and medical weight loss. They work together to determine the most effective medical and procedural treatments.

    Dr. Baron also has a strong interest in the evaluation of acute vestibular syndromes and the management of dizziness in the emergency room. He has published in Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, and Translational Behavioral Medicine. He has also written several chapters for the Stanford Neurology Resident Handbook. He has presented his research at conferences throughout the United States, and he is heavily involved with quality improvement projects and educating resident physicians.

    Dr. Baron is a member of the American Headache Society, American Academy of Neurology, Catholic Medical Association, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic and clinical research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how they affect short-term brain injury and long term outcomes like dementia and depression.

  • Felix Chang, MD

    Felix Chang, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Felix Chang's clinical practice mainly involves intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) and the treatment of neurological disorders with botulinum toxin. He earned his medical degree at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He completed his neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He then went on to complete a fellowship in clinical neurophysiology with a focus in intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring at Stanford.

  • S. Charles Cho, MD

    S. Charles Cho, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research focused on peripheral nerve and muscle disorders. Also involved with prevention of cerebrovascular disesase in the intraoperative setting. Ongoing clincial studies include treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy and HIV neuropathic pain.

  • Robert P. Cowan, MD, FAAN, FAHS

    Robert P. Cowan, MD, FAAN, FAHS

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest focus on patient education technology and patient/physician communication with a particular emphasis on tools which increase encounter efficiency and improve outcomes. Basic research focuses on mechanisms of action in Chronic Daily Headache, with a particular emphasis on New Daily Persistent Headache. Techniques include fMRI, biomarker investigation and evoked potentials. Clinical research includes clinical trials of novel treatments for episodic and chronic headache forms.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology), of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Partial Leave from 03/15/2024 To 06/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Les Dorfman, MD

    Les Dorfman, MD

    Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical electrophysiology of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including nerve conduction velocity; electromyography (EMG); and visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and treatment. Neurological education.

  • Rachelle Dugue, MD, PhD

    Rachelle Dugue, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Dugue is a board-certified neurologist within the Neurohospitalist Division. She cares for patients at both Stanford Health Care and Stanford Health Care Tri-Valley. She received her MD and PhD at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, where she completed a thesis studying novel treatments for traumatic brain injury. Dr. Dugue then completed her neurology residency at Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian, followed by a vascular neurology fellowship at Stanford University Hospital.

    Dr. Dugue provides comprehensive, individualized care for patients with a wide range of neurological conditions. She has been recognized for her dedication to excellence in patient care, medical education, and student mentorship.

    Her research interests are centered on health equity in neurology care and clinical trials, stroke, and neuroinfectious disease. Dr. Dugue has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including The Neurohospitalist, Practical Neurology, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, and Neurology.

  • Shefali Dujari, MD

    Shefali Dujari, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Dujari is a board-certified neurologist and fellowship-trained neurohospitalist, specializing in the care of acute neurologic disorders. She practices at both Stanford Hospital and Stanford ValleyCare. She completed her medical training at Boston University, internal medicine preliminary year at California Pacific Medical Center, neurology residency at Stanford University, and neurohospitalist fellowship at Stanford University. She serves as the Neurology Resident & Fellow Wellness & Mentoring Committee faculty lead, the associated program director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship, and the physician lead of the ValleyCare Neuroscience Quality Committee. She has a special interest in medical education and quality improvement.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

  • Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in the human application of emerging immunotherapies for neurological disease, focusing on Multiple Sclerosis, CIS, transverse myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). Collaborative research with Stanford and extramural scientific faculty to identify biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in humans. Clinical trials to assess efficacy of emerging treatments for MS, CIS and NMO.

  • Emmanuel During, MD

    Emmanuel During, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving diagnostics and therapeutics in RBD, using home ambulatory devices including wearable actigraphy, dry-EEG, to power clinical trials based on objective outcomes of RBD activity.

    Controlling symptoms of RBD testing drugs rigorously.

    Predicting the course of neurodegeneration using deep phenotyping using clinical and serum biomarkers, measures of autonomic impairment, skin biopsy, microbiome