Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-10 of 25 Results

  • Kim Beil

    Kim Beil

    ITALIC Associate Director

    BioDr. Beil is a scholar of visual culture, with an emphasis on the history of photography. Her book, Good Pictures: A History of Popular Photography, looks at 50 stylistic trends in the medium since the 19th century. In prior research, she has focused on the relationship between color photography and modern architecture, and on the use of blur to represent speed and individuality in automotive advertising. She writes frequently about contemporary art and publishes in Artforum, Art in America, X-TRA: Contemporary Art Quarterly, as well as scholarly publications including Afterimage, Museums and Social Issues, and Visual Resources.

  • Collin Closek

    Collin Closek

    Thinking Matters (or TM) Lecturer

    BioI am a Staff Scientist at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and a Teaching Fellow in the Thinking Matters Program in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. My research focuses on optimizing molecular and computational tools to address ecological and evolutionary questions. I have published in the areas of environmental change, ocean health, biodiversity, disease, eDNA, -omics, and aquaculture. I hold a B.S. in Biology from the University of Georgia, began my doctoral studies at the University of California, Merced, and earned my Ph.D. at Penn State. I completed two postdoctoral appointments, first as a joint-postdoctoral researcher at University of Washington's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and University of Maryland's Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology. Second, I completed advanced collaborative training as a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University’s Woods Institute for the Environment in conjunction with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. I enjoy exploring and teaching about the natural world, its diversity, complexities, and the challenges faced by our environment.

  • Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Thinking Matters Lecturer

    BioChloe Summers Edmondson is a Lecturer in the Thinking Matters program. She received her PhD from Stanford in the French & Italian Department in 2020. Her research is situated at the crossroads of literary criticism, cultural history, and media studies. She specializes in 17th and 18th-century France, with a particular focus on letter-writing practices. She has also worked extensively in the field of Digital Humanities. Chloe was co-project lead on the "Salons Project" with Melanie Conroy, a project under the umbrella of "Mapping the Republic of Letters." She completed the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities offered through CESTA, the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Modern History, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and in the series Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. Most recently she co-edited a volume with Dan Edelstein, entitled Networks of Enlightenment: Digital Approaches to the Republic of Letters, with Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. She holds a BA with Honors in French and a MA in Communication, also from Stanford.

    During the 2020-2021 academic year, she is teaching "Stories Everywhere," "Design that Understands Us," and "Reading the Body."

  • Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    SLE Lecturer

    BioNura Hossainzadeh is a Lecturer in the Structured Liberal Education program and a political theorist by training. Her interest in political theory began when she was an undergraduate at Harvard, where she studied the canon of political theory—which begins in ancient Greece and ends in contemporary Europe and the U.S. After college, Nura moved to Qom, Iran, enrolling in an all-female Islamic seminary, Jami’at Al-Zahra, and taking courses in Islamic political thought and the Iranian revolution. She continued her study of both Western and Islamic political thought at UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in political science in 2016, writing her dissertation on a figure who not only wrote political theory but led an Islamic government—Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

    Nura’s current book project is entitled Islamic Republican: Ruhollah Khomeini’s Political Thought. Khomeini's thought became a primary resource for the writing of Iran’s Islamic constitution and continues to influence politics in contemporary Iran. Nura’s book examines all of Khomeini’s political works in the original Persian: his yet-untranslated book, published in 1943, The Unveiling of Secrets; his more widely read 1970 seminary lectures (later compiled into a book form), Islamic Government; and his post-revolutionary statements, speeches, and correspondence, contained in 11 volumes. The book concludes by investigating how contemporary Islamic thinkers engage Khomeini’s legacy and deploy it to justify or criticize democratic elements in Islamic governance.

    While pursuing research on Khomeini, Nura has taught a variety of courses on topics as diverse as American politics and government, feminist thought, canonical and non-Western political theory, Iranian and Middle East politics, and legal theory.

  • Alison Grace Laurence

    Alison Grace Laurence

    Thinking Matters (or TM) Lecturer

    BioAlison Laurence is a Lecturer in the Thinking Matters program. She received her PhD from MIT’s interdisciplinary program in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS) in 2019. A cultural and environmental historian, she specializes in the study of nature on display. Her current book manuscript--Of Dinosaurs and Culture Wars: Extinction, Extraction, and Modern American Monsters--traces how popular displays transformed dinosaurs and other creatures of deep time from scientific specimens to consumer objects and artifacts of everyday American life. Alison’s work has appeared in the Science Museum Group Journal, the History of Anthropology Newsletter, and the Anthropocene Curriculum. She holds a BA in Classics from Brown University and an MA in History and Public History from the University of New Orleans.

    During the 20120-21 academic year, she is teaching "Stories Everywhere" and "100,000 Years of War."