Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor of Environmental Biology, Professor of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElizabeth Hadly and her lab probe how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of animals.

  • Johanna Hedlund

    Johanna Hedlund

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioJohanna Hedlund is a Wallenberg postdoctoral researcher focusing broadly on climate and sustainable development issues in the science and policy interface, mainly using advanced network methods. Her research interests include environmental policy, transnational climate risk, climate adaptation, international cooperation and network science. Her postdoctoral research focuses specifically on how climate-induced extreme events may affect the global distribution of risk via international food trade.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Johanna worked for the Stockholm Environment Institute, where she developed the Transnational Climate Impact Index as a quantification of countries’ exposure to the globalized effects of climate change impacts, and as a postdoctoral scholar for 4TU.Centre for Resilience Engineering at the University of Twente. She received her PhD in sustainable development from Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.

  • Stefanie Helmrich

    Stefanie Helmrich

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioStefanie is a postdoctoral scholar at the Doerr School of Sustainability at Stanford University. Her postdoctoral research focuses on developing tools to optimize application and monitoring of nature-based climate solutions. During her Ph.D. she worked on reactive transport models and watershed models to investigate inorganic contaminant cycling. She holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Systems from U.C. Merced and a M.Sc. in Water Management from Technical University of Dresden.

  • Andrew Hennig

    Andrew Hennig

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2016

    BioAntarctic ice sheet, both of which have exhibited significant mass loss over the past few decades. If the two ice sheets were to fully collapse, they could be responsible for up to 15m of global sea level rise (roughly equal parts from both). This sea level rise would not only pose serious problems for coastal settlements, but cause serious changes to ecosystems, and could profoundly alter the Earth’s ocean circulation.

    Current estimates of the mass balance for ice sheets are based primarily on satellite data. This data has become more accurate and more available than ever before, since the 1990s. While estimates can be provided by satellite data, satellites are limited by virtue of the fact that they can only evaluate the surface of the ice shelf. Recent research has shown that a significant amount of the mass loss from the West Antarctic ice sheet is happening underwater, along grounding lines, where deep waters, warmed by global warming, enter the area underneath the ice shelf, and melt the shelves from the bottom. This not only results in mass loss directly, but increases calving of glaciers into the ocean, further accelerating their loss. This melting, below the surface of the ice shelves, cannot be estimated by satellites.

    To get a better understanding of the impact of warmer deep waters on glacial retreat in Western Antarctica, we need to measure the melt more directly. Using highly precise measurements of salinity and isotopic composition of seawater in coastal regions of Western Antarctica, we can estimate the amount of glacial meltwater present in the oceanic adjacent to ice sheets. Gaining a greater understanding of the rates and locations of West Antarctic melting will be crucial to developing our understanding of future sea level rise, and other wider impacts.

  • Natalie Herbert

    Natalie Herbert

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    BioNATALIE HERBERT is a Research Scientist in the Department of Earth Systems Science at the Doerr School of Sustainability. Her research investigates decision-making in the face of environmental risk. She completed her Ph.D. in 2020 at the Annenberg School for Communication, where she researched health and science communication with a focus on communicating scientific uncertainty. Natalie was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

  • Natan Holtzman

    Natan Holtzman

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioNatan Holtzman is a fourth-year PhD student in the Earth System Science department working with Prof. Alexandra Konings. He uses remote sensing and modeling to study how water moves between the atmosphere, plants, and soil. Natan graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2016 with a B.S. with honors in Geological Sciences and minors in Mathematics and Biology.

  • Alexander Honeyman

    Alexander Honeyman

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioMy Ph.D. work in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines was concerned with the biogeochemistry and recovery of post-wildfire soils. I work at the intersections of data science, field work, laboratory experimentation, biogeochemistry, and microbial ecology. I was exposed to the issue of wildland fire through 10 years of experience as a volunteer firefighter / EMT in Boulder County, Colorado (fire / rescue / EMS). I love working on soils because they are a fascinating interface between basic and applied science with immediate relevance to sustainability. Recreationally, I enjoy cycling and rock climbing but anything outside is fantastic.