Bio


Byron Reeves, PhD, is the Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication at Stanford and
Professor (by courtesy) in the Stanford School of Education. Byron has a long history of
experimental research on the psychological processing of media, and resulting responses and
effects. He has studied how media influence attention, memory and emotional responses and has
applied the research in the areas of speech dialogue systems, interactive games, advanced
displays, social robots, and autonomous cars. Byron has recently launched (with Stanford
colleagues Nilam Ram and Thomas Robinson) the Human Screenome Project (Nature, 2020),
designed to collect moment-by-moment changes in technology use across applications, platforms
and screens.

At Stanford, Byron has been Director of the Center for the Study of Language and Information,
and Co-Director of the H-STAR Institute (Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced
Research), and he was the founding Director of mediaX at Stanford, a university-industry
program launched in 2001 to facilitate discussion and research at the intersection of academic
and applied interests. Byron has worked at Microsoft Research and with several technology
startups, and has been involved with media policy at the FTC, FCC, US Congress and White
House. He is an elected Fellow of the International Communication Association, and recipient of ICA Fellows book award for The Media Equation (with Prof. Clifford Nass), and the Novim Foundation Epiphany Science and Society Award. Byron’s PhD in Communication is from Michigan State University.

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Maier Faculty Development Award, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1984)
  • Paul C. Edwards Professorship, Stanford University (1992)
  • Fellow, International Communication Association (1997)
  • Outstanding Alumni Award, Michigan State University (2001)
  • Nelson Award, Distinguished Service to Mass Communication Education (2008)

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Michigan State University, Communication (1976)
  • M.A., Michigan State University, Communication (1974)
  • B.F.A., Southern Methodist University, Journalism and Graphic Design (1972)

Research Interests


  • Social and Emotional Learning
  • Technology and Education

2022-23 Courses


Stanford Advisees


All Publications


  • The psychology of poverty and life online: natural experiments on the effects of smartphone payday loan ads on psychological stress INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY Lee, J., Hamilton, J. T., Ram, N., Roehrick, K., Reeves, B. 2022
  • Stimulus Sampling With 360-Videos: Examining Head Movements, Arousal, Presence, Simulator Sickness, and Preference on a Large Sample of Participants and Videos IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AFFECTIVE COMPUTING Jun, H., Miller, M., Herrera, F., Reeves, B., Bailenson, J. N. 2022; 13 (3): 1416-1425
  • Connectedness and independence of young adults and parents in the digital world: Observing smartphone interactions at multiple timescales using Screenomics JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS Sun, X., Ram, N., Reeves, B., Cho, M., Fitzgerald, A., Robinson, T. N. 2022
  • Selectively localized: Temporal and visual structure of smartphone screen activity across media environments MOBILE MEDIA & COMMUNICATION Muise, D., Lu, Y., Pan, J., Reeves, B. 2022
  • Screenertia: Understanding "Stickiness" of Media Through Temporal Changes in Screen Use COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Brinberg, M., Ram, N., Wang, J., Sundar, S., Cummings, J. J., Yeykelis, L., Reeves, B. 2022
  • Screenomics: A Framework to Capture and Analyze Personal Life Experiences and the Ways that Technology Shapes Them. Human-computer interaction Reeves, B., Ram, N., Robinson, T. N., Cummings, J. J., Giles, C. L., Pan, J., Chiatti, A., Cho, M. J., Roehrick, K., Yang, X., Gagneja, A., Brinberg, M., Muise, D., Lu, Y., Luo, M., Fitzgerald, A., Yeykelis, L. 2021; 36 (2): 150-201

    Abstract

    Digital experiences capture an increasingly large part of life, making them a preferred, if not required, method to describe and theorize about human behavior. Digital media also shape behavior by enabling people to switch between different content easily, and create unique threads of experiences that pass quickly through numerous information categories. Current methods of recording digital experiences provide only partial reconstructions of digital lives that weave - often within seconds - among multiple applications, locations, functions and media. We describe an end-to-end system for capturing and analyzing the "screenome" of life in media, i.e., the record of individual experiences represented as a sequence of screens that people view and interact with over time. The system includes software that collects screenshots, extracts text and images, and allows searching of a screenshot database. We discuss how the system can be used to elaborate current theories about psychological processing of technology, and suggest new theoretical questions that are enabled by multiple time scale analyses. Capabilities of the system are highlighted with eight research examples that analyze screens from adults who have generated data within the system. We end with a discussion of future uses, limitations, theory and privacy.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/07370024.2019.1578652

    View details for PubMedID 33867652

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8045984

  • The Idiosyncrasies of Everyday Digital Lives: Using the Human Screenome Project to Study User Behavior on Smartphones. Computers in human behavior Brinberg, M. n., Ram, N. n., Yang, X. n., Cho, M. J., Sundar, S. S., Robinson, T. N., Reeves, B. n. 2021; 114

    Abstract

    Most methods used to make theory-relevant observations of technology use rely on self-report or application logging data where individuals' digital experiences are purposively summarized into aggregates meant to describe how the average individual engages with broadly defined segments of content. This aggregation and averaging masks heterogeneity in how and when individuals actually engage with their technology. In this study, we use screenshots (N > 6 million) collected every five seconds that were sequenced and processed using text and image extraction tools into content-, context-, and temporally-informative "screenomes" from 132 smartphone users over several weeks to examine individuals' digital experiences. Analyses of screenomes highlight extreme between-person and within-person heterogeneity in how individuals switch among and titrate their engagement with different content. Our simple quantifications of textual and graphical content and flow throughout the day illustrate the value screenomes have for the study of individuals' smartphone use and the cognitive and psychological processes that drive use. We demonstrate how temporal, textual, graphical, and topical features of people's smartphone screens can lay the foundation for expanding the Human Screenome Project with full-scale mining that will inform researchers' knowledge of digital life.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.chb.2020.106570

    View details for PubMedID 33041494

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7543997

  • Rollman and Brent: Phonotype. Journal of general internal medicine Robinson, T. N., Reeves, B., Ram, N. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11606-020-05798-y

    View details for PubMedID 32221856

  • Time for the Human Screenome Project NATURE Reeves, B., Robinson, T., Ram, N. 2020; 577 (7790): 314–17

    View details for Web of Science ID 000509570100014

    View details for PubMedID 31942062

  • Screenomics: A New Approach for Observing and Studying Individuals' Digital Lives. Journal of adolescent research Ram, N., Yang, X., Cho, M. J., Brinberg, M., Muirhead, F., Reeves, B., Robinson, T. N. 2020; 35 (1): 16-50

    Abstract

    This study describes when and how adolescents engage with their fast-moving and dynamic digital environment as they go about their daily lives. We illustrate a new approach - screenomics - for capturing, visualizing, and analyzing screenomes, the record of individuals' day-to-day digital experiences.Over 500,000 smartphone screenshots provided by four Latino/Hispanic youth, age 14-15 years, from low-income, racial/ethnic minority neighborhoods.Screenomes collected from smartphones for one to three months, as sequences of smartphone screenshots obtained every five seconds that the device is activated, are analyzed using computational machinery for processing images and text, machine learning algorithms, human-labeling, and qualitative inquiry.Adolescents' digital lives differ substantially across persons, days, hours, and minutes. Screenomes highlight the extent of switching among multiple applications, and how each adolescent is exposed to different content at different times for different durations - with apps, food-related content, and sentiment as illustrative examples.We propose that the screenome provides the fine granularity of data needed to study individuals' digital lives, for testing existing theories about media use, and for generation of new theory about the interplay between digital media and development.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0743558419883362

    View details for PubMedID 32161431

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7065687

  • Time for the Human Screenome Project NATURE Reeves, B., Robinson, T., Ram, N. 2020; 577 (7790): 314–17
  • Screenomics: A New Approach for Observing and Studying Individuals' Digital Lives JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT RESEARCH Ram, N., Yang, X., Cho, M., Brinberg, M., Muirhead, F., Reeves, B., Robinson, T. N. 2019
  • Communicating Dominance in a Nonanthropomorphic Robot Using Locomotion ACM TRANSACTIONS ON HUMAN-ROBOT INTERACTION Li, J., Cuadra, A., Mok, B., Reeves, B., Kaye, J., Ju, W. 2019; 8 (1)

    View details for DOI 10.1145/3310357

    View details for Web of Science ID 000471141700004

  • Helping Not Hurting: Applying the Stereotype Content Model and BIAS Map to Social Robotics Mieczkowski, H., Liu, S., Hancock, J., Reeves, B., IEEE IEEE. 2019: 222–29
  • Using Screenshots to Predict Task Switching on Smartphones Yang, X., Ram, N., Robinson, T., Reeves, B., Assoc Comp Machinery ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY. 2019
  • #Science: The potential and the challenges of utilizing social media and other electronic communication platforms in health care. Clinical and translational science Gijsen, V. n., Maddux, M. n., Lavertu, A. n., Gonzalez-Hernandez, G. n., Ram, N. n., Reeves, B. n., Robinson, T. n., Ziesenitz, V. n., Shakhnovich, V. n., Altman, R. n. 2019

    Abstract

    Electronic communication is becoming increasingly popular worldwide, as evidenced by its widespread and rapidly growing use. In medicine however, it remains a novel approach to reach out to patients. Yet, they have the potential for further improving current health care. Electronic platforms could support therapy adherence and communication between physicians and patients. The power of social media as well as other electronic devices can improve adherence as evidenced by the development of the app bant. Additionally, systemic analysis of social media content by Screenome can identify health events not always captured by regular health care. By better identifying these health care events we can improve our current health care system as we will be able to better tailor to the patients' needs. All these techniques are a valuable component of modern health care and will help us into the future of increasingly digital health care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/cts.12687

    View details for PubMedID 31392837

  • Psychological and physiological effects of applying self-control to the mobile phone. PloS one Markowitz, D. M., Hancock, J. T., Bailenson, J. N., Reeves, B. n. 2019; 14 (11): e0224464

    Abstract

    This preregistered study examined the psychological and physiological consequences of exercising self-control with the mobile phone. A total of 125 participants were randomly assigned to sit in an unadorned room for six minutes and either (a) use their mobile phone, (b) sit alone with no phone, or (c) sit with their device but resist using it. Consistent with prior work, participants self-reported more concentration difficulty and more mind wandering with no device present compared to using the phone. Resisting the phone led to greater perceived concentration abilities than sitting without the device (not having external stimulation). Failing to replicate prior work, however, participants without external stimulation did not rate the experience as less enjoyable or more boring than having something to do. We also observed that skin conductance data were consistent across conditions for the first three-minutes of the experiment, after which participants who resisted the phone were less aroused than those who were without the phone. We discuss how the findings contribute to our understanding of exercising self-control with mobile media and how psychological consequences, such as increased mind wandering and focusing challenges, relate to periods of idleness or free thinking.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0224464

    View details for PubMedID 31682619

  • Screenomics: a framework to capture and analyze personal life experiences and the ways that technology shapes them Human-Computer Interaction Reeves, B. 2019
  • Text Extraction and Retrieval from Smartphone Screenshots: Building a Repository for Life in Media Chiatti, A., Cho, M., Gagneja, A., Yang, X., Brinberg, M., Roehrick, K., Choudhury, S., Ram, N., Reeves, B., Giles, C., Assoc Comp Machinery ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY. 2018: 948–55
  • The Fragmentation of Work, Entertainment, E-Mail, and News on a Personal Computer: Motivational Predictors of Switching Between Media Content MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Yeykelis, L., Cummings, J. J., Reeves, B. 2018; 21 (3): 377–402
  • Erratum to: Methods for evaluating medical tests and biomarkers. Diagnostic and prognostic research Gopalakrishna, G. n., Langendam, M. n., Scholten, R. n., Bossuyt, P. n., Leeflang, M. n., Noel-Storr, A. n., Thomas, J. n., Marshall, I. n., Wallace, B. n., Whiting, P. n., Davenport, C. n., Leeflang, M. n., GopalaKrishna, G. n., de Salis, I. n., Mallett, S. n., Wolff, R. n., Whiting, P. n., Riley, R. n., Westwood, M. n., Kleinen, J. n., Collins, G. n., Reitsma, H. n., Moons, K. n., Zapf, A. n., Hoyer, A. n., Kramer, K. n., Kuss, O. n., Ensor, J. n., Deeks, J. J., Martin, E. C., Riley, R. D., Rücker, G. n., Steinhauser, S. n., Schumacher, M. n., Riley, R. n., Ensor, J. n., Snell, K. n., Willis, B. n., Debray, T. n., Moons, K. n., Deeks, J. n., Collins, G. n., di Ruffano, L. F., Willis, B. n., Davenport, C. n., Mallett, S. n., Taylor-Phillips, S. n., Hyde, C. n., Deeks, J. n., Mallett, S. n., Taylor, S. A., Batnagar, G. n., Taylor-Phillips, S. n., Di Ruffano, L. F., Seedat, F. n., Clarke, A. n., Deeks, J. n., Byron, S. n., Nixon, F. n., Albrow, R. n., Walker, T. n., Deakin, C. n., Hyde, C. n., Zhelev, Z. n., Hunt, H. n., di Ruffano, L. F., Yang, Y. n., Abel, L. n., Buchanan, J. n., Fanshawe, T. n., Shinkins, B. n., Wynants, L. n., Verbakel, J. n., Van Huffel, S. n., Timmerman, D. n., Van Calster, B. n., Leeflang, M. n., Zwinderman, A. n., Bossuyt, P. n., Oke, J. n., O'Sullivan, J. n., Perera, R. n., Nicholson, B. n., Bromley, H. L., Roberts, T. E., Francis, A. n., Petrie, D. n., Mann, G. B., Malottki, K. n., Smith, H. n., Deeks, J. n., Billingham, L. n., Sitch, A. n., Mallett, S. n., Deeks, J. n., Gerke, O. n., Holm-Vilstrup, M. n., Segtnan, E. A., Halekoh, U. n., Høilund-Carlsen, P. F., Francq, B. G., Deeks, J. n., Sitch, A. n., Dinnes, J. n., Parkes, J. n., Gregory, W. n., Hewison, J. n., Altman, D. n., Rosenberg, W. n., Selby, P. n., Asselineau, J. n., Perez, P. n., Paye, A. n., Bessede, E. n., Proust-Lima, C. n., Naaktgeboren, C. n., de Groot, J. n., Rutjes, A. n., Bossuyt, P. n., Reitsma, J. n., Moons, K. n., Collins, G. n., Ogundimu, E. n., Cook, J. n., Le Manach, Y. n., Altman, D. n., Wynants, L. n., Vergouwe, Y. n., Van Huffel, S. n., Timmerman, D. n., Van Calster, B. n., Pajouheshnia, R. n., Groenwold, R. n., Moons, K. n., Reitsma, J. n., Peelen, L. n., Van Calster, B. n., Nieboer, D. n., Vergouwe, Y. n., De Cock, B. n., Pencina, M. J., Steyerberg, E. W., Cooper, J. n., Taylor-Phillips, S. n., Parsons, N. n., Stinton, C. n., Smith, S. n., Dickens, A. n., Jordan, R. n., Enocson, A. n., Fitzmaurice, D. n., Sitch, A. n., Adab, P. n., Francq, B. G., Boachie, C. n., Vidmar, G. n., Freeman, K. n., Connock, M. n., Taylor-Phillips, S. n., Court, R. n., Clarke, A. n., de Groot, J. n., Naaktgeboren, C. n., Reitsma, H. n., Moons, C. n., Harris, J. n., Mumford, A. n., Plummer, Z. n., Lee, K. n., Reeves, B. n., Rogers, C. n., Verheyden, V. n., Angelini, G. D., Murphy, G. J., Huddy, J. n., Ni, M. n., Good, K. n., Cooke, G. n., Bossuyt, P. n., Hanna, G. n., Ma, J. n., Altman, D. n., Collins, G. n., Moons, K. G., de Groot, J. A., Mallett, S. n., Altman, D. G., Reitsma, J. B., Collins, G. S., Moons, K. G., Altman, D. G., Reitsma, J. B., Collins, G. S., Kamarudin, A. N., Kolamunnage-Dona, R. n., Cox, T. n., Ni, M. n., Huddy, J. n., Borsci, S. n., Hanna, G. n., Pérez, T. n., Pardo, M. C., Candela-Toha, A. n., Muriel, A. n., Zamora, J. n., Sanghera, S. n., Mohiuddin, S. n., Martin, R. n., Donovan, J. n., Coast, J. n., Seo, M. K., Cairns, J. n., Mitchell, E. n., Smith, A. n., Wright, J. n., Hall, P. n., Messenger, M. n., Calder, N. n., Wickramasekera, N. n., Vinall-Collier, K. n., Lewington, A. n., Pajouheshnia, R. n., Damen, J. n., Groenwold, R. n., Moons, K. n., Peelen, L. n., Messenger, M. n., Cairns, D. n., Smith, A. n., Hutchinson, M. n., Wright, J. n., Hall, P. n., Calder, N. n., Sturgeon, C. n., Mitchel, L. n., Kift, R. n., Christakoudi, S. n., Rungall, M. n., Mobillo, P. n., Montero, R. n., Tsui, T. L., Kon, S. P., Tucker, B. n., Sacks, S. n., Farmer, C. n., Strom, T. n., Chowdhury, P. n., Rebollo-Mesa, I. n., Hernandez-Fuentes, M. n., Damen, J. A., Debray, T. P., Heus, P. n., Hooft, L. n., Moons, K. G., Pajouheshnia, R. n., Reitsma, J. B., Scholten, R. J., Damen, J. A., Hooft, L. n., Schuit, E. n., Debray, T. P., Collins, G. S., Tzoulaki, I. n., Lassale, C. M., Siontis, G. C., Chiocchia, V. n., Roberts, C. n., Schlüssel, M. M., Gerry, S. n., Black, J. A., Heus, P. n., van der Schouw, Y. T., Peelen, L. M., Moons, K. G., Damen, J. A., Debray, T. P., Heus, P. n., Hooft, L. n., Moons, K. G., Pajouheshnia, R. n., Reitsma, J. B., Scholten, R. J., Ma, J. n., Altman, D. n., Collins, G. n., Spence, G. n., McCartney, D. n., van den Bruel, A. n., Lasserson, D. n., Hayward, G. n., Vach, W. n., de Jong, A. n., Burggraaff, C. n., Hoekstra, O. n., Zijlstra, J. n., de Vet, H. n., Hunt, H. n., Hyde, C. n., Graziadio, S. n., Allen, J. n., Johnston, L. n., O'Leary, R. n., Power, M. n., Allen, J. n., Graziadio, S. n., Johnson, L. n., O'Leary, R. n., Power, M. n., Waters, R. n., Simpson, J. n., Johnston, L. n., Allen, J. n., Graziadio, S. n., O'Leary, R. n., Waters, R. n., Power, M. n., Mallett, S. n., Fanshawe, T. R., Phillips, P. n., Plumb, A. n., Helbren, E. n., Halligan, S. n., Taylor, S. A., Gale, A. n., Mallett, S. n., Sekula, P. n., Altman, D. G., Sauerbrei, W. n., Mallett, S. n., Fanshawe, T. R., Forman, J. R., Dutton, S. J., Takwoingi, Y. n., Hensor, E. M., Nichols, T. E., Shinkins, B. n., Yang, Y. n., Abel, L. n., Di Ruffano, L. F., Fanshawe, T. n., Kempf, E. n., Porcher, R. n., de Beyer, J. n., Moons, K. n., Altman, D. n., Reitsma, H. n., Hopewell, S. n., Sauerbrei, W. n., Collins, G. n., Dennis, J. n., Shields, B. n., Jones, A. n., Henley, W. n., Pearson, E. n., Hattersley, A. n., Heus, P. n., Damen, J. A., Pajouheshnia, R. n., Scholten, R. J., Reitsma, J. B., Collins, G. S., Altman, D. G., Moons, K. G., Hooft, L. n., Shields, B. n., Dennis, J. n., Jones, A. n., Henley, W. n., Pearson, E. n., Hattersley, A. n., Scheibler, F. n., Rummer, A. n., Sturtz, S. n., Großelfinger, R. n., Banister, K. n., Ramsay, C. n., Azuara-Blanco, A. n., Cook, J. n., Boachie, C. n., Burr, J. n., Kumarasamy, M. n., Bourne, R. n., Uchegbu, I. n., Borsci, S. n., Murphy, J. n., Hanna, G. n., Uchegbu, I. n., Carter, A. n., Murphy, J. n., Ni, M. n., Marti, J. n., Eatock, J. n., Uchegbu, I. n., Robotham, J. n., Dudareva, M. n., Gilchrist, M. n., Holmes, A. n., Uchegbu, I. n., Borsci, S. n., Monaghan, P. n., Lord, S. n., StJohn, A. n., Sandberg, S. n., Cobbaert, C. n., Lennartz, L. n., Verhagen-Kamerbeek, W. n., Ebert, C. n., Bossuyt, P. n., Horvath, A. n., Jenniskens, K. n., Naaktgeboren, C. n., Reitsma, J. n., Moons, K. n., de Groot, J. n., Hyde, C. n., Peters, J. n., Grigore, B. n., Peters, J. n., Hyde, C. n., Hyde, C. n., Ukoumunne, O. n., Peters, J. n., Zhelev, Z. n., Levis, B. n., Benedetti, A. n., Levis, A. W., Ioannidis, J. P., Shrier, I. n., Cuijpers, P. n., Gilbody, S. n., Kloda, L. A., McMillan, D. n., Patten, S. B., Steele, R. J., Ziegelstein, R. C., Bombardier, C. H., Osório, F. d., Fann, J. R., Gjerdingen, D. n., Lamers, F. n., Lotrakul, M. n., Loureiro, S. R., Löwe, B. n., Shaaban, J. n., Stafford, L. n., van Weert, H. C., Whooley, M. A., Williams, L. S., Wittkampf, K. A., Yeung, A. S., Thombs, B. D., Peters, J. n., Cooper, C. n., Buchanan, J. n., Nieto, T. n., Smith, C. n., Tucker, O. n., Dretzke, J. n., Beggs, A. n., Rai, N. n., Davenport, C. n., Bayliss, S. n., Stevens, S. n., Snell, K. n., Mallet, S. n., Deeks, J. n., Sundar, S. n., Hall, E. n., Porta, N. n., Estelles, D. L., de Bono, J. n. 2017; 1: 11

    Abstract

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1186/s41512-016-0001-y.].

    View details for PubMedID 31095132

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6460744

  • Touching a Mechanical Body: Tactile Contact With Body Parts of a Humanoid Robot Is Physiologically Arousing JOURNAL OF HUMAN-ROBOT INTERACTION Li, J., Ju, W., Reeves, B. 2017; 6 (3): 118–30
  • The Use of Media in Media Psychology MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Reeves, B., Yeykelis, L., Cummings, J. J. 2016; 19 (1): 49-71
  • The Impact of Vivid Messages on Reducing Energy Consumption Related to Hot Water Use ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR Bailey, J. O., Bailenson, J. N., Flora, J., Armel, K. C., Voelker, D., Reeves, B. 2015; 47 (5): 570-592
  • Increasing Energy Efficiency With Entertainment Media: An Experimental and Field Test of the Influence of a Social Game on Performance of Energy Behaviors ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR Reeves, B., Cummings, J. J., Scarborough, J. K., Yeykelis, L. 2015; 47 (1): 102-115
  • Multitasking on a Single Device: Arousal and the Frequency, Anticipation, and Prediction of Switching Between Media Content on a Computer JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION Yeykelis, L., Cummings, J. J., Reeves, B. 2014; 64 (1): 167-192

    View details for DOI 10.1111/jcom.12070

    View details for Web of Science ID 000337628100009

  • Computer agents versus avatars: Responses to interactive game characters controlled by a computer or other player INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HUMAN-COMPUTER STUDIES Lim, S., Reeves, B. 2010; 68 (1-2): 57-68
  • Government Uses for Games and Virtual Worlds: Optimizing Choices for Citizens and Government Workers in the Areas of Energy Efficiency, Educational Assessment, Worker Productivity, Health and Quality of Information Exchanges White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Reeves, B., Cunningham, J., Scarborough, J., Read, J. L. 2010
  • Being in the Game: Effects of Avatar Choice and Point of View on Psychophysiological Responses During Play MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Lim, S., Reeves, B. 2009; 12 (4): 348-370
  • Being in the game: Effects of avatar choice and point of view on arousal responses during play Media Psychology Reeves, B., Lim, S., 2009; 12 (4): 348-370
  • Total Engagement: Using Games and Virtual Worlds to Change the Way People Work and Businesses Compete Reeves, B., Read, J. L. Harvard Business School Press. 2009
  • Leadership's online labs HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW Reeves, B., Malone, T. W., O'Driscoll, T. 2008; 86 (5): 58-?
  • A marketplace for attention: Responses to a synthetic currency used to signal information importance in E-mail First Monday Reeves, B., Roy, S., Gorman, B., Morley, T. 2008; 13 (5)
  • Leaderships Living Lab: Implications of Multiplayer Games for the Enterprise Harvard Business Review Reeves, B., Malone, T., O'Driscoll, T. 2008
  • The effect of user control on the cognitive and emotional processing of pictures MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Wise, K., Reeves, B. 2007; 9 (3): 549-566
  • Foundations and opportunities for an interdisciplinary sciences of learning. The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences Bransford, J., Barron, B., Pea, R., Meltzoff, A., Kuhl, P., Bell, P., Stevens, D., Shwartz, D., Vye, N., Reeves, B., Roschelle, J., Sabelli, N. Cambridge University Press. 2006
  • The new videomalaise: Effects of televised incivility on political trust AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE REVIEW Mutz, D. C., Reeves, B. 2005; 99 (1): 1-15
  • Learning theories and education: Toward a decade of synergy Handbook of Educational Psychology Bransford, J., Vye, N., Stevens, R., Kuhl, P., Schwatz, D., Bell, P., Meltzoff, A., Barron, B., Pea, R., Reeves, B., Roschelle, J., Sabelli, N. 2005; 2
  • Perceptual bandwith COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM Reeves, B., Nass, C. 2000; 43 (3): 65-70
  • Social issues and the effects of high-bandwidth interactions Proceedings of the Internet2 Socio-Technical Summit Reeves, B. 2000: 81–89
  • The effects of animated characters on anxiety, task performance and evaluations of user interfaces Proceedings of the CHI 2000 Conference Reeves, B. 2000
  • The effects of screen size and message content on arousal and attention Media Psychology Reeves, B., Lang, A., Young, E., Tatar, D. 1999; 1: 49-67
  • Switching channels: The effects of television channels on the mental representations of television news JOURNAL OF BROADCASTING & ELECTRONIC MEDIA Leshner, G., Reeves, B., Nass, C. 1998; 42 (1): 21-33
  • Negative video as structure: Emotion, attention, capacity, and memory JOURNAL OF BROADCASTING & ELECTRONIC MEDIA Lang, A., NEWHAGEN, J., Reeves, B. 1996; 40 (4): 460-477
  • A bio-informational theory of emotion: Motion and image size effects on viewers JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION Detenber, B. H., Reeves, B. 1996; 46 (3): 66-84
  • Technology and roles: A tale of two TVs JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION Nass, C., Reeves, B., Leshner, G. 1996; 46 (2): 121-128
  • The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television and New Media Like Real People and Places Reeves, B., Nass, C. Cambridge University Press. 1996
  • Hemispheres of scholarship: Psychological and other approaches to studying communication The audience and its landscape Reeves, B. Westview Press. 1996: 265–280
  • CAN COMPUTER PERSONALITIES BE HUMAN PERSONALITIES INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HUMAN-COMPUTER STUDIES Nass, C., Moon, Y., Fogg, B. J., Reeves, B., Dryer, D. C. 1995; 43 (2): 223-239
  • Designing experiments that assess psychological responses to media messages Measuring psychological responses to media Reeves, B., Geiger, S. Lawrence Erlbaum. 1994
  • THE EFFECTS OF SCENE CHANGES AND SEMANTIC RELATEDNESS ON ATTENTION TO TELEVISION COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Geiger, S., Reeves, B. 1993; 20 (2): 155-175
  • WE INTERRUPT THIS PROGRAM ... ATTENTION FOR TELEVISION SEQUENCES HUMAN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Geiger, S., Reeves, B. 1993; 19 (3): 368-387
  • We interrupt this program: Attention for television sequences Human Communication Research Reeves, B., Geiger, S. 1993; 19: 368-387
  • THE EVENINGS BAD-NEWS - EFFECTS OF COMPELLING NEGATIVE TELEVISION-NEWS IMAGES ON MEMORY JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION Newhagen, J. E., Reeves, B. 1992; 42 (2): 25-41
  • ON HOW WE STUDY AND WHAT WE STUDY JOURNAL OF BROADCASTING & ELECTRONIC MEDIA Reeves, B. 1992; 36 (2): 235-238
  • On how we study and what we study Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media Reeves, B. 1992; 36: 235-238
  • This evening’s bad news: Effects of compelling negative television news images on memory Journal of Communication Newhagen, J., Reeves, B. 1992; 42
  • MEDIA STUDIES AND PSYCHOLOGY COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Reeves, B., Anderson, D. R. 1991; 18 (5): 597-600
  • NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE TELEVISION MESSAGES - EFFECTS OF MESSAGE TYPE AND CONTEXT ON ATTENTION AND MEMORY AMERICAN BEHAVIORAL SCIENTIST Reeves, B. R., NEWHAGEN, J., Maibach, E., Basil, M., Kurz, K. 1991; 34 (6): 679-694
  • COMBINING, DISTINGUISHING, AND GENERATING THEORIES IN COMMUNICATION - A DOMAINS OF ANALYSIS FRAMEWORK COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Nass, C. I., Reeves, B. 1991; 18 (2): 240-261
  • Positive and negative political advertising: Effectiveness of ads and perceptions of campaigns Television and political advertising: Psychological processes Basil, M., Schooler, C., Reeves, B. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1991: 245–262
  • Evaluation and memory for political candidates in televised commercials Television and political advertising: Psychological processes Geiger, S., Reeves, B. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1991: 125–144
  • Cognitive processing of media Special issue of Communication Research Reeves, B., Anderson, D. 1991; 18
  • Emotion and memory responses to negative political advertising Television and political advertising: Psychological processes Newhagen, J., Reeves, B. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1991: 197–220
  • Negative and positive television messages: Effects of message type and message context on attention and memory American Behavioral Scientist Reeves, B., Newhagen, J., Maibach, E., Basil, M., Kurz, K. 1991: 679-694
  • THEORIES ABOUT NEWS AND THEORIES ABOUT COGNITION - ARGUMENTS FOR A MORE RADICAL SEPARATION AMERICAN BEHAVIORAL SCIENTIST Reeves, B. 1989; 33 (2): 191-198
  • EMOTIONAL TELEVISION SCENES AND HEMISPHERIC-SPECIALIZATION HUMAN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Reeves, B., Lang, A., Thorson, E., Rothschild, M. 1989; 15 (4): 493-508
  • INFLUENCE OF STORY SCHEMA DEVELOPMENT ON CHILDRENS ATTENTION TO TELEVISION COMMUNICATION RESEARCH MEADOWCROFT, J. M., Reeves, B. 1989; 16 (3): 352-374
  • Influence of story schema development on children's attention to television Communication Research Reeves, B., Meadowcroft, J. 1989; 16: 352-374
  • HEMISPHERICALLY LATERALIZED EEG AS A RESPONSE TO TELEVISION COMMERCIALS JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH ROTHSCHILD, M. L., Hyun, Y. J., Reeves, B., Thorson, E., Goldstein, R. 1988; 15 (2): 185-198
  • CITATION NETWORKS OF COMMUNICATION JOURNALS, 1977-1985 - CLIQUES AND POSITIONS, CITATIONS MADE AND CITATIONS RECEIVED HUMAN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Rice, R. E., Borgman, C. L., Reeves, B. 1988; 15 (2): 256-283
  • Communication and children: Development of language, communicative competence, and understanding of media Handbook of communication science Wartella, E., Reeves, B. Sage. 1987: 619–650
  • WATCHING TELEVISION - EXPERIMENTS ON THE VIEWING PROCESS COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Reeves, B., Thorson, E. 1986; 13 (3): 343-361
  • EEG ACTIVITY AND THE PROCESSING OF TELEVISION COMMERCIALS COMMUNICATION RESEARCH ROTHSCHILD, M. L., Thorson, E., Reeves, B., Hirsch, J. E., Goldstein, R. 1986; 13 (2): 182-220
  • Effects of Mass Communication Reeves, B., Hawkins, R. Science Research Associates, Inc.. 1986
  • Attention to local and global complexity in television messagesCommunication yearbook Communication yearbook 10 Thorson, E., Reeves, B., Schleuder, J. Sage. 1986
  • Attention to television: Psychological theories and chronometric measures Perspectives on media effects Reeves, B., Thorson, E., Schleuder, J. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1986
  • ATTENTION TO TELEVISION - INTRASTIMULUS EFFECTS OF MOVEMENT AND SCENE CHANGES ON ALPHA-VARIATION OVER TIME INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE Reeves, B., Thorson, E., ROTHSCHILD, M. L., McDonald, D., Hirsch, J., Goldstein, R. 1985; 27 (3-4): 241-255

    Abstract

    Central and occipital EEG alpha were used as an on-line measure of momentary changes in covert attention during television viewing. Alpha was recorded during nine 30-second commercials shown embedded in a half-hour situation comedy. Two time series were constructed for data analysis. A stimulus series consisted of codes representing the presence or absence of scene changes or person and object movement for each half-second interval of the commercials. The alpha series consisted of median alpha scores for each half-second interval, aggregated across 26 subjects. The alpha series was regressed on the movement and scene change series, both of which produced significant increments in R, even after autocorrelational effects inherent in the alpha series were removed. As a validity check on the attentional interpretation of alpha, it was shown that mean alpha for each commercial was significantly (negatively) correlated with recall and recognition of commercial contents. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for further use of continuously-recorded alpha in research on factors that influence attention to television.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985C649200008

    View details for PubMedID 4044133

  • Memory effects of over-time measures of viewer liking and activity during programs and commercials Advances in consumer research Thorson, E., Reeves, B. Association for Consumer Research. 1985
  • Effects of program context on the processing of television commercials Proceedings of the American Academy of Advertising Schleuder, J., Lang, A., Rothschild, M. 1985
  • HISTORICAL TRENDS IN RESEARCH ON CHILDREN AND THE MEDIA - 1900-1960 JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION WARTELLA, E., Reeves, B. 1985; 35 (2): 118-133
  • MESSAGE COMPLEXITY AND ATTENTION TO TELEVISION COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Thorson, E., Reeves, B., SCHLEUDER, J. 1985; 12 (4): 427-454
  • Trends in children’s television The future of children's television Wartella, E., Reeves, B. Boys Town. 1984: 15–28
  • A BIBLIOMETRIC EVALUATION OF CORE JOURNALS IN COMMUNICATION-RESEARCH HUMAN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Reeves, B., Borgman, C. L. 1983; 10 (1): 119-136
  • Recurring issues in research on children and media Education Technology Warella, E., Reeves, B. 1983; 23: 5-8
  • Now you see them, now you don't: Demonstrating effects of communication programs Public Relations Quarterly, Fall Reeves, B. 1983
  • 'Fraught with such great possibilities': The historical relationship of communication research to mass media regulation Proceedings of the tenth annual telecommunications policy research conference Reeves, B., Baughman, J. 1983: 19–52
  • Television's influence on children's encoding of person information Human Communication Research Reeves, B., Garramone, G. 1983; 10: 257-268
  • Children's person perception: Generalization from television to real people Human Communication Research Reeves, B., Garramone, G. 1982; 8: 317-326
  • Social cognition and mass communication Social cognition and communication Reeves, B., Chaffee, S., Tims, A. 1982: 287–326
  • CHILDREN AND TELEVISION-NEWS JOURNALISM QUARTERLY Drew, D. G., REEVES, B. B. 1980; 57 (1): 45-?
  • The nature of mass media effects Television and social behavior: Beyond violence and children McLeod, J., Reeves, B. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1980: 17–54
  • LEARNING FROM A TELEVISION-NEWS STORY COMMUNICATION RESEARCH Drew, D., Reeves, B. 1980; 7 (1): 121-135
  • Children's impressions of television characters Proceedings of the sixth annual telecommunications policy research conference Reeves, B., Faber, R. 1979
  • The dimensional structure of children's perceptions of television characters: A replication Human Communication Research Reeves, B., Lometti, G. 1979; 5: 247-256
  • Children's understanding of television people Children communicating: Media and development of thought, speech and understanding Reeves, B. Safe. 1979: 115–156
  • Children's perceived reality of television and effects of TV on social behavior Journalism Quarterly Reeves, B. 1978; 55: 682-689
  • A multidimensional measure of children's identification with television characters Journal of Broadcasting Reeves, B., Miller, M. M. 1978; 22: 71-86
  • Investigating the assumptions of uses and gratifications research Communication Research Lometti, G., Reeves, B., Bybee, C. 1977; 4: 321-338
  • Children's perceptions of television characters Human Communication Research Reeves, B., Greenberg, B. 1977; 3: 113-117
  • Linking dramatic TV content to children's occupational sex role stereotypes Journal of Broadcasting Miller, M. M., Reeves, B. 1976; 20: 35-50
  • Children and the perceived reality of television Journal of Social Issues Greenberg, B., Reeves, B. 1976; 32: 86-97
  • Children's television and the economically disadvantaged child: Research findings and policy implications The federal role in children's television programming Greenberg, B., Reeves, B. Institute for Communication Research. 1975