School of Medicine


Showing 41-56 of 56 Results

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses

  • Jake Scott

    Jake Scott

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Jake Scott is a board-certified infectious diseases specialist. He provides general infectious diseases care in the inpatient and outpatient settings and his special interests include COVID-19, coccidiomycosis, multidrug-resistant organisms, HIV, and HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis. He works with patients from diverse backgrounds to provide compassionate, high-quality care aligned with their needs.

    Dr. Scott was born and raised in the Bay Area and was inspired to pursue a career in medicine after working as an HIV test counselor in San Francisco. He studied literature and creative writing in college and values the narrative aspect of medicine and the importance of drawing out the story behind the diagnosis.

    One of Dr. Scott’s passions is teaching. He regularly works with Stanford residents and students and has lectured on various infectious disease-related topics, such as COVID-19, fever of unknown origin, and the dangers of antibiotic overuse, especially as it contributes to the rising threat of multidrug-resistant infections. He is also committed to expanding awareness of infectious diseases outside of the hospital and university through public presentations in the community and media interviews.
    He is the medical director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare in Pleasanton and is a member of the Infection Control Committee and the Stanford Vaccine Clinical Advisory Committee.

    In his spare time, Dr. Scott enjoys rock climbing, hiking, and spending time with his wife and two young children.

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 10/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group’s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • Ashley Styczynski

    Ashley Styczynski

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioAshley Styczynski, MD, MPH, is an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine and Global Health Faculty Fellow, and a Medical Officer in the International Infection and Control Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Styczynski's research interests are in infectious disease epidemiology, global health, emerging infections, and antimicrobial resistance. She holds an MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an MD from University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to coming to Stanford for her infectious disease fellowship, she spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer at the CDC. During her time as an EIS officer, Dr. Styczynski conducted outbreak investigations on Zika virus, vaccinia virus, and rabies. She is currently conducting research on antimicrobial resistance and interventions to reduce nosocomial infections within low-resource healthcare facilities.

  • Aruna Subramanian

    Aruna Subramanian

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research and scholarly interests have focused on tailoring antimicrobial prophylaxis in specific highly immunocompromised hosts depending on their specific infectious disease risks. I am interested in developing diagnostic algorithms and treatment protocols that will improve the quality of care in transplant and oncology patients.

    I also have an interest in training ID fellows in this very specialized area of patient care. To that end, we have started a new ICHS ID fellowship with a specialized curriculum and are developing supplemental educational materials to enhance this training, which can be implemented at other academic training centers.

  • Lucy Tompkins

    Lucy Tompkins

    Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetic and cellular basis of pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori. Molecular epidemiology, hospital epidemiology, quality improvement in healthcare associated infections.

  • Elena Vendrame

    Elena Vendrame

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on understanding the host-pathogen interactions. In particular I study the interaction between natural killer cells and HIV.

  • Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory of Mechanisms in Human Immunity and Disease Pathogenesis

    Antibodies are a critical component of host defense. While the importance of humoral immunity has been recognized for decades, substantial gaps in knowledge remain around how antibodies function, and how their function is regulated, in vivo. Our laboratory performs studies designed to fill in these gaps, with the goal of enabling new vaccine and therapeutic strategies to prevent human disease. My interest in this area culminated from training in medicine, RNA virus biology (PhD), and molecular antibody biology (postdoctoral training). The intersection of these topics, viral immunity and disease pathogenesis, is the focus of our work. The essential question driving our research is why a small subset of people develop severe or fatal disease during viral infection while most infections result in a subclinical or mild outcome, even in at-risk populations. Our hypothesis is that the antibody signaling pathways that are engaged during viral infection through Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs) are a key driver of these distinct outcomes. We are focused on several major unknowns to address this hypothesis: How are antibody effector functions regulated in vivo and does this change in disease? How do distinct signaling pathways engaged by IgG immune complex-FcγR interactions impact host cell genetic regulation and the ultimate inflammatory/immune response? What are the tissue-specific functions that antibodies engage? How does the heterogeneity in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of human antibodies contribute to heterogeneity in viral immunity?



    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Andrew Zolopa

    Andrew Zolopa

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zolopa’s research applies a variety of clinical epidemiologic methods in an effort to optimize antiretroviral therapy and understand the impact of drug resistance on response to ARV. Areas of focus include the clinical application of resistance testing in optimizing antiretroviral therapy, clinical cohorts, trials of antiretroviral therapies and population-based epidemiologic evaluation of HIV resistance and efficacy of ARV therapy. More recently studies focused on premature aging in HIV.