Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-10 of 39 Results

  • David Armenta

    David Armenta

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDavid Armenta is a lecturer for the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) program. He earned his bachelor's degree in molecular and cellular biology from Harvard University. Working as an undergraduate intern in the lab of Andrew Murray, he studied mechanisms underlying evolution and adaptation in budding yeast. Next, he earned his PhD in biology (cells, molecules, and organisms track) from Stanford University, working with Scott Dixon to study how amino acid metabolism regulates sensitivity of cancer cells to the nonapoptotic cell death mechanism of ferroptosis.

  • Kim Beil

    Kim Beil

    ITALIC Associate Director

    BioKim Beil is an art historian who specializes in the history of photography. Her book, Good Pictures: A History of Popular Photography, looks at 50 stylistic trends in the medium since the 19th century. Recently she’s written about photography and climate change for The Atlantic, a survey of street views for Cabinet, and a history of screenshots for the Believer. She also writes frequently about modern and contemporary art for Artforum, Art in America, BOMB, Photograph, and Sculpture magazines.

  • Nate Grubman

    Nate Grubman

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioNate Grubman is a Teaching Fellow in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). He was previously a postdoctoral scholar at the Freeman-Spogli Institute's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Prior to coming to Stanford, he earned a PhD in political science at Yale University, an MS in Applied Economics at Johns Hopkins University, and a BA in International Relations at Tufts University. He has taught courses focusing on democracy, contemporary problems of civic engagement, international development, and macroeconomics.

    Nate is currently working on a book entitled Skipping Class: Tunisia's Party System After the Revolution. The book uses archival material, elite interviews, an original survey, and analysis of campaign materials to understand why the party system formed after Tunisia's 2010--11 uprising failed to offer appealing economic policy choices to voters. More broadly, the book considers the role of political parties and their policy promises during transitions from authoritarian rule. His other research focuses on corruption and political nostalgia. His research has been published by the Journal of Democracy, the Middle East Research and Information Project, the Project on Middle East Democracy, and the Washington Post Monkey Cage.

    Nate first went to North Africa in 2007, when he studied abroad in Cairo and briefly lived on a boat. After graduating from college, he spent two years teaching middle school English and high school history in Cairo. He was surprised and inspired by the popular uprising that took place in Egypt in 2011 and has dedicated the time ever since to studying the many difficulties experienced during political transitions. In addition to his time in Egypt, he has studied in Morocco and conducted extensive research in Tunisia.

  • Katelyn Hettie McKown

    Katelyn Hettie McKown

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioKatelyn is a Lecturer in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) program. She earned a B.S. in Biology at Stanford and completed an honors thesis on her research in the Fire Lab using the nematode C. elegans to examine metal toxicity in the presence of the chelator, glyphosate. She went on to earn a Ph.D. in Genetics from the Stanford School of Medicine, studying stomatal development in the temperate grass model and smaller relative to wheat, Brachypodium distachyon, in the Bergmann Lab. Stomata are pores on the surfaces of leaves that regulate gas and water exchange. They are essential in managing the plant’s nutrient circulation, temperature, and water use efficiency, and therefore have important implications for drought tolerance. Katelyn’s research focused on characterizing members of a well-conserved transcription factor family involved in stomatal differentiation using genetic approaches to understand how grasses’ unique stomata are formed, including the creation of cross-species rescues to test for functional conservation across monocots and dicots.

    Katelyn is also passionate about science communication and teaching, and has organized science outreach events through outlets such as Stanford’s Splash, Taste of Science, and Nightlife at the Cal Academy; tutored at the Hume Writing Center and for the Biology honors thesis writing class; and served as an Indigenous research mentor for first year Native students in Frosh Fellows. When she’s not in the lab or classroom, Katelyn can be found gardening, fishing, playing board games, or exploring the great outdoors.

  • Melissa A. Hosek

    Melissa A. Hosek

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioMelissa A. Hosek earned her Ph.D. in Chinese from the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. She specializes in modern Chinese literature with interests in environmental humanities, STS (science, technology, and society), and the digital humanities. Her dissertation, "The Ecological Imagination: Nature, Technology, and Criticism in Chinese Science Fiction: 1976-Today," examines how modern Chinese eco-perspectives are informed by and condition ideas about science and technology. She analyzes a wide range of notable science fiction films, novels, and short stories to argue that ideas about ecology are deeply entangled with ideas about scientific progress, but can also serve as a vehicle for critiquing scientific development.

    Melissa is also interested in higher education pedagogy and Chinese language teaching and learning. She earned certificates in Language Program Management and ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interviewing from Stanford's Language Center. She has taught classes in Mandarin Chinese, film studies, Chinese literature, and East Asian Studies. In the field of digital humanities, she has developed several projects and received the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities from Stanford's Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her other research interests include materialism, science fiction studies, critical theory, and nationalism.