Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-10 of 17 Results

  • Hong Yang

    Hong Yang

    Ph.D. Student in Geological Sciences, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioHong Yang is currently a PhD student in Geological Science working with Wendy L. Mao. He joined Mao’s lab at Stanford University in 2018, after finishing his Master’s Degree at HPSTAR, Shanghai, where he was supervised by Jung-Fu Lin. His Master’s thesis focused on the experimental determination of iron isotopic fractionation behavior of lower mantle phases using the Synchrotron X-ray technique NRIXS. Before that, he was an undergraduate majoring in Geochemistry at the University of Science and Technology of China. There he performed the quality assessment of bottled drinking water and water from Lake Chao under Fang Huang’s supervision.

    Hong’s research interests include the chemical (especially isotopic) evolution of the Earth and other planetary bodies; structure and sound velocities of iron-alloys at high pressure; pressure-induced electronic, magnetic, elastic and structural transitions in materials; as well as high pressure photon science. His recent research was published on Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 506, 113-122 (2019), entitled “Iron isotopic fractionation in mineral phases from Earth’s lower mantle: Did terrestrial magma ocean crystallization fractionate iron isotopes?”.

  • Audrey Yau

    Audrey Yau

    Director, Stanford Energy Fellowships, Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioAs a Director in the Precourt Institute for Energy and the Sustainability Accelerator in the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability, Audrey is responsible for the overall strategic and operational leadership for the Stanford Energy Postdoctoral Fellowship, the Summer Undergraduate Program on Energy Research, and the Stanford Sustainability Accelerator Fellowship. In her role, Audrey develops educational experiences that connect academic learning with real world impact for undergraduates and postdoctoral scholars in Stanford's newest school.

  • David Zhen Yin

    David Zhen Yin

    Research Scientist

    BioDavid Zhen Yin is the co-founder and program director of Stanford Mineral-X to lead the research of sustainable critical minerals explorations for renewable energy transitions. He is also the principal scientist at Stanford Center for Earth Resources Forecasting and Co-PI of the Stanford-KoBold collaboration. He develops data-scientific approaches for prediction, uncertainty quantification, and decision-making in critical earth resources exploration and development.

    David developed broad experience working with complex projects involving academia and industry and broad knowledge of the fields. His research delivered several key technologies transferred as in-house technologies in Chevron, Equinor, and KoBold. In addition, his research developments have been implemented on various subjects, from Antarctica bed topography modeling, critical mineral explorations in Canada/China/US, and the North Sea and Gulf of Mexico projects.

    Before joining Stanford, David was a Research Associate at Edinburgh Time-Lapse Project in Scotland, leading a geophysical monitoring research project in collaboration with Equinor from 2016 to 2018. He was also a technology consultant at Equinor's Research Center in Bergen, Norway. Then, he was a Chevron CoRE Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford from 2018 to 2021.

    David received his Ph.D. in Geosciences from Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK, in 2016. His research interests include data science for geosciences, geological uncertainty quantification, and decision-making under uncertainty. He has authored one book and tens of articles in peer-reviewed journals and international conferences.

  • Leehi Yona

    Leehi Yona

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Autumn 2018
    Juris Doctor Student, Law

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLeehi studies greenhouse gas inventories and how governments and corporations use (or misuse) scientific knowledge in climate law and policy. She is particularly interested in how these actors account for their greenhouse gas emissions and in the gaps between scientifically measured and politically accounted-for emissions.