Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)


Showing 1-10 of 29 Results

  • Mehran Sahami

    Mehran Sahami

    Tencent Chair of the of the Computer Science Department, James and Ellenor Chesebrough Professor and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMehran Sahami is Tencent Chair of the Computer Science Department and the James and Ellenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering. As a Professor (Teaching) in the Computer Science department, he is also a Bass Fellow in Undergraduate Education and previously served as the Associate Chair for Education in Computer Science. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was a Senior Research Scientist at Google. His research interests include computer science education, artificial intelligence, and ethics. He served as co-chair of the ACM/IEEE-CS joint task force on Computer Science Curricula 2013, which created curricular guidelines for college programs in Computer Science at an international level. He has also served as chair of the ACM Education Board, an elected member of the ACM Council, and was appointed by California Governor Jerry Brown to the state's Computer Science Strategic Implementation Plan Advisory Panel.

  • Aadesh Salecha

    Aadesh Salecha

    Data Scientist, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)
    Data Scientist, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioAadesh Salecha is a computer scientist who works on integrating Artificial Intelligence and Psychology. He graduated from the University of Minnesota, where he worked with Prof. Jaideep Srivastava on misinformation spread and its mitigation mechanisms. At Stanford, he works with Prof. Johannes Eichsteadt on using cognitive psychology and psychometrics to understand bias development in Large Language Models. He is also collaborating the effort on the creation of new-age psychological interventions using AI to democratize access and improve personalization and retention. His work is focused on using computational methods for societal good by facilitating the measurement and causal analysis of population health metrics like drug abuse, subjective-wellbeing, etc.

  • Ian Sato

    Ian Sato

    Program Manager, Education, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioIan Sato (he/him) is the education program manager at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He is responsible for the curation, management, and execution of HAI's education programs across various learner groups such as executives, government officials, and healthcare professionals. He aspires to help audiences from diverse backgrounds gain perspective on the potential of human-centered AI to support its ethical application and ensure a more equitable future for humankind.

    Prior to joining HAI, Ian spent a decade working in education abroad, most recently as a director of academic affairs at Hult EF Corporate Education. In this role, he consulted with government and corporate entities operating in the Asia Pacific region as a thought leader in education, with a particular focus on the development of effective hybrid and virtual programs. Prior to that he worked in roles across the academic spectrum in research and teaching roles for K-12, university, corporate, and executive learning audiences.

    Ian earned his B.A. in Philosophy from DePaul University and M.A. in Philosophy from University of Oregon.

  • Londa Schiebinger

    Londa Schiebinger

    John L. Hinds Professor of the History of Science

    BioLonda Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science in the History Department at Stanford University and Director of the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment Project. From 2004-2010, Schiebinger served as the Director of Stanford's Clayman Institute for Gender Research. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Professor Schiebinger received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1984 and is a leading international authority on gender and science. Over the past thirty years, Schiebinger's work has been devoted to teasing apart three analytically distinct but interlocking pieces of the gender and science puzzle: the history of women's participation in science; gender in the structure of scientific institutions; and the gendering of human knowledge.

    Londa Schiebinger presented the keynote address and wrote the conceptual background paper for the United Nations' Expert Group Meeting on Gender, Science, and Technology, September 2010 in Paris. She presented the findings at the United Nations in New York, February 2011 with an update spring 2014. In 2022, she prepared the background paper for the United Nations 67th session of the Commission on the Status of Women’s priority theme, Innovation and Technological Change, and Education in the Digital Age for Achieving Gender Equality and The Empowerment of all Women and Girls.

    In 2011-2014, Schiebinger entered into major collaborations with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation to promote Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment. This project draws experts from across the U.S., Europe, Canada, and Asia, and was presented at the European Parliament, July 2013 as Gendered Innovations: How Gender Analysis Contributes to Research. In 2018-2020, Schiebinger directed the European Commission Expert Group to produce Gendered Innovations 2: How Inclusive Analysis Contributes to Research and Innovation.

    Schiebinger’s work has been featured in Science: A Framework for Sex, Gender, and Diversity Analysis in Research: Funding Agencies Have Ample Room to Improve Their Policies (2022); Nature: Sex and Gender Analysis Improves Science and Engineering (2019); Nature: Design AI so that it's Fair (2018); Nature: Accounting for Sex and Gender Makes for Better Science (2020).

    Her work in the eighteenth century investigates the circulation of knowledge in the Atlantic World. Her Secret Cures of Slaves: People, Plants, and Medicine in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World reconceptualizes research in four areas: first and foremost knowledge of African contributions to early modern science; the historiography of race in science; the history of human experimentation; and the role of science in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Her prize-winning Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World investigates women's indigenous knowledge of abortifacients and why this knowledge did not travel.

    Londa Schiebinger has been the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. She was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium (2013), the Faculty of Science, Lund University, Sweden (2017), and the University of Valencia, Spain (2018); the Berlin Falling Walls Breakthrough Winner in Science & Innovation Management (2022). Her work has been translated into numerous languages. In 2022/23, she served as an advisor to the Berlin University Alliance.

  • Dustin Schroeder

    Dustin Schroeder

    Associate Professor of Geophysics, of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy research focuses on advancing the scientific and technical foundations of geophysical ice penetrating radar and its use in observing and understanding the interaction of ice and water in the solar system. I am primarily interested in the subglacial and englacial conditions of rapidly changing ice sheets and their contribution to global sea level rise. However, a growing secondary focus of my work is the exploration of icy moons. I am also interested in the development and application of science-optimized geophysical radar systems. I consider myself a radio glaciologist and strive to approach problems from both an earth system science and a radar system engineering perspective. I am actively engaged with the flow of information through each step of the observational science process; from instrument and experiment design, through data processing and analysis, to modeling and inference. This allows me to draw from a multidisciplinary set of tools to test system-scale and process-level hypotheses. For me, this deliberate integration of science and engineering is the most powerful and satisfying way to approach questions in Earth and planetary science.