Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 51-65 of 65 Results

  • Parna Sengupta

    Parna Sengupta

    Director and Associate Vice Provost, Stanford Introductory Studies, Stanford Introductory Studies Operations

    BioParna Sengupta is Associate Vice Provost and Director of Stanford Introductory Studies (SIS), under the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (VPUE).SIS curricular programs include: Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) first-year requirement; The ESF (Education as Self-fashioning) program for first-year students; SLE and ITALIC, residential program for first-year students; the Introductory Seminars program offers 230+ seminars for first- and second-year students each year; Sophomore College and Arts Intensive which offer intensive seminar courses each year for returning sophomores during the first three weeks of September.

    Parna arrived at Stanford in 2008 from Carleton College, where she was an associate professor in South Asian history. Parna’s book, Pedagogy for Religion: Missionary Education and the Fashioning of Hindus and Muslims in Bengal (UC Press, 2011), reveals the centrality of missionary models of schooling on the development of modern education, an influence that resulted in the reinforcement of religion and religious identity in colonial India. Her most recent project is on the early twentieth century feminist thinker Rokeya Hossain.

  • Nestor Silva

    Nestor Silva

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study the environmental politics of hydrocarbon extraction sites in the Americas. These sites are inherently uncertain, both socially and ecologically. My research analyzes how science and politics are applied to these uncertainties. I argue that extraction-site politics demonstrate that colonial ideals still inspire responses to fossil fuels and a number of other modern uncertainties.

  • Lara Tohme

    Lara Tohme

    Associate Director of Introductory Seminars, Stanford Introductory Studies Operations

    Current Role at StanfordAssociate Director of Introductory Seminars

  • John Turman

    John Turman

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioJohn Turman is a lecturer for the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) program. He earned his bachelor's degree in philosophy at U.C. Berkeley and completed his PhD in philosophy at Stanford University. John's current research is focused on foundational questions about the concept of knowledge, concepts of action, concepts of the mind, and how facts about a person's mind explain facts about their behavior. John is also a passionate (beginner) video game development hobbyist and a long-time music/audio production hobbyist (and has a few other irons in the fire).

  • Cynthia Laura Vialle-Giancotti

    Cynthia Laura Vialle-Giancotti

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioCynthia is a Lecturer for the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education Program in Undergraduate Education.

    Her research encompasses 17th and 18th century French literary forms, with a focus on novels, literary portraits, gendered and ageist representations.

    Her dissertation titled: "Framing Portraits in 18th-Century French Novels" focuses on the portrayal of the body in French fiction of the 17th and 18th centuries. Its principal aim is to show the import of 17th century female authors in shaping 18th century descriptive practices. It also reveals the functions that descriptions of the body serve in the 18th century: instructing and guiding the reader, as well as entertaining her. Lastly, it underlines how descriptive practices offered a medium for female authors to assert their cultural primacy, against male narrative traditions.

    Teaching is my greatest passion. At Stanford I have taught and TA'd classes on various subjects (French language, European History, Italian literature, German Culture, English Gothic Novels, Autobiographies and History of Revolutions) using innovative methods and assignments. My whole teaching approach is oriented toward one goal: to make students perceive the real-life impact of literary studies in particular and the humanities more in general. I am committed to rendering the study of the humanities and the apprenticeship of languages accessible to our diverse community. Having been a FLI (First Generation College) student I understand the difficulties that students from this community encounter and I am happy to support them in their learning needs.

    Research Interests: the novel and novel theory, gender studies, life-writing genres, the body and issues of corporality (death, sickness, aging), supernatural genres, violence against women, history and art history.

  • Daniela R. P. Weiner

    Daniela R. P. Weiner

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDaniela R. P. Weiner is a COLLEGE Lecturer in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education program.

    Before joining the COLLEGE program, she was a Jim Joseph Postdoctoral Fellow in the Concentration in Education & Jewish Studies in the Stanford Graduate School of Education (2020-2022). She is a historian of modern European history (with a focus on Germany and Italy), modern Jewish history, and the Holocaust. Her book, Teaching a Dark Chapter: History Books and the Holocaust in Italy and the Germanys, is forthcoming with Cornell University Press (2024) and explores how the post-fascist countries of East Germany, West Germany, and Italy taught the Second World War and the Holocaust in their educational systems. The book specifically explores the representations of these events in textbooks. A new project focuses on the history of baptism and conversion during the Holocaust and draws on the newly opened Vatican and Jesuit archives from the period of the Second World War.

    Her research has been published in Journal of Modern Jewish Studies, Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society, and Journal of Contemporary History. She has received fellowships/grants from: the Fulbright U.S. Student Program (Germany, AY 2018- 2019); the Leibniz Institute for Educational Media | Georg Eckert Institute; the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.; the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

    She teaches courses in interdisciplinary liberal education, modern European history, and Holocaust Studies. In AY 2024-2025, she will teach the courses "Citizenship in the 21st Century" and "Stanford Confronts the 'Fascist Moment'."

  • Shannon Winters

    Shannon Winters

    Director of Finance and Administration, Stanford Introductory Studies Operations

    Current Role at StanfordDirector of Finance and Administration, Stanford Introductory Studies

  • Irmak Yazici

    Irmak Yazici

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioIrmak Yazici is a Lecturer and Fellow in the Civic, Liberal, Global Education (COLLEGE) Program at Stanford University. Irmak is a political scientist by training and her research broadly focuses on secularism and religion in global and comparative politics. She's particularly interested in how secular law and policies regulate the public sphere in democracies and the cases in which such regulation can foster religious nationalist ideologies. Irmak is currently working on a book project that details this complex overlap between secularism, democracy, and religious nationalism.

    Prior to her appointment at Stanford, Irmak was a Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She designed and taught a broad range of courses, including courses on religion and constitutional law in the United States, the politics of the media, environmental law and politics, American politics, global/comparative politics, and political inquiry/analysis.

    Irmak is a Fulbright alumna (2012–2014) and her research received funding from the American Political Science Association (APSA), International Studies Association (ISA), and Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution.

  • John Young

    John Young

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioJohn Young is a lecturer in Civic, Liberal and Global Education (COLLEGE). John completed his Bachelor's at Dartmouth College before earning his M.S. and PhD in Political Science at Stanford University.

    John’s research focuses on the built environment, and brings together scholarship from political theory, geography, economics, and psychology. Three big questions orient his work. How does the built environment affect the people who live in and move through it? How do laws, economics, and technology produce the built environment we have? Finally, do people have normative and political entitlements to physical space, and if so, what are they and how can they be secured in public space, private space, and with land-use policy?

    John also works in the construction trades, building, repairing, and upgrading residential structures. He specializes in sustainable building and energy efficiency. John finds it deeply rewarding to help people enjoy their home and get more practical use from it, putting theory and practice together to create built environments conducive to human flourishing.