Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


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  • Jef Caers

    Jef Caers

    Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the exploration & exploitation of geological resources, from data acquisition to decision making under uncertainty and risk assessment.

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in the School of Humanities & Sciences, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research & Professor of Integrated Socio-Environmental Systems

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Clark Michael Campagna

    Clark Michael Campagna

    Student Services Officer, Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources

    BioClark Campagna serves as a Student Services Officer for the dual and joint MS students in Stanford's E-IPER program. Prior to joining Stanford, Clark served as a Program Assistant for two master-level programs at the University of San Francisco. As a student services professional, Clark enjoys hearing about students' goals and passions, and working with them to make the most of their time at Stanford. Clark holds a BA in Political Science from UC San Diego and both an MPA and MA in Higher Education Administration from the University of San Francisco. When not at work, Clark enjoys road cycling, running, cooking, and spending time with friends.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Rachel Ragnhild Carlson

    Rachel Ragnhild Carlson

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioRachel Carlson researches the spatial ecology of coral reefs and variables impacting coral response to anthropogenic stress. Her work aims to support evidence-based marine planning linking conservation and sustainable livelihoods under climate change. She applies geospatial technology like high-resolution remote sensing and field-based methods to understand patterns of reef resilience and implications for ocean governance.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Rachel worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she led mapping and outreach programs to protect drinking water and coastal ecosystems. She has also worked for numerous environmental initiatives in Senegal, Ireland, and the Northern Mariana Islands. Rachel graduated from Rice University in 2011 with a Master's in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Bachelor's in English, and from Trinity College, Dublin in 2013 with a Master's in International Politics. She is a Stanford Graduate Fellow in Science and Engineering and a 2018 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in Ecology.