Bio


Vasiliki (Vaso) Rahimzadeh, PhD is an applied bioethics scholar with research interests at the intersection of precision medicine, data governance and public policy.

Institute Affiliations


  • Member, Maternal & Child Health Research Institute (MCHRI)

Honors & Awards


  • Gordon A. MacLaughlan Prize for best dissertation in the biological sciences, McGill University (June 2020)
  • Governor General's Gold Medal, McGill University (June 2020)
  • David McCutcheon Pediatric Palliative Care Fellowship, McGill University Health Centre (09/2013-09/2014)
  • McGill Med Star Award, McGill University Faculty of Medicine (05/2019)
  • Best Poster Prize in Medicine and Public Health, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) (05/2018)
  • Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (05/2016-05/2019)
  • Friends of McGill Fellowship (declined), McGill University (05/2014-05/2015)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Canadian College of Family Physicians (2018 - Present)
  • Trainee representative, Canadian Institutes of Health Research Standing Committee on Ethics (2017 - Present)
  • Member, American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (2017 - 2019)

Professional Education


  • Phd, McGill University, Family Medicine and Primary Care Research (2019)
  • MSc, McGill University, Experimental Medicine (2014)
  • B.S., University of California Berkeley, Microbial Biology (2012)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Pros and cons of prosent as an alternative to traditional consent in medical research. Journal of medical ethics Rahimzadeh, V. N. 2020

    Abstract

    In their recent article, Porsdam Mann et al propose to share biomedical research data more widely, securely and efficiently using blockchain technologies.1 They present compelling arguments for how the blockchain presents both a technological innovation, and a deontologically grounded policy innovation to traditional research consent. Their proposal can be read in conversation with a rich body of evidence to suggest current consent processes are problematic on at least one of tripartite bases in biomedical research: that it be fully informed. This response attempts to further the author's discussion of social justice discourse in, and of their proposed prosent model to enhance engagement among under-represented and vulnerable populations in research, specifically. Motivating this response is the view that advancing technological capabilities is no doubt necessary, but on its own insufficient to reinvigorate distributive, procedural and social justice as guiding principles for con/prosent processes. I offer three pros and cons to consider in effort to deepen the model's commitments to social justice to historically marginalised groups in the biomedical research enterprise.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/medethics-2020-106443

    View details for PubMedID 32571849