School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 92 Results

  • Ranjana Advani

    Ranjana Advani

    Saul A. Rosenberg, MD, Professor of Lymphoma

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical investigation in Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas and cutaneous lymphomas. Experimental therapeutics with novel chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies.

    The research program is highly collaborative with radiation oncology, industry, pathology and dermatology.

  • Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Moghadam Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Allison Betof Warner, MD, PhD

    Allison Betof Warner, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Betof Warner is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist with the Cutaneous Oncology Program and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology. She also serves as Director of Melanoma Medical Oncology, Director of Solid Tumor Cellular Therapy, and co-Director of the Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program.

    Clinical interests of Dr. Betof Warner include treatment of advanced melanoma, immunotherapy, and cellular therapies for solid tumors. She has been a pioneer in the use of commercial tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy, which is expected to become standard of care for immunotherapy-refractory melanoma.

    Dr. Betof Warner serves as the leader of the Melanoma & Cutaneous Oncology Clinical Research Group, with research interests focused on tumor response to immunotherapy. She has been the principal investigator of multiple clinical trials focusing on immunotherapy-refractory melanoma and is internationally recognized for her expertise in central nervous system metastases and the use of novel cellular therapies. Dr. Betof Warner collaborates with investigators around the world in surgery, neuro-oncology, neurosurgery, radiation oncology, and pathology. She has received funding and awards for her clinical and translational investigative work from multiple high-profile organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Melanoma Research Foundation.

    In addition to publishing her research in peer-reviewed journals, Dr. Betof Warner has served as an editorial and grant reviewer for multiple organizations, including the Melanoma Research Foundation. She has authored book chapters and case reports, contributed to national guidelines, and presented her findings at regional, national, and international meetings.

    Dr. Betof Warner is a member of multiple professional organizations and societies, including the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, where she serves on the Early Career Scientist Committee. She is also a member of the American College of Sports Medicine and the European Society for Medical Oncology.

  • Douglas W. Blayney

    Douglas W. Blayney

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving the quality of cancer care at Stanford, in our network of care, and nationally

  • Nam Quoc Bui

    Nam Quoc Bui

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Bui is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Cancer Institute and a specialist in Sarcoma. Dr. Bui earned an undergraduate degree in Computer Science at Stanford University and went on to earn his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He completed Internal Medicine residency at Stanford Hospital and Hematology/Oncology fellowship at the University of California San Diego, where he performed extensive research in bioinformatics to analyze tumor sequencing data.

    His research background and interests are in the field of bioinformatics as applied to large data sets and the study of novel compounds in rare malignancies. He is involved in numerous sarcoma clinical trials, leading efforts to take new therapeutics from the lab to clinical practice. He also is involved in education at the Stanford University School of Medicine, serving as a lecturer and mentor to students and trainees. Dr. Bui is the founding Editor-in-Chief of the journal “Current Problems in Cancer: Case Reports”, an international, peer-reviewed journal that publishes groundbreaking cases that give insight into redefining concepts in cancer.

  • Robert W. Carlson

    Robert W. Carlson

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology and General Internal Medicine/Medical Informatics) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical investigations in breast cancer include institutional and NSABP studies of chemoprevention, adjuvant therapy, psychosocial interventions, treatment of metastatic disease, methods of decreasing anthracycline cardiotoxicity, and modulation of multidrug resistance. Research in meta-analysis includes the performance of meta-analysis in a wide variety of settings in cancer treatment by the international Meta-Analysis Group in Cancer.

  • Jennifer Caswell-Jin

    Jennifer Caswell-Jin

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is on the translational application of next-generation sequencing technologies to breast cancer care: (1) the value of hereditary cancer genetic panel testing in clinical practice, (2) the mechanisms by which inherited genetic variants lead to breast cancer development, and (3) the analysis of somatic tumor sequencing data to inform understanding of breast tumorigenesis, metastasis, and development of resistance in response to therapeutics.

  • Amina Chaudhry, MD

    Amina Chaudhry, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Amina Chaudhry is a medical oncologist in the Division of Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine. As part of Stanford University’s Breast Cancer Program, she specializes in treating patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Dr. Chaudhry completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She gained advanced training in hematology and oncology through a fellowship at University of Illinois Chicago. She is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine.

    Dr. Chaudhry’s research focuses on improving outcomes in disadvantaged populations with breast cancer. In 2022, she received the Repurposing Research to Address Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion grant to support underrepresented patients with early-stage breast cancer.

    Dr. Chaudhry has published research in journals including Annals of Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, and Blood Advances. She has presented her work at the annual meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), and American Society of Hematology (ASH).

    Dr. Chaudhry has a strong interest in tackling healthcare inequities and improving access to clinical trials.

  • Christopher T Chen, MD

    Christopher T Chen, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Chen is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in oncology and hematology. He is also an Assistant Professor in the Division of Oncology in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Chen delivers comprehensive, compassionate care for patients in need of early drug development clinical trials and patients with gastrointestinal cancers. As a researcher, he leads the early drug development group and studies how tumor heterogeneity limits the clinical benefit of anticancer therapies in order to accelerate development of novel therapeutic strategies. Dr. Chen’s work has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Science Advances, Journal of Oncology Practice, and Health Services Research.

    Dr. Chen attended Harvard College, where he graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in molecular biology. He went to medical school at Washington University in St. Louis on a full-tuition merit scholarship, graduating with Alpha Omega Alpha honors, and did his residency training in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and hematology/oncology fellowship in the combined Harvard Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Massachusetts General Hospital program. As a fellow, he received the NIH T-32 Ruth L. Kirchstein-National Service Research Award in Cancer Biology for his work exploring the molecular structure of metastatic solid tumors.

    Dr. Chen is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, European Society for Medical Oncology, and American Association for Cancer Research.

  • Curtis R. Chong, MD, PhD, MPhil, FACP

    Curtis R. Chong, MD, PhD, MPhil, FACP

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Chong was recruited to Stanford from the Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center, where he led MSK's launch of the early drug development and immunotherapy clinical trials program in New Jersey. At MSK, Dr. Chong was a member of the gastrointestinal oncology service and was one of two MSK physicians in New Jersey who specialized in treating melanoma. Prior to joining MSK, Dr. Chong was a member of the thoracic oncology service at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and an attending physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital, all ailiates of Harvard Medical School.

    Dr. Chong completed his categorical residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, his oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and is board-certified in internal medicine and medical oncology. He has received research support from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (Young Investigator Award), Uniting Against Lung Cancer, and the American Cancer Society. Dr. Chong has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, Nature Medicine, Nature Chemical Biology, JAMA Oncology, and his research on drug discovery has been featured in the New York Times and Popular Science.

    Born and raised in Honolulu where he attended public schools, Dr. Chong sang in the Honolulu Boy Choir, and was the 1993 Honolulu Star Bulletin Newspaper Boy of the Year. He received his A.B. in biochemical sciences from Harvard University magna cum laude followed by an M.Phil. in Chemistry with Sir Alan Fersht at the University of Cambridge (Emmanuel College). He then received his MD and PhD in pharmacology from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    An intrepid traveler and avid long-distance runner, Dr. Chong has visited 54 countries and completed 126 marathons in all 50 states, 18 countries, and 6 on continents.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAfter shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Steven M. Corsello

    Steven M. Corsello

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory operates at the intersection of functional genomics and chemical biology, with the goal of advancing novel molecular mechanisms of cancer inhibition to clinical use. We aim to 1) leverage phenotypic screening and functional genomics to determine novel anti-cancer mechanisms of small molecules, 2) develop new targeted therapy approaches against solid tumors, and 3) build a comprehensive community resource for drug repurposing discovery.

  • Christina Curtis

    Christina Curtis

    RZ Cao Professor, Professor of Genetics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Curtis laboratory for Cancer Computational and Systems Biology is focused on the development and application of innovative experimental, computational, and analytical approaches to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and early detection of cancer.

  • Millie Das

    Millie Das

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Das specializes in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. She sees and treats patients both at the Stanford Cancer Center and at the Palo Alto VA Hospital. She is Chief of Oncology at the Palo Alto VA and is an active member of the VA national Lung Cancer Working Group and Lung Cancer Precision Oncology Program. In 2023, she was elected President the Association of Northern California Oncologists (ANCO), where she displays her passion for patient advocacy and also for clinician education by helping to organize Bay Area focused continuing medical education programs. She is the VA site director for the Stanford fellowship program and leads the VA thoracic tumor board on a biweekly basis. She has a strong interest in clinical research, serving as a principal investigator for multiple clinical and translational studies at the Palo Alto VA, and also as a co-investigator on all of the lung cancer trials at Stanford. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and running.

  • Milana V. Dolezal, MD, MSci

    Milana V. Dolezal, MD, MSci

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Dolezal is a board-certified hematologist-oncologist with Stanford Medicine Cancer Center in Emeryville and a clinical associate professor in the Stanford School of Medicine, Division of Oncology.

    She strives to work with patients to develop care plans that are comprehensive and personalized achieve the best possible outcomes and quality of life.

    Dr. Dolezal also has extensive experience in research and drug development. She previously held positions as a clinical scientist, assistant medical director, and associate medical director in the BioOncology Therapeutics unit of the biotechnology company Genentech.

    She has conducted clinical research into fertility preservation in patients with breast cancer, advanced treatments for triple-negative breast cancer, and patients’ adherence to anti-cancer therapy. She has co-authored articles on her research findings that appeared in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer, and other peer-reviewed publications.

    She also co-authored the chapter “Progression from Hormone-Dependent to Hormone-Independent Breast Cancer” in the textbook Hormones, Genes and Cancer published by Oxford University Press.

    Dr. Dolezal has made presentations to her peers at meetings of the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and European Cancer Organisation.

  • Alice C. Fan

    Alice C. Fan

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fan is a physician scientist who studies how turning off oncogenes (cancer genes) can cause tumor regression in preclinical and clinical translational studies. Based on her findings, she has initiated clinical trials studying how targeted therapies affect cancer signals in kidney cancer and low grade lymphoma. In the laboratory, she uses new nanotechnology strategies for tumor diagnosis and treatment to define biomarkers for personalized therapy.

  • Dean W. Felsher

    Dean W. Felsher

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies the molecular basis of cancer with a focus on understanding when cancer can be reversed through targeted oncogene inactivation.

  • George A. Fisher Jr.

    George A. Fisher Jr.

    Colleen Haas Chair in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical expertise in GI cancers with research which emphasizes Phase I and II clinical trials of novel therapies but also includes translational studies including biomarkers, molecular imaging, tumor immunology and development of immunotherapeutic trials.

  • James Ford

    James Ford

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMammalian DNA repair and DNA damage inducible responses; p53 tumor suppressor gene; transcription in nucleotide excision repair and mutagenesis; genetic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to DNA damage; genetics of inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes and human GI malignancies; clinical cancer genetics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer and mismatch repair deficient colon cancer.

  • Kristen N Ganjoo

    Kristen N Ganjoo

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGiant cell tumor of the bone
    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors
    Soft tissue sarcoma
    Osteosarcoma

  • Neel K. Gupta

    Neel K. Gupta

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have specific interest in the pathobiology and management of individuals with AIDS-related and primary central nervous system lymphomas.

  • Tanya Gupta, MD

    Tanya Gupta, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Gupta is a medical oncologist in the Stanford University Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology. In her clinical practice and research, she is dedicated to advancing the understanding and management of breast cancer.

    She is a recent recipient of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/Conquer Cancer 2020 Bonadonna Breast Cancer Research Grant. This grant supports her work as the co-investigator of a clinical trial evaluating the ctDNA status changes during adjuvant treatment of patients with early-stage triple-negative breast cancer who do not respond completely to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Dr. Gupta was a member of the combined bachelors/MD program at the University of California – San Diego. She graduated summa cum laude and was inducted into the Gold Humanism in Medicine Honor Society. She completed internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Stanford, during which time she was a recipient of the Julian Wolfsohn Award for clinical achievements in Internal Medicine and was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. She then served as a Chief Resident and Clinical Instructor in Internal Medicine. Subsequently, she stayed on at Stanford for fellowship training in Hematology and Medical Oncology.

  • Gregory M. Heestand, MD

    Gregory M. Heestand, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Heestand is a board-certified medical oncologist with a focus on gastrointestinal cancers, primarily hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and gallbladder cancer. He serves as the medical oncology champion of the Stanford Hepatobiliary Tumor Board, as well as the principal investigator of multiple clinical trials. He collaborates with campus laboratories to help develop new biomarker and treatment technologies. He is the associate director of the Stanford Hematology Oncology Fellowship Program.

    Dr. Heestand and his team take great pride in helping patients and their families face gastrointestinal cancer.

    Outside of the clinic, Dr. Heestand enjoys playing the piano, teaching his kids about music, cooking for friends and family, and surfing the internet for interesting things to read.

  • Thomas Holden, MD

    Thomas Holden, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Holden is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in care for people with gastrointestinal cancer including those of the colon, rectum, esophagus, liver, pancreas, and stomach. Dr. Holden works closely with patients to prepare personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plans that optimize healing and quality of life.

    Dr. Holden has conducted research into a wide range of subjects. He co-developed and established a multi-center trial investigating a new treatment regimen for gastric cancer. He has studied use of a fitness tracker to assess activity levels and toxicities in patients with colorectal cancer. He also has written invited commentary on the rapidly advancing field of genetic testing as well as a review on recent updates on the treatment of early-stage rectal cancer.

    He has published his research findings in articles in peer-reviewed journals including JAMA, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cortex, and elsewhere. He has made poster presentations to his peers at meetings including the ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers symposium and House Staff Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Conference, a meeting held annually at Thomas Jefferson University.

    Dr. Holden has volunteered his time and expertise to help improve access to health care for homeless and underserved populations.

    In his free time, he runs, reads, plays the acoustic guitar, and travels.

  • Sandra Horning

    Sandra Horning

    Professor of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Research Interests: clinical trials in Hodgkin's disease and malignant lymphoma including high dose therapy and autografting, complications of cytotoxic therapy, novel therapeutics, and clinicopathologic correlations.

  • Robert Hsieh

    Robert Hsieh

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioRobert W. Hsieh, M.D. Ph.D. is a medical oncologist who specializes in the treatment of prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney (renal) cancer and testicular cancer as a member of Stanford's multi-disciplinary Urologic Cancer Program. Dr. Hsieh obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Chicago (Pritzker School of Medicine) and subsequently came to Stanford to complete his Internal Medicine residency and Hematology and Oncology fellowship training (with a clinical focus on genitourinary cancers).

    Dr. Hsieh has also had extensive experience in basic lab research (cancer stem cells, target identification and validation, pre-clinical drug discovery) having done post-doctoral work in the Clarke Lab in the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. He is currently involved in early phase clinical trials in immuno-oncology in industry.

  • Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

    Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Haruka Itakura is an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) in the Stanford University School of Medicine, a data scientist, and a practicing breast medical oncologist at the Stanford Women’s Cancer Center. She is board-certified in Oncology, Clinical Informatics, Hematology, and Internal Medicine. Her research mission is to drive medical advances at the intersection of cancer and data science, applying state-of-the-art machine learning/artificial intelligence techniques to extract clinically actionable knowledge from heterogeneous multi-scale cancer data to improve patient outcomes. Her ongoing research to develop robust methodologies and apply cutting-edge techniques to analyze complex cancer big data was catapulted by an NIH K01 Career Development Award in Biomedical Big Data Science after obtaining a PhD in Biomedical Informatics at Stanford University. Her cancer research focuses on extracting radiomic (pixel-level quantitative imaging) features of tumors from medical imaging studies and applying machine learning frameworks, including radiogenomic approaches, for the integrative analysis of heterogeneous, multi-omic (e.g., radiomic, genomic, transcriptomic) data to accelerate discoveries in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Her current projects include prediction modeling of survival, treatment response, recurrence, and CNS metastasis in different cancer subtypes; detection of occult invasive breast cancer; and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Her ultimate goal is to be able to translate her research findings back to the clinical setting for the benefit of patients with difficult-to-treat cancers.

  • Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: general oncology, sarcomas. Research Interests: clinical trials in solid tumors.

  • Hanlee P. Ji

    Hanlee P. Ji

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 03/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development, cancer rearrangements, genome sequencing, big data analysis

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Tyler Johnson

    Tyler Johnson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Tyler Johnson is a physician, author, educator, and humanitarian. At the Stanford University School of Medicine, he has held an appointment as a clinical assistant professor for six years. A medical oncologist, Dr. Johnson sees patients with all types of gastrointestinal malignancies and particularly focuses on patients with neuroendocrine tumors, colon cancer, and pancreas cancer.

    Dr. Johnson also serves as a leader of the Stanford inpatient oncology services, including supervising the oncology housestaff service. He is responsible, in conjunction with other leaders, for multiple major improvements in the functioning of Stanford hospital.

    Dr. Johnson views the practice of medicine largely as an educational endeavor. To that end, for many years he has taught medical students, residents, and fellows—including hosting them as temporary and longer-term apprentices in his oncology clinic and working with them on the inpatient housestaff oncology service. He emphasizes diversity and inclusion in his mentoring efforts and has worked tirelessly to promote the professional development of medical trainees across the training spectrum--from undergraduates to oncology fellows.

    The winner of multiple Stanford Medicine teaching awards, Dr. Johnson has established himself as a regional and increasingly as a national leader and innovator in the education of oncology fellows, including by developing novel teaching methods that have been presented across the country, including at national meetings. He also heads the Stanford oncology department’s curricular development and as part of that had developed a novel curricular approach that centers the needs and teaching abilities of oncology fellows. He also works as one of the principal faculty members of the Stanford Educators-4-CARE program.

    Dr. Johnson and his co-host, Henry Bair, became concerned about the loss of a shared sense of meaning in the medical profession and, together, have taught multiple classes in the Medical School and, in the spring of 2022, founded The Doctor's Art podcast. Over the remainder of 2022, this podcast became one of the five most listened-to medical podcasts in the nation, with a growing national and international listenership.

    Finally, Dr. Johnson is an author with a growing reputation for insightful analysis of the intersection of medicine, ethics, and spirituality. His writings has been featured by Religion News Service, the Salt Lake Tribune, BYU Studies, Dialogue, and The San Jose Mercury News, where he is a regular contributor.

  • Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Khaki is a medical oncologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In his clinical practice, he treats patients with all forms of genitourinary cancer, including kidney, bladder, prostate, and testicular. He also regularly attends on the inpatient oncology service at Stanford Hospital.
    With each patient, he is devoted to providing exceptional, humanistic care and has been recognized throughout his career for his humanism. As a medical student, he was named to the national Gold Humanism Honor Society and he received the Reza Gandjei Humanism Award as a medical resident at UCSF.

    His research interests include novel therapies for genitourinary cancers, with a focus on urothelial cancer outcomes. He also has studied health care utilization and costs for end-of-life care of cancer patients.

    Dr. Khaki has earned honors and recognition from the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Conquer Cancer Foundation, and other organizations.

    He has authored numerous articles on topics such as immunotherapy for urothelial cancer, management of cancer patients with COVID-19, and utilization of end-of-life care by cancer patients. In addition, he is an editor for HemOnc.org and theMednet, a physician-only online community where members share clinical questions and answers.

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Khan is a fellowship-trained cancer specialist with board certification in oncology and hematology. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology.

    Dr. Khan focuses on the treatment of head and neck cancers, advanced thyroid cancers, and neuroendocrine tumors. He recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Khan’s research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as ways to reduce toxicities that some patients may experience when receiving cancer treatment. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy for aggressive thyroid cancer.

    He has published numerous articles on his research discoveries in peer-reviewed journals such as the JAMA Oncology, Investigational New Drugs, and others. Topics include new drug treatments for small cell lung cancer and for cancers of the head and neck, racial and gender disparities in certain types of cancer, and management of the potentially toxic effects of cancer therapies.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee. NRG brings together internationally recognized groups (the first words in their names form the acronym “NRG”) to conduct cancer clinical research and share study results. The objective is to inform clinical decision making and healthcare policy worldwide.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees. ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) is part of one of the five groups of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) Program.

    He also is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Central IRB for Early Phase Clinical Trials.

    When not providing patient care or conducting research, Dr. Khan enjoys spending time with his family, hiking, and relaxing at the beach.

  • Youn H Kim, MD

    Youn H Kim, MD

    The Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr., Professor for Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in cutaneous lymphomas, especially, mycosis fungoides; studies of prognostic factors, long-term survival results, and effects of therapies. Collaborative research with Departments of Pathology and Oncology in basic mechanisms of cutaneous lymphomas. Clinical trials of new investigative therapies for various dermatologic conditions or clinical trials of known therapies for new indications.

  • Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI aim to understand cancer burden and improve treatment quality at the population level. I have a strong focus on genetic risk assessment and precision oncology. I lead epidemiologic studies of cancer risk factors, clinical trials of novel approaches to cancer risk reduction, and decision analyses of strategies to optimize cancer outcomes.

  • David Kurtz

    David Kurtz

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 04/30/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImplementation of noninvasive detection of malignancies in the clinic remains difficult due to both technical and clinical challenges. These include necessary improvements in sensitivity and specificity of biomarkers, as well as demonstration of clinical utility of these assays. My research focuses on technical development and implementation of assays to detect and track cancers in order to facilitate personalized disease management.