Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


Showing 1-20 of 40 Results

  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on merging advances in molecular biology with those in biomedical imaging to advance the field of molecular imaging. Imaging for the purpose of better understanding cancer biology and applications in gene and cell therapy, as well as immunotherapy are all being studied. A key long-term focus is the earlier detection of cancer by combining in vitro diagnostics and molecular imaging.

  • Xiaojing Gao

    Xiaojing Gao

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we design biological systems as “smart medicine” that sense patients’ states, process the information, and respond accordingly? To realize this vision, we will tackle fundamental challenges across different levels of complexity, such as (1) protein components that minimize their crosstalk with human cells and immunogenicity, (2) biomolecular circuits that function robustly in different cells and are easy to deliver, (3) multicellular consortia that communicate through scalable channels, and (4) therapeutic modules that interface with physiological inputs/outputs. Our engineering targets include biomolecules, molecular circuits, viruses, and cells, and our approach combines quantitative experimental analysis with computational simulation. The molecular tools we build will be applied to diverse fields such as neurobiology and cancer therapy.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Justin Gardner

    Justin Gardner

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow does neural activity in the human cortex create our sense of visual perception? We use a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, computational modeling and analysis, and psychophysical measurements to link human perception to cortical brain activity.

  • Joseph Garner

    Joseph Garner

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe medical research community has long recognized that "good well-being is good science". The lab uses an integrated interdisciplinary approach to explore this interface, while providing tangible deliverables for the well-being of human patients and research animals.

  • Brice Gaudilliere

    Brice Gaudilliere

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe advent of high dimensional flow cytometry has revolutionized our ability to study and visualize the human immune system. Our group combines high parameter mass cytometry (a.k.a Cytometry by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, CyTOF), with advanced bio-computational methods to study how the human immune system responds and adapts to acute physiological perturbations. The laboratory currently focuses on two clinical scenarios: surgical trauma and pregnancy.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Olivier Gevaert

    Olivier Gevaert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab focuses on biomedical data fusion: the development of machine learning methods for biomedical decision support using multi-scale biomedical data. We primarily use methods based on regularized linear regression to accomplish this. We primarily focus on applications in oncology and neuroscience.

  • William Giardino

    William Giardino

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Giardino Laboratory: our group aims to decipher the neural mechanisms underlying psychiatric conditions of stress, addiction, and sleep disturbances. Our work uses combinatorial technologies for precisely mapping, monitoring, and manipulating neural circuits that drive hedonic and homeostatic states. Projects in the lab are funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIAAA), the Whitehall Foundation, and the Brain Research Foundation.

  • Erin Gibson

    Erin Gibson

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlia make up more than half of the cells in the human brain, but we are just beginning to understand the complex and multifactorial role glia play in health and disease. Glia are decidedly dynamic in form and function. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this dynamic nature of glia is imperative to developing novel therapeutic strategies for diseases of the nervous system that involve aberrant gliogenesis, especially related to changes in myelination.

  • Rona Giffard

    Rona Giffard

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAstrocytes, microglia and neurons interact, and have unique vulnerabilities to injury based on their patterns of gene expression and their functional roles. We focus on the cellular and molecular basis of brain cell injury in stroke. We study the effects of altering miRNA expression, altering levels of heat shock and cell death regulatory proteins. Our goal is to improve outcome by improving mitochondrial function and brain cell survival, and reducing oxidative stress and inflammation.

  • William Gilly

    William Gilly

    Professor of Oceans

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work has contributed to understanding electrical excitability in nerve & muscle in organisms ranging from brittle-stars to mammals. Current research addresses behavior, physiology and ecology of squid through field and lab approaches. Electronic tagging plus in situ video, acoustic and oceanographic methods are used to study behaviors and life history in the field. Lab work focuses on control of chromogenic behavior by the chromatophore network and of locomotion by the giant axon system.

  • Lisa Giocomo

    Lisa Giocomo

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the organization of cortical circuits important for spatial navigation and memory. We are particularly focused on medial entorhinal cortex, where many neurons fire in spatially specific patterns and thus offer a measurable output for molecular manipulations. We combine electrophysiology, genetic approaches and behavioral paradigms to unravel the mechanisms and behavioral relevance of non-sensory cortical organization. Our first line of research is focused on determining the cellular and molecular components crucial to the neural representation of external space by functionally defined cell types in entorhinal cortex (grid, border and head direction cells). We plan to use specific targeting of ion channels, combined with in vivo tetrode recordings, to determine how channel dynamics influence the neural representation of space in the behaving animal. A second, parallel line of research, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods to further parse out ionic expression patterns in entorhinal cortices and determine how gradients in ion channels develop. Ultimately, our work aims to understand the ontogenesis and relevance of medial entorhinal cortical topography in spatial memory and navigation.

  • Aaron D. Gitler

    Aaron D. Gitler

    Stanford Medicine Basic Science Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and ALS. We don't limit ourselves to one model system or experimental approach. We start with yeast, perform genetic and chemical screens, and then move to other model systems (e.g. mammalian tissue culture, mouse, fly) and even work with human patient samples (tissue sections, patient-derived cells, including iPS cells) and next generation sequencing approaches.

  • Jeffrey S.  Glenn, M.D., Ph.D.

    Jeffrey S. Glenn, M.D., Ph.D.

    Joseph D. Grant Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Glenn's primary interest is in molecular virology, with a strong emphasis on translating this knowledge into novel antiviral therapies. Other interests include exploitation of hepatic stem cells, engineered human liver tissues, liver cancer, and new biodefense antiviral strategies.