Vice Provost and Dean of Research


Showing 1-10 of 39 Results

  • Mehran Sahami

    Mehran Sahami

    James and Ellenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioMehran Sahami is the James and Ellenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor (Teaching) and Associate Chair for Education in the Computer Science department at Stanford University. He is also the Robert and Ruth Halperin University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was a Senior Research Scientist at Google. His research interests include computer science education, artificial intelligence, and ethics. He served as co-chair of the ACM/IEEE-CS joint task force on Computer Science Curricula 2013, which created curricular guidelines for college programs in Computer Science at an international level. He has also served as chair of the ACM Education Board, an elected member of the ACM Council, and was appointed by California Governor Jerry Brown to the state's Computer Science Strategic Implementation Plan Advisory Panel.

  • Silvio Savarese

    Silvio Savarese

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioSilvio Savarese is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University and the inaugural Mindtree Faculty Scholar. He earned his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 2005 and was a Beckman Institute Fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2005–2008. He joined Stanford in 2013 after being Assistant and then Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, from 2008 to 2013. From 2016 to 2018, he served as a director of the SAIL-Toyota Center for AI Research at Stanford. In 2017 he co-founded an AI-to-business start up where he built and directed as Chief Scientist a large R&D team until 2020.

    Dr Savarese addresses theoretical foundations and practical applications of computational vision and robotic perception. His research focuses on developing algorithms for enabling autonomous and embodied systems to understand and interact with the environment. Contributions include: i) investigation of methods for interpreting complex situations and behaviors from sensory streams; ii) development of computational models for capturing social norms and common sense rules allowing agents to effectively predict and respond to the environment; iii) exploration of machine vision methodologies for enabling automatic performance analysis and sustainability assessment in construction engineering.

    Dr Savarese has published more than 200 scientific articles in top-tier journals and conferences, including IJCV, IEEE-PAMI, CVPR, ICCV, NIPS, ECCV, ICRA, IROS, and RSS. He was program chair of the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) in 2020, general chair of the 4th International Conference on 3D Vision (3DV) in 2016, area chair of CVPR 2010, ICCV 2011, CVPR 2013, ECCV 2014, CVPR 2015, ICCV 2015, ECCV 2016, ICCV 2017, and an Associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (PAMI), from 2016-2019.

    Dr. Savarese has been recipient of several awards including a Best Paper Award at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) in 2019, a Best Paper Award at the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) in 2018, a Best Student Paper Award at CVPR 2016, the James R. Croes Medal in 2013, a TRW Automotive Endowed Research Award in 2012, an NSF Career Award in 2011 and Google Research Award in 2020 and 2010. In 2002 he was awarded the Walker von Brimer Award for outstanding research initiative. He has been a keynote speaker at various academic conferences and his work has been featured in a variety of media outlets, magazines and domestic and international newspapers including The New York Times, CBS, PBS, Financial Times, Quartz, ABC, BBC, Corriere Della Sera and La Repubblica.

  • Londa Schiebinger

    Londa Schiebinger

    John L. Hinds Professor of the History of Science

    BioLonda Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science in the History Department at Stanford University and Director of the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment Project. From 2004-2010, Schiebinger served as the Director of Stanford's Clayman Institute for Gender Research. She is a leading international authority on gender and science. Over the past thirty years, Schiebinger's work has been devoted to teasing apart three analytically distinct but interlocking pieces of the gender and science puzzle: the history of women's participation in science; gender in the structure of scientific institutions; and the gendering of human knowledge.She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.