Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 221-230 of 276 Results

  • Krishna Shenoy

    Krishna Shenoy

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe conduct neuroscience, neuroengineering and translational research to better understand how the brain controls movement, and to design medical systems to assist people with paralysis. These are referred to as brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and intra-cortical neural prostheses. We conduct this research as part of our Neural Prosthetic Systems Lab (NPSL) and our Neural Prosthetics Translational Lab (NPTL), which I co-direct with Prof. Jaimie Henderson, M.D.

  • Seth Lawrence Sherman, MD

    Seth Lawrence Sherman, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on ways to augment tissue healing, improve human performance, and prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Approaching these challenges through parallel basic science and clinical pathways, our team works from the “bedside to the bench and back to the bedside”, identifying areas of clinical need to deliver evidence-based solutions for patients.

    We collaborates with orthopaedic surgeons, non-surgical physicians, and researchers within bioengineering, human performance, and musculoskeletal imaging across the Stanford campus. The team is developing novel methods to accurately record human movement (including wearable technology, phone-based systems), rapid MRI imaging protocols, and exploring the use of biomarkers to track injury and recovery. This research builds on my earlier work, which utilized portable, inexpensive software for Microsoft Kinect to detect knee injury risk in youth athletes performing a drop vertical jump test. The team’s multifaceted goal is: 1) develop innovative methods to screen for injury risk (i.e. youth athlete non-contact ACL), 2) create targeted intervention programs to reduce risk, 3) enhance athletic performance; and 4) improve accuracy of return to play testing following injury/surgery (i.e. clinical evaluation, biomarkers, functional tests, imaging analysis for healing).

    In the laboratory,our team investigates cellular and molecular deficiencies in tissue types including tendon, ligament, articular cartilage, and meniscus. By understanding aberrant pathways leading to tissue injury, they can identify innovative therapeutic targets for intervention. In collaboration with the Genetic Engineering and Synthetic Biology laboratories, Dr. Sherman’s research has explored the role of orthobiologic agents such as platelet rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) for tissue healing in patella tendinopathy (the breakdown of collagen in a tendon). Our lab is also investigating the use of CBD for musculoskeletal applications as an alternative to commonly used local anesthetics and cortisone derivatives. In my earlier work, we researched the cellular toxicity of such applications.

    In addition to basic science research, I have helped to build a Sports Medicine clinical research team that includes several full-time clinical research coordinators, residents, fellows, and students. The team collects prospective outcomes on their patients using a novel data collection platform called Patient IQ. The group is part of the JUPITER study which is the largest, multicenter study ever assembled in patellofemoral instability. They are additionally planning to enroll in FDA-approved clinical studies investigating pioneering strategies for knee cartilage restoration, joint preservation, and orthobiologic injections for osteoarthritis. Recent clinical publications explore outcomes in meniscus preservation and transplantation, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, osteochondral allograft and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI), and surgical augmentation using PRP/BMAC. The clinical research team actively reports results of non-surgical and surgical interventions to continue to introduce new knowledge to the field, with the goal of improved patient outcome.

  • Matthew Smuck, MD

    Matthew Smuck, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI direct the Wearable Health Lab at Stanford, investigating medical applications of mobile technology to improve musculoskeletal and neurologic disease detection, treatment and prevention.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Alex and Susie Algard Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of the Sonnenburg Lab research program are to (i) elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and (ii) devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. We investigate the principles that govern gut microbial community function and interaction with the host using a broad range of experimental approaches including studies of microbiomes in diverse human cohorts.

  • David Spiegel

    David Spiegel

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spiegel's research program involves mind/body interactions, including cancer progression, the response to traumatic stress, and the effect of hypnosis on the perception of pain and anxiety.

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.