Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-10 of 23 Results

  • Seogi Kang

    Seogi Kang

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTo construct basis of groundwater sustainability plan in California, we develop an effective workflow that can map 3D hydrogeology of the subsurface by using airborne electromagnetic data that can cover large area fast.

  • Chi-Chang Kao

    Chi-Chang Kao

    Professor of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioChi-Chang Kao works on the development of experimental methods exploiting the unique properties of high-brightness storage rings and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL), and their applications to materials science. Currently, he is working on using X-ray scattering in combination with high magnetic fields to study high-temperature superconductors, inelastic X-ray scattering study of materials using XFEL, and X-ray study of materials for energy applications.

    Kao served as the fifth director of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from November 2012 to February 2023. Prior to that, he served at Brookhaven National Laboratory for nearly 25 years in a variety of positions, including five years as chairperson of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). He was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2006 and was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2010 for his many contributions to resonant elastic and inelastic X-ray scattering techniques and their application to materials physics, as well as for his leadership at the NSLS.

  • Zerina Kapetanovic

    Zerina Kapetanovic

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Geophysics

    BioZerina Kapetanovic is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University working in the area of low-power wireless communication, sensing, and Internet of Things (IoT) systems. Prior to starting at Stanford, Kapetanovic was a postdoctoral researcher at Microsoft Research in the Networking Research Group and Research for Industry Group.

    Kapetanovic's research has been recognized by the Yang Research Award, the Distinguished Dissertation Award from the University of Washington, and is a Terman Faculty Fellow. She also received the Microsoft Research Distinguished Dissertation Grant and was selected to attend the 2020 UC Berkeley Rising Stars in EECS Workshop. Kapetanovic completed her PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Washington in 2022.

  • Omer Karaduman

    Omer Karaduman

    Assistant Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and Center Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioPrior to coming to Stanford, Omer completed his Ph.D. in Economics at MIT in 2020, and got his bachelor's degree in Economics from Bilkent University in 2014.

    His research focuses on the transition of the energy sector towards a decarbonized and sustainable future. In his research, he utilizes large datasets by using game-theoretical modeling to have practical policy suggestions.

  • Hemamala Karunadasa

    Hemamala Karunadasa

    Associate Professor of Chemistry and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioProfessor Hema Karunadasa works with colleagues in materials science, earth science, and applied physics to drive the discovery of new materials with applications in clean energy. Using the tools of synthetic chemistry, her group designs materials that couple the structural tunability of organic molecules with the diverse electronic and optical properties of extended inorganic solids. This research targets materials such as sorbents for capturing environmental pollutants, phosphors for solid-state lighting, and absorbers for solar cells.

    Hemamala Karunadasa studied chemistry and materials science at Princeton University (A.B. with high honors 2003; Certificate in Materials Science and Engineering 2003), where her undergraduate thesis project with Professor Robert J. Cava examined geometric magnetic frustration in metal oxides. She moved from solid-state chemistry to solution-state chemistry for her doctoral studies in inorganic chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley (Ph.D. 2009) with Professor Jeffrey R. Long. Her thesis focused on heavy atom building units for magnetic molecules and molecular catalysts for generating hydrogen from water. She continued to study molecular electrocatalysts for water splitting during postdoctoral research with Berkeley Professors Christopher J. Chang and Jeffrey R. Long at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. She further explored molecular catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation as a postdoc at the California Institute of Technology with Professor Harry B. Gray. She joined the Stanford Chemistry Department faculty in September 2012. Her research explores solution-state routes to new solid-state materials.

    Professor Karunadasa’s lab at Stanford takes a molecular approach to extended solids. Lab members gain expertise in solution- and solid-state synthetic techniques and structure determination through powder- and single-crystal x-ray diffraction. Lab tools also include a host of spectroscopic and electrochemical probes, imaging methods, and film deposition techniques. Group members further characterize their materials under extreme environments and in operating devices to tune new materials for diverse applications in renewable energy.

    Please visit the lab website for more details and recent news.

  • Leonid Kazovsky

    Leonid Kazovsky

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Kazovsky and his research group are investigating green energy-efficient networks. The focus of their research is on access and in-building networks and on hybrid optical / wireless networks. Prof. Kazovsky's research group is also conducting research on next-generation Internet architectures and novel zero-energy photonic components.

  • Amanda Helen Kennard

    Amanda Helen Kennard

    Assistant Professor of Political Science and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioAmanda Kennard is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. She studies the politics of climate change and global governance, employing game theory and a range of quantitative methods. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Politics at Princeton University, an M.S. from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, and a B.A. from New York University.

  • Julie Kennedy

    Julie Kennedy

    Professor (Teaching) of Earth System Science, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    For the past 21 years I have been active in designing and running the school's interdisciplinary environmental science and policy undergraduate major, the Earth Systems Program. I have specific interest in interdisciplinary teaching and learning, and in the effective communication of complex interdisciplinary problem descriptions, analysis methods, and solutions to expert and non-expert audiences. I advise and work on research projects with undergraduate and master's level students whose interests include ecology, energy, land systems management, ocean science and policy, sustainability, environmental education, and science communication.

    Teaching
    I teach classes in interdisciplinary problem analysis and in critical reading and review of environmental literature. I also am one of a number of faculty who co-teach the Earth Systems gateway course, Introduction to Earth Systems.

    Professional Activities
    My professional activities center on undergraduate education. I have been active for decades on Stanford committees that examine standards and policies, the review of general education requirements, undergraduate advising programs, student mental health, and student diversity.