Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 41-60 of 184 Results

  • Christopher Francis

    Christopher Francis

    Professor of Earth System Science, of Oceans and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and metals in the environment; molecular geomicrobiology; marine microbiology; microbial diversity; meta-omics

  • Edgar Wiggin Francisco V

    Edgar Wiggin Francisco V

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2023

    BioI research how land use change affects species interactions, invasions, and biodiversity in tropical forests. I primarily work with reptiles and amphibians to investigate the following questions:
    How can we integrate habitat requirements for vulnerable and range-restricted species into the agroecological matrix?
    How do evolved ecological constraints mediate species’ vulnerability or resiliency to anthropogenic disturbances?
    How can land use change influence biological invasions?

    Currently, my research is part of a grander effort to understand the social and ecological consequences of expanding oil palm agriculture in Costa Rica. I am additionally interested in sustainable agriculture, food sovereignty, and the political ecology of agribusiness in Latin America.

  • Tadashi Fukami

    Tadashi Fukami

    Professor of Biology and of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEcological and evolutionary community assembly, with emphasis on understanding historical contingency in community structure, ecosystem functioning, biological invasion and ecological restoration, using experimental, theoretical, and comparative methods involving bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals.

  • Anchal Garg

    Anchal Garg

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioShe is an environmental researcher working on the negative implications of air pollution on human health and climate change. She has worked on monitoring, mapping, emission inventory, and identifying health hazards of Volatile Organic Compounds, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Particulate Matter present in the air. Anchal conducted extensive fieldwork, surveys, and cross-sectional studies to identify air quality and health-related data. Her current project is modeling and measuring the health consequences of indoor air pollutants formed during the combustion of stove gas in California.

  • Anna Gomes

    Anna Gomes

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2020

    BioMy main interests lie within anthropogenic climate change, environmental science, and agriculture. The complex system dynamics and interconnections between agriculture and the environment including nutrient cycling, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions are a few of the most critical challenges for today's soil scientists. After completing a master’s degree in Sustainability Science and Environmental Studies at Lund University in Sweden, researching farmer adoption of practices which mitigate GHGs from arable soils in the Netherlands at Wageningen University, I started a PhD in Earth System Science at Stanford University, aiming to focus on soil and environmental biogeochemistry. In parallel to my work in academia, I have been working on a start-up to address food waste and food insecurity in CA (Ugly Food Market), in addition to being a team member on several projects including a sharing library (Circle Centre), a soil science educational platform (Soil Life), and other sustainability related initiatives.

  • Emily Gordon

    Emily Gordon

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioPhD, Colorado State University, 2023
    MSc, University of Otago, 2020
    BSc, University of Otago, 2018

  • Steven Gorelick

    Steven Gorelick

    Cyrus Fisher Tolman Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests. Research : .

    As a hydrogeologist and hydrologist, my research involves the study of water resources and water security with emphasis on freshwater. Using lab and field data, our aim is to develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of the transport of water and contaminants, and to investigate regional water resources systems. We have developed simulation-based planning tools to aid in sustainable agricultural and urban water management in the US, Mexico, India, and Jordan. With my colleagues, we have initiated the Global Freshwater Initiative, which studies water resources vulnerability problems throughout the world. During the past 15 years, our field investigations have focused on the interactions between groundwater and patterns of vegetation in studies of both meadow and salt-marsh ecohydrology. Scales of physical processes of interest extend from the domain of small pores to vast regional subsurface flow environments. Although driven by observations and data, we develop conceptual and quantitative models to rigorously understand physical processes, make predictions, and explore the impacts of new water management policies, such as taxes, quota, and markets. Such models enhance our understanding of groundwater flow behavior and provide the means to better manage water resources. .




    . - Teaching :

    . I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students involving principles and methods used in physical and contaminant hydrogeology. In addition, I run a seminar series that exposes students to a variety of multidisciplinary topics involving hydrology. .





    : - Professional Activities :


    . 2021-2022 von Humboldt Fellow-Germany, 2022-23 Fulbright Fellow - Distinguished Chair in Science, Technology and Innovation, Australian-American Program, 2016 Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2014 Best Paper in Environmental Research Letters in 2014 (Padowski and Gorelick, (2014), 2013 Editor's Choice Award, Water Resources Research for paper Srinivasan et al., (2012), Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012), International Fellow, Institute for Environmental Science and Research (ESR) (2011), New Zealand, Fulbright Senior Scholar (2008-09); Chester C. Keisel Memorial Lecturer, University of Arizona (2008); Best Paper Award in Computers and Geosciences, International Association for Mathematical Geology (2006); fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005); Stanford representative to the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005-2008); M. King Hubbert Science Award, NGWA (2004); Ineson Distinguished Lecturer (1998); Fulbright Senior Scholar (1997); O.E. Meinzer Award, GSA (1994) James B. Macelwane medal, AGU (1990); Fellow, GSA (1988) and AGU (1990); Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1990-present); visiting professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory (2006); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, jointly at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (2005); visiting scholar, University of Cambridge, Zoology (2007); visiting scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (2009); Member AGU Water and Society Technical Committee (2011-present) visiting professor, University of Western Australia Centre for Ecohydrology (2012); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (2013, 2019)

  • Brian Green

    Brian Green

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research is on the dynamics and circulation of the stratosphere, focusing on quantifying the sources and effects of gravity waves. More broadly, I'm interested in and curious about a large range of topics relating to tropical climate, clouds, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and ocean.

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor of Environmental Biology, Professor of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElizabeth Hadly and her lab probe how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of animals.

  • Johanna Hedlund

    Johanna Hedlund

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioJohanna Hedlund is a Wallenberg postdoctoral researcher focusing broadly on climate and sustainable development issues in the science and policy interface, mainly using advanced network methods. Her research interests include environmental policy, transnational climate risk, climate adaptation, international cooperation and network science. Her postdoctoral research focuses specifically on how climate-induced extreme events may affect the global distribution of risk via international food trade.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Johanna worked for the Stockholm Environment Institute, where she developed the Transnational Climate Impact Index as a quantification of countries’ exposure to the globalized effects of climate change impacts, and as a postdoctoral scholar for 4TU.Centre for Resilience Engineering at the University of Twente. She received her PhD in sustainable development from Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.

  • Stefanie Helmrich

    Stefanie Helmrich

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioStefanie is a postdoctoral scholar at the Doerr School of Sustainability at Stanford University. Her postdoctoral research focuses on developing tools to optimize application and monitoring of nature-based climate solutions. During her Ph.D. she worked on reactive transport models and watershed models to investigate inorganic contaminant cycling. She holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Systems from U.C. Merced and a M.Sc. in Water Management from Technical University of Dresden.

  • Andrew Hennig

    Andrew Hennig

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2016

    BioAntarctic ice sheet, both of which have exhibited significant mass loss over the past few decades. If the two ice sheets were to fully collapse, they could be responsible for up to 15m of global sea level rise (roughly equal parts from both). This sea level rise would not only pose serious problems for coastal settlements, but cause serious changes to ecosystems, and could profoundly alter the Earth’s ocean circulation.

    Current estimates of the mass balance for ice sheets are based primarily on satellite data. This data has become more accurate and more available than ever before, since the 1990s. While estimates can be provided by satellite data, satellites are limited by virtue of the fact that they can only evaluate the surface of the ice shelf. Recent research has shown that a significant amount of the mass loss from the West Antarctic ice sheet is happening underwater, along grounding lines, where deep waters, warmed by global warming, enter the area underneath the ice shelf, and melt the shelves from the bottom. This not only results in mass loss directly, but increases calving of glaciers into the ocean, further accelerating their loss. This melting, below the surface of the ice shelves, cannot be estimated by satellites.

    To get a better understanding of the impact of warmer deep waters on glacial retreat in Western Antarctica, we need to measure the melt more directly. Using highly precise measurements of salinity and isotopic composition of seawater in coastal regions of Western Antarctica, we can estimate the amount of glacial meltwater present in the oceanic adjacent to ice sheets. Gaining a greater understanding of the rates and locations of West Antarctic melting will be crucial to developing our understanding of future sea level rise, and other wider impacts.

  • Natalie Herbert

    Natalie Herbert

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    BioNATALIE HERBERT is a Research Scientist in the Department of Earth Systems Science at the Doerr School of Sustainability. Her research investigates decision-making in the face of environmental risk. She completed her Ph.D. in 2020 at the Annenberg School for Communication, where she researched health and science communication with a focus on communicating scientific uncertainty. Natalie was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.